It’s Food Day: Watch “Food Deserts: Legal, Social, and Public Health Challenges” Live from UC Hastings at 1:00 PM

OMG, it’s Food Day 2011, so check the link to see what’s going on about the Bay Area today.

Here’s the manifesto:

At UC Hastings in Civic Center, the UCSF / UC Hastings Consortium on Law, Science & Health Policy will put on Food Deserts: Legal, Social, and Public Health Challenges starting at 1:00 PM.

Watch it on the livestream, why not? Or see about heading over to this free event yourself.

All the deets:

“Food Deserts: Legal, Social, and Public Health Challenges

Start: 10/24/2011 from 1:00 PM to 7:00 PM
Location: 200 McAllister, Alumni Reception Center

The UCSF / UC Hastings Consortium on Law, Science & Health Policy is sponsoring a conference entitled “Food Deserts: Legal, Social, and Public Health Challenges” on Food Day, October 24, 2011.
The conference will bring together scholars from the health sciences and the law, as well as policymakers, activists, and food industry members, to discuss two important aspects of “food deserts,” places where access to a nutritionally-adequate diet is severely restricted.

One panel, Nourishing Our Neighborhoods: Insights from Law, Planning, and Industry, will cover the broad issue of geographical food deserts, usually urban areas inhabited by mostly-poor people whose transportation and finances are limited, where food sellers are predominantly small stores that cannot stock a wide variety of fresh food items, and where full-service grocery stores hesitate to locate. Are there policies (such as those in zoning rules) that could be changed to enable oases in these food deserts? What impact does, for example, the addition of a full-service grocery store have on the health of the neighboring area?

Another panel, Food and Nutrition in Correctional Institutions, will consider issues relevant to prisons and jails. While food offerings must meet certain basic caloric and nutritional requirements, the institutional nature of food preparation and food service might make that food less than appealing, and the healthier elements of meals might well be those not regularly or fully consumed. The supplemental food offerings – those for sale in these institutions – are not likely to be nutritious. Some research suggests that improved nutrition in prisons leads to improved penal outcomes. If that is so, what policy changes should be implemented? Would such changes be cost-beneficial, considering penal outcomes and the government’s responsibility for health care of prisoners?

At 5 pm, Dr. David Kessler, former Commissioner of the United States Food and Drug Administration and Professor of Pediatrics and Epidemiology and Biostatistics, UCSF, will give the keynote address on The End of Overeating. This conference will be free and open to the public.”

Ever more deets after the jump

Food Day Conference at UC Hastings Law, 10/24/11
Food Deserts: Legal, Social & Public Health Challenges

“Some of the events are especially creative. University of California Hastings School of Law and University of California, San Francisco are collaborating on a conference about prisons as food deserts.” — Deborah Gardner, Atlantic Monthly

SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 20, 2011 — Communities around the country are gearing up for Food Day, a grassroots mobilization aimed at improving America’s food policies. Set for Monday, October 24, 2011, Food Day will see thousands of forums and celebrations from coast to coast aimed at promoting healthy diets and solving local communities’ food problems.

“Food Deserts: Legal, Social & Public Health Challenges,” presented by the UCSF/UC Hastings Consortium on Law, Science & Health Policy, will bring together scholars from the health sciences and the law, as well as policymakers, activists, and food industry members. Discussion will focus on two important aspects of “food deserts” — places where access to a nutritionally-adequate diet is severely restricted.

Keynote Address by Dr. David A. Kessler, BA, MD, JD, former Commissioner of the United States Food and Drug Administration and author of The End of Overeating: Taking Control of the Insatiable American Appetite.

This event is free and open to the public. Sponsored by the UCSF/UC Hastings Consortium on Law, Science & Health Policy, the Center for Vulnerable Populations at SF General Hospital, the Science and Technology Law Journal, and the California Correctional Crisis blog.

Where/When:
10/24/2011 from 1:00 PM to 7:00 PM, at UC Hastings Law, 200 McAllister, Alumni Reception Center
Live-streaming will also be available through the Food Day event link on the UC Hastings website on October 24th.

Roster/Agenda:

1:30-3:00 PM
Nourishing Our Neighborhoods: Insights from Law, Planning, and Industry
This panel will cover the broad issue of geographical food deserts, usually urban areas inhabited by mostly-poor people whose transportation and finances are limited, where food sellers are predominantly small stores that cannot stock a wide variety of fresh food items, and where full-service grocery stores hesitate to locate. Are there policies (such as those in zoning rules) that could be changed to enable oases in these food deserts? What impact does, for example, the addition of a full-service grocery store have on the health of the neighboring area?

Panelists:
Marice Ashe, JD, MPH, Founder and Director, Public Health Law & Policy.
Rajiv Bhatia, MD, MPH, Director of Occupational and Environmental Health, San Francisco Department of Public Health.
Amy Cohen, BA, MA, Director of Neighborhood Business Development, San Francisco Mayor’s Office of Economic and Workforce Development.
Regina Davis, BA, MA, Executive Director, San Francisco Housing Development Corporation.
Nick Griffin, BA, MA, Senior Project Manager, Tenderloin Neighborhood Development Corporation.
Moderator: Hilary Seligman, MD, MAS, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, UCSF, and Center for Vulnerable Populations, San Francisco General Hospital.

3:15-4:45 PM
Food and Nutrition in Correctional Institutions
This panel will consider issues relevant to prisons and jails. While food offerings must meet certain basic caloric and nutritional requirements, the institutional nature of food preparation and food service might make that food less than appealing, and the healthier elements of meals might well be those not regularly or fully consumed. The supplemental food offerings – those for sale in these institutions – are not likely to be nutritious. Some research suggests that improved nutrition in prisons leads to improved penal outcomes. If that is so, what policy changes should be implemented? Would such changes be cost-beneficial, considering penal outcomes and the government’s responsibility for health care of prisoners?

Panelists:
Hadar Aviram, LLB, MA, Ph.D, Associate Professor of Law, UC Hastings College of the Law.
Robert Griefinger, MD, consultant on prisoner health care.
Laurie Maurino, RD, Departmental Food Administrator, California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation.
Beth Waitkus, BA, MS, Director, Insight Garden Program, San Quentin Prison.
Moderator: Brie Williams, MD, MS, clinician-researcher, UCSF.

5:00-6:00 PM
The End of Overeating, Keynote by Dr. David A. Kessler
Dr. David A. Kessler, BA, MD, JD, served as Commissioner of the United States Food and Drug Administration from 1990 to 1997. He has served as Dean of the Yale School of Medicine and as Dean of the School of Medicine and Vice-Chancellor at UCSF. He currently is Professor of Pediatrics and Epidemiology and Biostatistics, UCSF. He is the author of The End of Overeating: Taking Control of the Insatiable American Appetite (2009).

About UC Hastings College of the Law
UC Hastings College of the Law was founded in 1878 as the first law department of the University of California. Located in San Francisco’s Civic center, steps from City Hall, the State and Federal Buildings, the State Supreme, Superior and Appellate Courts as well as the United States District Court and Court of Appeals, the law school is an integral part of the fabric of the City of San Francisco and the California judicial system. Over the past 133 years, UC Hastings has served as the law school of choice for an ever-increasing diversity of students. Now, UC Hastings alumni span the globe and are among the most respected lawyers, judges, public servants, and business leaders today.

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