Call Us When the Shuttle Lands: SF StreetsBlog Goes Looooong Form to Tell Us Something About Auto Repair Shops

[UPDATE: @StreetsblogDC Can you explain/justify the stsblog sf article that compares car repair shops to cancer? is.gd/km5OCw]

Uh, what?

Do you climb into space, to the world where you live, SF StreetsBlog?

Or, in other words:

njudah Greg Dewar: 
Ever read something that just makes you say WTF? http://bit.ly/mODLOU

And oh, speaking of car repair shops within a stone’s throw of Fulton and Divisadero, let’s all say bye-bye to BODY MASTER USA / Auto City. One supposes it couldn’t afford the rents in pricey NoPA these days. How long will the iconic Transformers graffito last?

Click to expand

And oh, speaking of car repair and Transformers, leave us take note of lovely Megan Fox…

…who knows better than to tangle with the urban NIMBYs of the 415.

She knows that the Future is all about Rural Auto Repair.

Hurray!

And oh, it appears as if I was able to make my point with the word count coming in well below 1300.

Hurray!

My uncle has a country place 
That no one knows about. 
He says it used to be a farm, 
Before the Motor Law….

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13 Responses to “Call Us When the Shuttle Lands: SF StreetsBlog Goes Looooong Form to Tell Us Something About Auto Repair Shops”

  1. Guest says:

    Actually… what is your point?

  2. sfcitizen says:

    Did you read the 1300-word article cited? What do you think about it?

    Did you read the Tweet from Greg?

  3. Guest says:

    Yes, and yes, but can you elaborate more clearly on why they’re “in space”?

  4. sfcitizen says:

    motor traffic sewers,
    TRAFFIC SEWER = STREET?

    but when they’re placed without restriction in the thick of restaurants,
    WHICH CAME FIRST, THE CAR SHOPS OR THE FOO FOO RESTAURANTS?

    can they hinder our city’s most valuable streets as desirable places to be?
    WHAT’S A MOST VALUABLE STREET? AREN’T ALL STREETS VALUABLE?

    “provided they treat them respectfully.”
    RESPECTFULLY, WHAT? THAT’S NIMBY TALK, RIGHT?

    “It’s possible to design them in a way that doesn’t destroy the positive qualities of walkable neighborhoods,”
    AGAIN, NIMBY TALK.

    Watching cars being repaired up on their lifts with repairmen wandering around is a kind of interesting urban activity.”
    WHAT?

    Although Tumlin said they might not be ideal on the city’s “more precious commercial streets,
    MY PRECIOUS!

    it’s something that can lend authenticity and local character to the more work-a-day centers of neighborhoods.”
    HAHAHHAHAHAHHAHHAHAHA! “authenticity”

    “If you recognize that some percentage of San Franciscans will continue to own cars for a long time,
    THAT PERCENTAGE IS GOING UP, LATELY, WITH NO SIGNS OF ABATING, ACTUALLY.

    required to be “screened behind active commercial or residential uses,” he said.
    OH NO, DON’T LET THE NIMBYS SEE CARS!

    San Francisco historian and Streetsblog contributor Chris Carlsson said he “would like to turn them all into community centers.”
    AND SANTA WILL COME FROM MARS TO BUY UP ALL OUR AUTO REPAIR SHOPS TO TURN THEM INTO COMMUNITY CENTERS. ALL OF THEM!

    “bizarrely contribute positively in many ways to the vitality of the commercial districts there,”
    BIZARRELY!

  5. Guest says:

    Okay, so from what I gather, you are defending repair shops, but aren’t those quotes from Jeffrey Tumlin that you’re criticizing mostly doing that too? Like “adding autheticity,” “interesting urban activity,” “contribute positively in many ways to the vitality of the commercial districts there,” etc. Are you sure you’re reading it right?

  6. sfcitizen says:

    Who’s attacking the repair shops in the first place?
    A traffic sewer means a street, right? Or not. Maybe it means a “bad” street. Is this explained? No, because it comes from outer space, the place where people know what the term traffic sewer means.

    Why these quotes worth anything from Tumlin worth anything? I think what he’s saying is that we can’t just shut down car repair shops because some NIMBYs have NIMBY concerns…

    What’s the point of SFStreetsblog? To simply look like journalism? Like, I’m getting paid for 8 hours today so I got to write something? Like, how can I influence the SFMTA today?

    It’s advocacy journalism, but it’s so esoteric it’s in outer space.

    IMO.

  7. mikesonn says:

    “esoteric it’s in outer space”? Really?

    I thought it brought up a discussion people who are interested in livable streets should have. I never got the impression it was advocating for the removal of repair shops, but bringing to light that we should be thinking about their placement and, if they are already there, how we can bring them into the surrounding streetscape better.

    Maybe Streetsblog isn’t for everyone and that’s fine. But to claim it is from “outer space” because you, or Dewar, don’t understand every bit of terminology is a bit heavy-handed.

  8. sfcitizen says:

    Well, I guess it assumes that we’re all on the Livable Streets bandwagon.

    Have you seen Octavia Boulevard? That’s Livable Streets in action. I don’t approve.

    If the writer could snap his fingers and eliminate auto repair shops he would, right?

    This is the response from somebody who’s familiar with a ton of San Francisco websites. In his opinion, this post is off:
    “Brock Keeling
    While I don’t think it was the author’s intent at all, the elitism and classism of this is frightening. To say the least.”

    I share that opinion, obviously,

    I don’t know what kind of traffic SF.Streetsblog gets exactly, but I’m kind of shocked at how low its numbers are when I checked a somewhat unreliable source. I wonder if they’re on a “sustainable journey,” salary-wise. What kind of endowment would SFSB need to be sustainable. Anyway, if Streetsblog is religion, then I wandered into the wrong church. I didn’t feel that way before when reading SFSB, but I do now after this ridiculous 1300 word bit.

    Or in other words, I _don’t_ think we should be thinking about the placement of auto shops. They’ve pretty much have been banned from the areas SBSF wants them banned from and the legacy shops, well, some of them will go away and some of them will stay. OK fine. Obviously.

    And traffic sewer is “terminology?” Really? I can think of it being used in at least two ways, as stated before – either it’s every street or just ones the author doesn’t approve of. That tells me more about the author than the street, actually.

    And this is the kicker:

    “San Francisco historian and Streetsblog contributor Chris Carlsson said he “would like to turn them all into community centers.”
    AND SANTA WILL COME FROM MARS TO BUY UP ALL OUR AUTO REPAIR SHOPS TO TURN THEM INTO COMMUNITY CENTERS. ALL OF THEM!

  9. sfcitizen says:

    I guess I didn’t realize how NIMBY StreetsBlog is, that’s all.

  10. mikesonn says:

    I disagree.

  11. sfcitizen says:

    All right, well, fair enough.

    Note to other commenters: Maybe it’s your right to post whatever comments you want on other blogs, but not this one…

  12. Jym Dyer says:

    ° A “traffic sewer” is a certain kind of street treatment, not “a street” per se, as you could have found out with a simple web search. As for Octavia, that was so thoroughly redesigned by committee that it’s not really an exemplar.

  13. sfcitizen says:

    So which streets _aren’t_ traffic sewers? They’re all traffic sewers, in your opinion, or somebody’s, right?

    http://www.google.com/#sclient=psy&hl=en&safe=off&source=hp&q=%22traffic+sewer%22&pbx=1&oq=%22traffic+sewer%22&aq=f&aqi=g-v1&aql=&gs_sm=e&gs_upl=4684l7122l1l7381l2l2l0l0l0l0l211l369l0.1.1l2l0&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.&fp=1c48fa5191b9651e&biw=1682&bih=981

    I don’t know, you can throw in definition or defined into the search and that doesn’t help too much. (You do get references to streetsblog tho, which tells me that we’re on the cutting edge. 1300 words but not enough to explain a phrase that the typical reader would be hazy about. OK, fine.

    Award-winning Octavia, which was designed specifically to be an exemplar for the “boulevard movement” trend of The Aughts _isn’t_ an exemplar.

    It’s certainly an example of poor planning, poor design. But no, there are no lessons to be learned, it’s off to the next project…

    Why don’t we just get rid of Octavia?

    What are the goals of the writer? Getting paid to knock out 1300 words on the wished-for future of hated auto repair shops? If that was one of the goals then MISSION ACCOMPLISHED. But if the goal was to affect policy, then I don’t think is doing your movement any favors…

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