AMUSEMENT GAMES at the New “8 Octavia” Condo Building – BUT IS IT ART? Oh, Hell No

April 24th, 2014

Well that’s how I read it anyway, but really it’s “AMUSEMENT TIMES,” and it’s a piece designed to get you to like / tolerate the new 8 Octavia Building.

Here are the deets from our local Curbed outfit

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Simply, this isn’t art worth paying for. Why not instead just use the same amount of money to hand out $5 bills to passers by? That would make you much more popular, 8 Octavia.

(Oh, the on-site homeless encampment at 8 Octavia got cleaned out the past 12 hours? News to me – Ill check it out.)

The Aftermath of a Typical Audi vs. MUNI Bus Fender Bender Accident, in NoPA, Right in Front of NOPA

April 24th, 2014

(Would any of these people have been here 15 years ago? I srsly doubt it.)

Note that I call this accident an accident because it wasn’t on purpose…

Anyway, let’s chalk this one up to the unnecessarily expensive Audi, which has just one defective part: THE NUT BEHIND THE STEERING WHEEL

Train Trouble: Crossing Arms? The Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority Don’t Need No Stinking Crossing Arms!

April 24th, 2014

These four arrows tell the story. From right to left, we see a FEDEX DRIVER helping a VTA DRIVER remove a CROSSING ARM from the street after it fell off from the ELECTROMECHANICAL BARRIER DRIVE SYSTEM.

See?

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Then the train driver got back in and slowly, ever so slowly fled the scene.

Fin.

If Only the Corner of Scott and Fell had Bike Lanes, Then People Wouldn’t Ride on the Sidewalk!

April 24th, 2014

Whoops:

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420 Haight, or Thereabouts

April 24th, 2014

:

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Dennis Herrera Throws Down: Sues Short-Term Rental Scofflaws for Illegal Conversions, Unlawful Business Practices – Ellis Act, Baby!

April 23rd, 2014

[UPDATE: Direct link here and the full press kit with complaint here.]

City Attorney Dennis Herrera, The Happy Warrior:

“Herrera sues short-term rental scofflaws for illegal conversions, unlawful business practices

Two cases target ‘egregious offenders’—both involving Ellis Act evictions of disabled tenants to illegally convert residential apartments into tourist lodging

SAN FRANCISCO (April 23, 2014) — City Attorney Dennis Herrera today filed two separate lawsuits against short-term rental scofflaws for illegally converting residential apartments into commercial tourist lodging, which the property owners then marketed through such online platforms as Airbnb, Homeway.com and VRBO.com.  In both cases, the defendants had previously evicted long-term residents from their apartments under the Ellis Act, a state law that allows landlords to evict tenants and withdraw their properties from the residential rental market.  Two of the evicted tenants were disabled, according to San Francisco Superior Court and Rent Board records cited in today’s pleadings.

“In the midst of a housing crisis of historic proportions, illegal short-term rental conversions of our scarce residential housing stock risks becoming a major contributing factor,” said Herrera.  “The cases I’ve filed today target two egregious offenders.  These defendants didn’t just flout state and local law to conduct their illegal businesses, they evicted disabled tenants in order to do so.  Today’s cases are the first among several housing-related matters under investigation by my office, and we intend to crack down hard on unlawful conduct that’s exacerbating—and in many cases profiting from—San Francisco’s alarming lack of affordable housing.  I’m grateful to the city departments, including the San Francisco Planning Department, and community advocates who have worked with my office to help us pursue these kinds of scofflaws.  And I encourage tenants and neighbors to report housing-related wrongdoing online to my office through our Up2Code.org website or the Up2Code app, or by calling our Code Enforcement Hotline at (415) 554-3977.”

Herrera’s complaints filed in San Francisco Superior Court this morning detail pervasive violations of the city Planning Code and state Unfair Competition Law at three addresses: 3073-3075 Clay Street, owned by defendants Darren and Valerie Lee; and 734 and 790 Bay Street, which is owned or managed by defendants Lev, Tamara and Tatyana Yurovsky.  If successful, the litigation could result in permanent court-ordered injunctions; civil penalties of up to $200 per day for Planning Code violations; up to $2,500 for each unlawful business act; disgorgement of illegally obtained profits; and attorneys’ fees.  Though the Ellis Act itself does not preclude the commercial use of properties for tourists where long-term tenants have previously been evicted, Herrera’s litigation emphasized longstanding city policy that tourist conversions of residential properties be aggressively policed “in order to protect the residents and to conserve the limited housing resources.”

According to one of Herrera’s civil actions, defendants Darren and Valerie Lee purchased 3073-3075 Clay Street in 2004, and invoked the Ellis Act in 2005 to evict their tenants from both of the property’s residential units.  One of the evicted tenants was disabled.  Evidence presented in the complaint found that the Lees have marketed 3075 Clay Street, a four-bedroom, three-bathroom property, for tourist lodging on such vacation websites such as Homeaway.com and VRBO.com since 2009, describing it as an “exquisitely renovated home, in prime Pacific Heights.”  The Lees charged their guests between $395 and $595 per night for a minimum stay of three nights.  But in doing so, the owners flouted the city’s required conditional use authorization process—depriving neighbors and city planners of their role to first determine whether the conversion is necessary or desirable; compatible with the neighborhood; detrimental to the City’s housing stock; or consistent with the city’s Planning Code or Planning Department’s General Plan.  According to Herrera’s complaint, San Francisco’s Planning Department repeatedly cited the Lees for their illegal use of the property for commercial tourist lodging, even collecting penalties of as much $250 per day for violations.  The Lees—who at one point assured Planning Department officials that their illegal conduct had stopped—then defiantly resumed marketing and renting their property to tourists.  In 3073 Clay Street, the Lees evicted a disabled tenant who had lived in the unit for more than ten years and, until evicted, was paying $1,087 per month.  By invoking the Ellis Act, the Lees were legally restricted until August 25, 2011, from re-renting the unit at market rate.  But evidence presented in Herrera’s action shows that the Lees admitted to the Planning Department that they had, in fact, re-rented 3073 Clay Street and charged their new residential tenants between $5,000-$7,038 per month.

Herrera’s other civil complaint against Lev, Tamara and Tatyana Yurovsky notes that they, too, used the Ellis Act to evict long-term residential tenants — including one who was disabled — from one of their properties, at 734 Bay Street.  Together with a residential unit at another of their properties owned by Lev and Tatyana and managed by Tamara, at 790 Bay Street, the Yurovskys illegally converted their apartments into tourist use beginning in 2010.  They marketed the rentals to tourists on Airbnb.com and “greatsfvacation.com” for rates of between $165 and $320 per night, with three-night minimum stays.  Though the Yurovsky defendants boasted on social media that they had hosted several hundred tourists, according to evidence detailed in the complaint, they too flouted the city’s conditional use authorization process, violating the San Francisco Planning Code and state law.

The cases are: City and County of San Francisco and People of the State of California v. Darren Lee et al., San Francisco Superior Court No. 538857; and City and County of San Francisco and People of the State of California v. Tamara Yurovsky et al., San Francisco Superior Court No. 538854.  Additional documentation from the case is available on the City Attorney’s website at:http://www.sfcityattorney.org/.

The SF Opera, Symphony, and Ballet Team Up to Offer Estate Planning Advice for LGBT Couples on June 5th

April 23rd, 2014

Well, Gentle Reader, you’re richer, older, and wiser than I, so I won’t spell out who’s doing what for why.

I think this might be good for you:

 

 

Deb L. Kinney explains what you need to know post Windsor and DOMA

Estate planning for the LGBT community has always been complicated. With changes in the law since the seminal case of The United States v. Windsor, same-sex couples are afforded most federal recognition, but are there simpler plans? How does or would marriage change your estate plan or your income, estate and property tax issues? Does it matter if you move from California or have income or assets in other states?

Deb L. Kinney from Johnston Kinney and Zulaica LLP will lead a lively seminar and discussion on the various changes in the law since Windsor was decided. Specifically Deb will talk about estate planning and whether you want one trust or two, social security benefits and how to take advantage of lifetime and death benefits, the importance of properly titling and/or retitling real property and other assets, Medicare benefits, pre-nuptial agreements, deferred tax retirement accounts, and charitable giving.

Join us on June 5th from 6pm to 8pm at the Chris Hellman Center for Dance, 455 Franklin Street, San Francisco. For more information about this event, please contact San Francisco Ballet Planned Giving Manager Elizabeth Lani at 415.865.6623 orelani@sfballet.org.

This event is jointly hosted by:

(And let me just say that New College of the Law is what you make of it, or rather, was what you made of it since it’s defunct now. Some, like infamous non-attorney “Ivory Madison,” want to use it to make boasts about being “trained as an attorney,” whilst others, you know, graduated, passed the bar and developed a specialty – which do you think is more upworthy, just saying.)

OMG, the Magic Bus is on the Loose Just Days After Its Big DUI Accident in the Mission – WSPTOTC?

April 23rd, 2014

Hey, who’s driving this Magic Bus these days if its PIC just got pinched for DUI en La Mision?

As seen on Oak, just yesterday:

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WSPTOTC?

The Best Billboard Ever: “HEADED TO WORK? SO ARE THE BURGLARS” – Bay Alarm Really Makes You Think

April 23rd, 2014

Stanyan Street Whole Foods Wishes a “HAPPY 4.20″ Day to All the Marijuana Smokers in Haight Ashbury

April 23rd, 2014

See?

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