Bay Area Airport Capacity Study – Public Hearings Coming to a City Near You

The Bay Area is running out of airport so a big study is going on to try to see what to do.

Maybe some of our smaller airfields could pick up some of the load, or maybe the military could pitch in, somehow.

Anyway, they’re holding public meetings soon so why don’t you get in on the fun?

 Monday, May 10, 2010, 7 pm – 9 pm
 Community Room
 Municipal Services Center
 33 Arroyo Drive, South San Francisco

 Tuesday, May 11, 2010, 7 pm – 9 pm
 First Floor, Multipurpose Room
 675 Texas Street, Fairfield

 Wednesday, May 12, 2010, 7 pm – 9 pm
 Port of Oakland Exhibit Room
 530 Water Street, Oakland

Are a lot more bigger airplanes in our future? How many 1000-passsenger Airbus A380-1000′s (or more realistically, 900-passenger A380-900′s) will we need?

A watery welcome for a big boy A380-800 (called El Gordo by pilotos) at SFO not too long ago:

At least there’s room for a horseshoe bar in a superjumbo. As seen over the Farallones:

If we can’t have more better runways at sometimes-foggy SFO, then look forward to ever bigger aircraft, for better or worse…

All right, see you there at those meetings.

All the deets, after the jump.

And here’s a comment from knowledgeable ActionNewsSF. (7500 Followers Can’t Be Wrong.)

ActionNewsSF says:
May 7, 2010 at 3:37 pm 

“Interesting topic. After reading this article, I spoke with an “aviation expert”. We both agreed that either Buchanan Field in Concord or the Livermore Airport makes the best sense. We were surprised that the Livermore Airport is not on this map. The challenges for both of these locations would be selling to the residents who live near the airports.

Livermore is a great location due to its proximity to Modesto, Stockton, and Sacramento. An upgrade to Highway 84 and Vasco Road could makes this a very attractive site.

Concord is a good location because it is on a BART line and close to Solano County, Stockton and Sacramento.

Moffett is too close to SFO and SJC.

Byron is too far for 580 and upgrading an airport there means we have to build more freeways and extend BART to the middle of nowhere.

Napa would mean major upgrades to Highways 29, 12, and 37. This airport would really only be able to serve Napa, Solano and possibly Sonoma Counties. There really is no major transit line that serves this area. You know what that means? 30 years after it’s built, we’ll have to spend billions extending BART across the Carquinez Strait and through Vallejo.

Travis AFB in Fairfield is a possibility, but really too far from the Greater Bay Area. Once again, this means major upgrades to an already congested I-80.

Hopefully existing infrastructure and having to deal with the restrictions of nearby residents, something San Jose has to deal with, will be considered. I also hope that any future project will not waste our money, as the MTC did recently by renaming the Translink card.”

 

As promised, here are the deets:

Regional Study of Bay Area Airport Capacity. Public meetings scheduled in South San Francisco, Fairfield and Oakland May 10-12

OAKLAND, Calif., May 6 — With the number of air passengers traveling through the Bay Area expected to increase from 60 million to 100 million by 2035, planners are looking at ways of accommodating the demand without expanding runways. Options will be explored at three public hearings scheduled for next week. The meetings are sponsored by Bay Area regional agencies to gather public input on how to manage forecasted demand at the region’s three primary airports (San Francisco, Oakland and San Jose) in order to preserve a healthy economy, ensure safe and reliable travel, and protect the environment. The meetings will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. on Monday, May 10 in South San Francisco; Tuesday, May 11 in Fairfield; and Wednesday, May 12 in Oakland.

Airports are an integral part of the Bay Area transportation system and play a central role in meeting the travel and economic needs of the Bay Area’s residents and businesses. With this study the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC), the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG), and the San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission (BCDC) are exploring possibilities for balancing the demand among the region’s three major airports, such as modifying times of heavy airline traffic, increasing average aircraft size, implementing new air traffic control technologies to improve operations during poor weather, serving some passengers by high-speed rail, and using smaller general aviation and federal/military airports in and outside the Bay Area region. Given the expense and environmental concerns with building new runways, these potential solutions focus on distributing airport demand.

 Meetings will be held:

 Monday, May 10, 2010, 7 pm – 9 pm
 Community Room
 Municipal Services Center
 33 Arroyo Drive, South San Francisco

 Tuesday, May 11, 2010, 7 pm – 9 pm
 First Floor, Multipurpose Room
 675 Texas Street, Fairfield

 Wednesday, May 12, 2010, 7 pm – 9 pm
 Port of Oakland Exhibit Room
 530 Water Street, Oakland

 ABOUT THE REGIONAL AIRPORT STUDY

The Regional Airport Study is currently under way. With projected growth in business and recreational travel, as well as with growth in the shipment of air cargo, Bay Area airports may face capacity issues in the future, as early as 2020.

 Current forecasts estimate that by 2035:
 –  Bay Area air passengers will increase by 67% (from 60.6 million annual
     passengers in 2007 to 101.3 million annual passengers in 2035);
 –  Air cargo will increase 92% in terms of weight (from 1.4 million tons
     in 2007 to 2.7 million tons in 2035); and
 –  Business jet activity will increase by 56% (going from about 75,000
     arrivals and departures currently to nearly 117,000 by 2035).

The Study will be completed in early 2011. For more information, visit www.regionalairportstudy.com. Send questions or comments to info@regionalairportstudy.com.

Source: Metropolitan Transportation Commission

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2 Responses to “Bay Area Airport Capacity Study – Public Hearings Coming to a City Near You”

  1. ActionNewsSF says:

    Interesting topic. After reading this article, I spoke with an “aviation expert”. We both agreed that either Buchanan Field in Concord or the Livermore Airport makes the best sense. We were surprised that the Livermore Airport is not on this map. The challenges for both of these locations would be selling to the residents who live near the airports.

    Livermore is a great location due to its proximity to Modesto, Stockton, and Sacramento. An upgrade to Highway 84 and Vasco Road could makes this a very attractive site.

    Concord is a good location because it is on a BART line and close to Solano County, Stockton and Sacramento.

    Moffett is too close to SFO and SJC.

    Byron is too far for 580 and upgrading an airport there means we have to build more freeways and extend BART to the middle of nowhere.

    Napa would mean major upgrades to Highways 29, 12, and 37. This airport would really only be able to serve Napa, Solano and possibly Sonoma Counties. There really is no major transit line that serves this area. You know what that means? 30 years after it’s built, we’ll have to spend billions extending BART across the Carquinez Strait and through Vallejo.

    Travis AFB in Fairfield is a possibility, but really too far from the Greater Bay Area. Once again, this means major upgrades to an already congested I-80.

    Hopefully existing infrastructure and having to deal with the restrictions of nearby residents, something San Jose has to deal with, will be considered. I also hope that any future project will not waste our money, as the MTC did recently by renaming the Translink card.

  2. sfcitizen says:

    Well, I can’t make it, hope somebody goes to one of these meetings and makes a report…