The Horrible Pedestrians of Masonic Avenue – See How They Run – A Darwin Award Loser

Here’s how some people cross six lanes of Masonic at Ewing Terrace:

Click to expand

Now, is this kind of thing legal? Well sure, if you’re walking – this could be one of those unmarked crosswalk deals.

But it’s not legal to cross here if you’re running. Sorry pedestrian.

(Our FUBARed beyond all reason SFMTA has a plan to put a traffic light in here whenever it can get its grand mal Masonic Street Design off the ground.)

Now a little further up the hill, we lost a ped who was similarly jaywalking earlier this year. I guess we could blame accidents like that the 30 MPH speed limit in front of Trader Joe’s, but that’s not how I’d look at it.

I’d look at it by trying to get inside the peds’ heads to try to think of a way to get them to not kill themselves.

Oh well.

Masonic Avenue Street Design Study

Engineering hearing on proposed changes, May 13, 2011

Masonic Street Redesign Study final report (PDF)

The survey results from the third community meeting, held on September 30, 2010, at San Francisco Day School (PDF), are available.

About the Project

The primary goal of the Masonic Avenue Street Design Study is to identify how Masonic Avenue between Geary Boulevard and Fell Street can safely and efficiently accommodate the needs of all roadway users, including but not limited to pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists and Muni. The project is funded by the San Francisco County Transportation Authority through the Prop K half-cent local transportation sales tax program.

Objectives:

1. Engage representatives of all constituencies within the community who would be impacted by changes to Masonic Avenue including, but not limited to, residents on Masonic Avenue, residents on side-streets, merchants, school representatives, bicyclists, Muni customers and pedestrians.

2. Improve transit operation.

3. Improve pedestrian and non-motorized access to transit.

4. Increase the safety of pedestrian crossings.

5. Increase motorist compliance with traffic rules and regulations.

6. Reduce the number of vehicular collisions, especially those involving pedestrians and bicyclists.

7. Support neighborhood vitality by creating a more inviting and accommodating public realm.

Community meeting presentations

The following presentations from the various community meetings are available from the San Francisco Planning Department website:

First community meeting presentation, June 15, 2010, Day School, PDF, 7MB
Second community meeting presentation, Aug. 10, 2010, Day School, PDF, 7MB
Third community meeting presentation, Sept. 30, 2010, Day School, PDF, 6MB

James Shahamiri
415.701.4732
james.shahamiri@sfmta.com

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