Archive for August, 2013

OMG, “METALLICA THROUGH THE NEVER” to Premiere at 36th Mill Valley Film Festival – Sept 17, $85

Friday, August 30th, 2013


San Rafael, CA, August 30, 2013 – The Mill Valley Film Festival is excited to announce a special kick-off event in anticipation of the 36th Mill Valley Film Festival. James Hetfield, Lars Ulrich, Kirk Hammett and Robert Trujillo will be on hand to present the U.S. Public Premiere of their new 3D feature film that combines a spectacular arena live performance with a surreal adventure story. Picturehouse’s new release METALLICA THROUGH THE NEVER is a feature film starring members of the iconic rock band and emerging young star Dane DeHaan (The Place Beyond the PinesKill Your DarlingsThe Amazing Spider-Man 2).

In this music-driven, 3D motion picture event, award-winning filmmaker Nimród Antal (PredatorsKontroll) immerses audiences in a bracing, raw and visceral cinematic experience with spectacular live performance footage of Metallica’s most iconic songs – created exclusively for film – combined with a bold, narrative story featuring imagery drawn from the band’s trailblazing iconography. Dane DeHaan portrays Trip, a young roadie sent on an urgent mission, during the Metallica’s roaring live set in front of a sold-out arena.  The film features dazzling pyrotechnics, the most elaborate live-performance stage ever built and state-of-the-art 3-D photography, captured using up to 24 cameras simultaneously. Picturehouse will releaseM ETALLICA THROUGH THE NEVER in North America on September 27, 2013exclusively in over 300 IMAX® 3D Theatres, and will expand into additional theaters on October 4, 2013.

WHO:             Metallica – James Hetfield, Lars Ulrich, Kirk Hammett and Robert Trujillo, along with Dane DeHaan and Nimród Antal

WHAT:            METALLICA THROUGH THE NEVER Pre Festival Screening
U.S. Public Premiere
Followed by on-stage interview and audience Q&A, moderated by Mark Fishkin, Executive Director, California Film Institute and Founder, Mill Valley Film Festival

WHEN:           Tuesday, September 17, 2013 at 7:15 PM

WHERE:        Christopher B. Smith Rafael Film Center
1118 4th Street, San Rafael, CA 94901

TICKETS:        $85 General Admission. For ticket information please visit                                      

About the 36th Mill Valley Film Festival 
Presented by the California Film Institute, the 36th Mill Valley Film Festival runsOctober 3-13, 2013 at the CinéArts@Sequoia (25 Throckmorton Avenue, Mill Valley), Christopher B. Smith Rafael Film Center (1118 Fourth Street, San Rafael), and other venues throughout the Bay Area.

The internationally acclaimed Mill Valley Film Festival is greatly anticipated by cinema aficionados and film industry professionals alike, is well known for the quality of its programming, and is considered a major launching pad for the annual awards season.  It has established an impressive track record for launching new films and new filmmakers, and has earned a reputation as a filmmakers’ festival by offering a high-profile, prestigious, noncompetitive environment for celebrating the best in independent and world cinema. MVFF holds the distinction of presenting premieres of four of the last five films that have gone on to win the Academy Award for Best Picture (Slumdog Millionaire, The King’s Speech, The Artist, Argo).

Each year, the 11-day Festival welcomes more than 200 filmmakers, representing over 50 countries from around the world. Festival sections include: World Cinema; US Cinema; Valley of the Docs; Children’s FilmFest; 5@5, a daily shorts program; and Active Cinema, MVFF’s activist films initiative. Gala celebrations, tributes to actors and filmmakers, workshops, panels and seminars, as well as opportunities to mingle with filmmakers in the spectacular setting of the San Francisco Bay Area are just a few of the reasons Screen International named Mill Valley one of its top 10 US film festivals.
Tickets are $14.00 (CFI Members, $11.50), unless otherwise noted and are available for purchase starting on September 8 for CFI or MVFF Fast Pass holders, Premier Patron and Cinema Benefactors only; September 9 for Director’s Circle and above; September 10 for Gold Star and above; September 12 for all CFI Members only and September 14 for the general public. For tickets and additional information, please visit or call 877.874.MVFF (6833).

About Metallica
Formed in 1981 by drummer Lars Ulrich and guitarist and vocalist James Hetfield, Metallica have become one of the most influential and commercially successful rock bands in history, having sold 110 million albums worldwide and playing to millions of fans the world over. They have scored several multi-platinum albums, including 1991’s Metallica (commonly referred to as “The Black Album”), which is the best selling album in history of Soundscan scanning 16 million albums in the United States alone.  Their latest album, Death Magnetic, was certified platinum just six weeks after it debuted atop the Billboard Top 200 Album chart in October 2008. Death Magnetic charted at #1 in 32 countries. Metallica have also garnered numerous awards and accolades, including nine Grammy Awards, two American Music Awards, and multiple MTV Video Music Awards, and were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in 2009.  The band recently celebrated its 30th-Anniversary with a week’s worth of Fan Club concerts at the Fillmore Theater in San Francisco, CA.  In 2012, they announced the launch of Orion Music + More, an annual two-day festival curated and headlined by the band.  Last summer, Metallica played eight shows to nearly 180,000 fans at the Sports Arena in Mexico City and unveiled a brand new stage in that contained iconic elements that spanned its 30+ year career.  The stage is featured in the upcoming film Metallica Through the Never which will be released this fall.  Metallica is currently on a run of dates throughout Asia and recently set the record for the fastest sell out concert by a Western band at the Mercedes Benz Arena in Shanghai, China.  For more information please

About the California Film Institute
The nonprofit California Film Institute celebrates and promotes film as art and education through the presentation of the Mill Valley Film Festival and year-round exhibitions at the Christopher B. Smith Rafael Film Center, film distribution by CFI Releasing, and building the next generation of filmmakers and audiences through the CFI Education program. For more information or (415) 383-5256.

As a nonprofit arts organization, CFI relies on the generosity of its community to sustain not only the Festival, but also the year-round programs of the Christopher B. Smith Rafael Film Center and CFI Education. The invaluable support of our sponsors, foundations, and individual donors ensures our continued success as we celebrate our 36th year.

CFI is once again proud to acknowledge the leadership support of Christopher B. and Jeannie Meg Smith, and the continued major support of Jennifer Coslett MacCready, Ken and Jackie Broad Family Fund, The Bernard Osher Foundation, the Gruber Family Foundation, the Marin Community Foundation, the Christine Zecca Foundation and the Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation. We are also fortunate to have the continued contributions of the following Major Sponsors of the Mill Valley Film Festival: Wells Fargo, Maroevich, O’Shea & Coghlan Insurance Services, Frantoio Ristorante and Olive Oil Co., Zaentz Media Center/A Wareham and Development.

If You Have a Car Towed from Near Your Driveway, It’s Owner Just Might Come Back and Paint “Fuck You” on Your House

Friday, August 30th, 2013

Like this.

Here’s the story from famous Akit:

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At Least One Mission Hipster Didn’t Make It to Burning Man This Year – It’s Skull Beard Man

Friday, August 30th, 2013

Or maybe he’s at BM13 right now, who’s to say?

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The Craziest Billboard Ever: “Visit Beautiful Island! Dodko, Korea!” – Insincerely Looming Over the I-80 in SoMA

Friday, August 30th, 2013

All right, here we go:

“The Liancourt Rocks … are a group of small islets in the Sea of Japan.”

Visiting these rocks for just 20 minutes, maximum, would involve a two lengthy flights* and then a 14-hour round-trip boat ride.

So this billboard, which is getting a lot of attention in South Korea, isn’t to promote tourism, it’s to promote politics:

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So it’s just like this one** (that used to be near AT&T Park?) that was put up by a Yelp three-star dentist from San Jose, who*** probably charges too much money if he has the spare cash to produce ineffectual billboards like these.

Which is fair enough.

I s’pose.

Now the thing about the “East Sea” is that every sea is an east sea, right? So we should rename the Atlantic Ocean the East Ocean because that’s how it seems from our perspective? And without Japan, the Sea of Japan would just be the Pacific Ocean, right?

All right, I’ll just sit back and wait for the invasion of the Liancourt Rocks, which is never going to happen, but if it did, it would go a little something like this.

All the deets:

“The Liancourt Rocks, also known as Dokdo or Tokto (독도/獨島, literally “solitary island”) in Korean, and Takeshima (たけしま/竹島?, literally “bamboo island”) in Japanese,[1] are a group of small islets in the Sea of Japan.” 

* Crew Resource Management optional?

** Significant? No. Nobody cared about the World Baseball Classic, 90% of San Franciscans have no knowledge of it.

*** Am I supposed to know what “Top Best *8*” means? I don’t.

Bay Area Bike Share Debuts Today at a Cost of $16K Per Bicycle, So Far

Thursday, August 29th, 2013

“Bay Area Bike Share debuts today

System goes live with 700 bikes at 70 stations in five cities

SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 29, 2013 — The Bay Area Air Quality Management District, the Metropolitan Transportation Commission and its project partners today announce the launch of the Bay Area Bike Share pilot program. Beginning today, the public will have access to shared bicycles 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at specific locations within the cities of San Francisco, Redwood City, Palo Alto, Mountain View and San Jose.


The Bay Area Bike Share pilot is a part of the MTC’s Initiatives Program and the Air District’s Transportation Fund for Clean Air program, which tests innovative projects for their ability to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from transportation.  The Air District initiated this effort in 2010 and has contributed $2.8 million to launch this project.  Touted as a “last mile solution”, the goal of the bike sharing pilot program is to make it more convenient for Bay Area residents to take public transit without taking their own bike on the system, and then use bike share bicycles to reach their final destination resulting in reduced air pollution in the areas served.

The cost of the full pilot totals $11.2 million, and is funded using Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality ($7.1 million), Transportation Fund for Clean Air ($2.8 million) and other local funds ($1.3 million). The program is managed by the Air District in partnership with MTC and local partners.

“We’re excited to announce the launch of this pioneering regional bike share program,” said Jack Broadbent, executive officer of the Air District.  “This system brings it all together and makes connecting from public transportation to the workplace or other destination simple, convenient and fun.”

Membership rates to join Bay Area Bike Share are $88 for an annual pass, $22 for a three-day pass and $9 for a daily pass. Each pass provides for unlimited trips during the membership period, with no additional cost for the first 30 minutes of each trip. Trips that exceed 30 minutes will incur surcharges. Annual memberships are available for sale at

“The launch of Bay Area Bike Share is the first step in our city’s efforts to build a world-class bike share system for San Francisco,” said San Francisco Mayor Edwin M. Lee. “Bay Area Bike Share will give San Francisco’s residents and visitors access to a bike when they want one. It’s an easy, convenient, affordable and healthy transportation option that we’re eager to add to our transportation network, and we look forward to seeing Bay Area Bike Share transform the way we move around San Francisco.”

The pilot will launch in two phases. The first phase is deploying today, August 29, 2013, with 700 bikes. For the second phase of the pilot, it is anticipated that 300 additional bikes and 30 kiosks will be added in the first quarter 2014 to reach the full pilot complement of 1,000 bikes and 100 stations.

“We are excited to participate in the Bay Area Bike Share pilot program and offer San Jose residents another convenient way to get around downtown and to/from our public transit hubs,” Mayor Chuck Reed said. “This type of program has the potential to get more cars off the road, reduce traffic congestion and promote a healthier and more vibrant community.”

The kiosk stations are located near transit hubs, high-density residential areas and key destination points such as employment centers and universities, making it easier to quickly and conveniently connect to and from transit and to make short-distance trips by bike.  Bike sharing will also help to reduce the need to take bikes on board regional and local transit – relieving congestion on those systems.

“Bicycles are a great way to attract new customers who now find transit is an option for them to cover the long distances from the train or the bus to their office. And it allows them to skip a transfer to other systems to reach their destinations,” said Michael J. Scanlon, CEO/general manager for the San Mateo County Transit District. “Bikeshare provides an option for transit operators who struggle to provide enough bicycle capacity and an incentive for new riders to take advantage of commute alternatives.”

In addition to the Air District and MTC, the pilot project is a partnership among local government agencies including the City and County of San Francisco, SamTrans, Caltrain, the County of San Mateo, the City of Redwood City and the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority.

In the Bay Area, the transportation sector accounts for more than 50 percent of overall air pollution. Significant emission reductions from the transportation sector will help the Bay Area attain and maintain state and national air quality standards and reduce greenhouse gases.

Bay Area residents and visitors can learn more about the bike share system at, and sfbayareabikeshare (twitter).

The Bay Area Air Quality Management District is the regional agency responsible for protecting air quality in the nine-county Bay Area. For more information, visit

MTC is the transportation planning, coordinating and financing agency for the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area, and operates the region’s 511 traveler information system.

The project partners who have joined together to launch this effort include:

Air District          Caltrain

MTC                   The County of San Mateo

City and Co. of SF    The City of Redwood City

SamTrans               Santa Clara Valley
Transportation Authority
SOURCE  The Bay Area Air Quality Management District

The Bay Area Air Quality Management District

CONTACT: Ralph Borrmann, 415.749.4900, MTC Contact: John Goodwin, 510-817-5862

Web Site:

What It Looks Like When a CA State Official Opens Part of the Bay Bridge: Gov Arnold + Oxy Fuel Welder = Sparks

Thursday, August 29th, 2013

Who will cut the chain for our long-delayed Bay Bridge when it reopens in a few days? IDK.

But the scene will look something like this.

Arnold opening the West Approach a half decade back:

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TMI, Frisco-Style: Presenting the Toyota Pious Hybrid HYBRID

Thursday, August 29th, 2013

But does it get better mileage than a non-hybrid Honda CRX HF from 1980’s?

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Sadly, no.

Oh well.

Marinello School of Beauty Walls Itself Off from the Twitterloin – Clearly, It was Unprepared for the Challenges of the Mid-Market

Wednesday, August 28th, 2013


After all that recent broken glass, things look a bit different, a bit less welcoming.

See? The fishbowl has been papered over:

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But if you want to get some work done, you oughta check it out.

What Price Beauty?

Very cheap

The Crosses of San Francisco’s Skyline, Houses of the Holy: One at Fillmore and McAllister, the Other at Croesus and Mammon

Wednesday, August 28th, 2013

Pick one: The King of Kings or Walter Shorenstein et alii?

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(Did you know that the Official Bird of San Francisco is the the crane? The construction crane!!! AHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!)

How an Outsider Views San Francisco’s Stolen Bike Lifestyle – Buying a Hot Ride at 7th and Market – Also, a BikeShare Station in the Twitterloin?

Wednesday, August 28th, 2013

This account of a journalist buying a stolen bike in the heart of Mayor Ed Lee’s gritty Twitterloin district isn’t new, but it’s new to me, so there you go.

Via Patrick Symms:

“Over the years, SFPD Sergeant McCloskey had launched dozens of stakeouts, stings, and reverse stings against bike thieves in the city’s Tenderloin District, becoming a legendary Lone Ranger in the bike wars, a one-man encyclopedia of cycle crime. He once spent an hour telling me his favorite techniques for catching thieves. The best spot was the San Francisco Public Library’s main branch, a few steps from Market Street. “We took a nice Cannondale and locked it to the bike rack there, set up a robbery detail, and watched the guys stealing the bikes,” he explained. “It worked really well. They’re very slick. They ride up on their own bike, park next to it. They have bolt cutters on a shoelace around their neck and lean down to cut it. They’re very fast. We did this successfully more than 20 times. We’ve only been skunked once. About 90 percent of the people we get are drug addicts, meth heads. Speeders, we call them.

In Portland, Joe Luiz had confessed that he’d never quite figured out where all the bikes were going, but in San Francisco this wasn’t an issue. Stolen bikes were for sale, openly, at Market and 7th, a block from where Sergeant McCloskey got so many stolen. 

I’d come to San Francisco for a funeral—my father-in-law had passed away. I drove downtown to pick up his ashes and, combining two errands into one, drove down Market Street to buy a stolen bike. I parked and walked to the corner of 7th, where there was an open-air market in fenced goods, from canned food to blue jeans to batteries.

The hot-bike market in downtown San Francisco was shameless, a disgrace to the city. But it wasn’t the Bay Area’s only dubious bicycle venue. The Alameda flea market was notorious for recycling stolen bikes, and in Golden Gate Park there was a chop shop where amateur mechanics swapped components and resold stolen bikes for profit.”

In related news:

city bike share at 7th and Market

Here it is, brand-new:

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Prediction: This station will be difficult and expensive to maintain. (Of course, the people behind Bay Area BikeShare already know this. And yet, they will be surprised by what will occur in this area. You’ll see.)