Learning From Japan, 2013: Taxis Everywhere, As Far As The Eye Can See – Much Different Than San Francisco!

Whoa, baby!

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And they have illegal taxis too, just as San Francisco! ‘Cept instead of calling them Lyft or whathaveyou, the Japanese refer to illegal cabs as shiroi takushi (white taxis) owing to the┬áconcomitant non-commercial white license plates.

Anyway, they’re all over the place out on the streets, not just bottled up at the airport, that’s my point.

Oh, and if the local police in Japan found out that you were still operating AFTER receiving a cease and desist notice, well, they just might impound your ride (AND your whimsical novelty pink mustache) and then lock you up for 20-something days, you know, to teach you a lesson. Oh, you want to call your family to tell them where you are, or your boss to explain your absence, or a lawyer to get sprung? Well fine, just sign this complete confession first. I’m srsly. Whatever you do, don’t “disrupt” in Japan, Lyfters.

Anyway, legal taxis are all over the place in Japan, that’s my point.

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3 Responses to “Learning From Japan, 2013: Taxis Everywhere, As Far As The Eye Can See – Much Different Than San Francisco!”

  1. Sigh says:

    SF artificially creates a shortage of taxis so that the politically connected operatives (who own the medallions and lease them out to the drivers) can make shitloads of money.

    Taxi Commission is propagating a monopoly. It should be disbanded. Let anyone with the skills and the equipment run a taxi in the City.

  2. Alai says:

    That raises a question: are the taxis in Japan a monopoly? Obviously, one of the reasons we have unlicensed operators is that it’s difficult/impossible to get a license (medallion).

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