Archive for the ‘aircraft’ Category

This is the Large Bell 412 Helicopter That’s Flying Low Over Town Right Now – It’s Sniffing for Radiation – Super Bowl 50-Related?

Monday, February 1st, 2016

Whucka, whucka, whucka, whucka…

This National Nuclear Security Administration bird is shaking the building I’m in right now, oh well. This is what is looks like:

radiation-copter

And here’s a shot from Frisco – yesterday, closer to the Financh

Bell 412, baby!

Stay frosty, people!

Whucka, whucka, whucka, whucka…

San Francisco Bay Area Aerial Radiation Assessment Survey

Press Release
Jan 27, 2016

(SAN JOSE and SAN FRANCISCO, California) – A helicopter may be seen flying at low altitudes over portions of the San Francisco Bay Area from January 29 through February 6, 2016. The purpose of the flyovers is to measure naturally occurring background radiation.

Officials from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) announced that the radiation assessment will cover a collection of areas spanning approximately 22 square miles. A twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter, operated by the Remote Sensing Laboratory Aerial Measuring System from Nellis Air Force Base, will be equipped with radiation sensing technology. The helicopter will fly in a grid pattern over the areas at 150 feet (or higher) above the ground surface at a speed of approximately 80 miles per hour. Flyovers will occur only during daylight hours and are estimated to take about three hours to complete per area.

The measurement of naturally occurring radiation to establish baseline levels is a normal part of security and emergency preparedness. NNSA is making the public aware of the upcoming flights so that citizens who see the low-flying aircraft are not alarmed.

Follow NNSA News on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Flickr.

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Established by Congress in 2000, NNSA is a semi-autonomous agency within the U.S. Department of Energy responsible for enhancing national security through the military application of nuclear science. NNSA maintains and enhances the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile without nuclear explosive testing; works to reduce the global danger from weapons of mass destruction; provides the U.S. Navy with safe and effective nuclear propulsion; and responds to nuclear and radiological emergencies in the U.S. and abroad. Visit www.nnsa.energy.gov for more information.

A Rare, Non-Military C-130 Over Frisco: Lynden Air Cargo Lockheed L-100-30 Hercules Flying North, To Alaska

Wednesday, December 16th, 2015

These are some of the Lockheed C-130 military airplanes I’ve seen over town over the years, but this here Lynden Air Cargo Lockheed L-100 is the first civilian version I’ve ever spotted.

As seen looking south on Laguna:

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“X” Marks the Spot – Before JET FUEL CAN’T MELT STEEL BEAMS, We had CHEMTRAILS

Thursday, November 19th, 2015

Or contrails, as I call them…

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Still, I can’t help but wonder what’s exactly under that giant X, somewhere, over the rainbow

What It Looks Like When the Feds Do Slow Orbits Above the 94117, One Supposes

Tuesday, October 20th, 2015

The track of this airplane high over SF yesterday would look something like this

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I don’t know who else would be doing this kind of thing, is what I’m saying.

We can hear you Feds, the constant whine that doesn’t go away, that you can easily hear if there’s no traffic going by you.

Just saying…

Giant Cargo Plane Leaves Its Back Door Open – USAF C130, 2015 Fleet Week Airshow

Wednesday, October 14th, 2015

As seen above the 94117 – it reminded me of seeing this C-2A Greyhound flying about the Golden Gate Bridge one time.

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Everybody flies these C-130 birds – the Blue Angels, the Air Force, the Coast Guard. Even my dad drove them around, many years ago. But I guess we have too many?

I think we have too many, too many old ones, anyway.

Oh well.

The Drone Bros of Emerald Bay State Park go MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM…

Monday, September 21st, 2015

Ah let’s head back to nature. Do you see – it’s hard to spot:

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This is better:

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Here we go, at the bottom – there’s a clear shot:

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And then, back to its master:

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Are drones legal in California State Parks like 4.5 starred Emerald Bay?

Sure, for now.

That’s good, ’cause people be flying drones all over the place these days. (You’ll hear them before you see them, most likely. MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM…)

When You See, Hear, and Feel Fighter Jets Over Frisco, Most of the Time They’re These F/A-18’s from Naval Air Station Lemoore

Thursday, September 17th, 2015

As seen from the Marina Green, back in aught-13:

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Naval Air Station Lemoore, 93246

And he’s peeling off those dollar bills
Slapping them down
One hundred, two hundred
And I can see those fighter planes
And I can see those fighter planes

Flat-Hatting, 94129 – Flying So Close to the Presidio, People Could Read Your Registration Number, Except You Don’t Have One

Tuesday, August 18th, 2015

Flat-hatting.

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Altitude Restrictions –

  • Over Congested Areas – when over any city, town or settlement, a pilot shall maintain 1000’ above the highest obstacle within a horizontal distance of 2000’
  • Over other than congested areas – 500 AGL is the minimum altitude and must not get within 500 feet to any person, vessel or vehicle
  • Anywhere a plane is flying, he must have time to land if he has engine failure”

Press Release: “Asiana suit dismissal vindicates firefighters’ ‘heroic efforts’ in tragic crash, Dennis Herrera says”

Friday, August 7th, 2015

Just released, see below.

I don’t know. The NTSB weighed in and the SFFD certainly DID NOT get an A+ grade, to say the least:

“The overall triage process in this mass casualty incident was effective with the exception of the failure of responders to verify their visual assessments of the condition of passenger 41E.

The San Francisco Fire Department’s aircraft rescue and firefighting staffing level was instrumental in the department’s ability to conduct a successful interior fire attack and successfully rescue five passengers who were unable to self-evacuate amid rapidly deteriorating cabin conditions.

Although no additional injuries or loss of life were attributed to the fire attack supervisor’s lack of aircraft rescue and firefighting (ARFF) knowledge and training, the decisions and assumptions he made demonstrate the potential strategic and tactical challenges associated with having non-ARFF trained personnel in positions of command at an airplane accident.

Although some of the communications difficulties encountered during the emergency response, including the lack of radio interoperability, have been remedied, others, such as the breakdown in communications between the airport and city dispatch centers, should be addressed.

The Alert 3 section of the San Francisco International Airport’s emergency procedures manual was not sufficiently robust to anticipate and prevent the problems that occurred in the accident response.”

Here’s some more on Flight 214 from San Francisco Magazine. Some quotes in there from SFFD personnel appeared to show a bit of self deception, IMO.

And there’s this, from the San Jose Mercury News:

San Francisco’s emergency personnel also were criticized. While praising firefighters for rescuing several passengers from the burning wreckage and having more than the required number of personnel on hand, the report said “the arriving incident commander placed an officer in charge of the fire attack” who hadn’t been properly trained. The responders also had communication problems, including being unable “to speak directly with units from the airport on a common radio frequency” and didn’t rush medical buses to the scene, which “delayed the arrival of backboards to treat seriously injured passengers.” In addition, the report said airport emergency officials in general lack policies “for ensuring the safety of passengers and crew at risk of being struck or rolled over by a vehicle” during rescue operations. During the chaotic initial response to the Asiana crash, two firetrucks ran over one of the teenage passengers lying outside the plane. The San Mateo County coroner ruled the girl was alive when she was hit, but the San Francisco Fire Department disputes that finding.

Obviously, this was an aircraft accident that involved pilot error, as most do. Equally obviously, some of the problems on that day showed that the SFFD wasn’t training properly, realistically.

All right, here’s the release:

“Asiana suit dismissal vindicates firefighters’ ‘heroic efforts’ in tragic crash, Herrera says. City Attorney adds, ‘Our hearts go out to the parents of Ye Ming Yuan and to all the surviving loved ones of the three who lost their lives’ in 2013’s Asiana tragedy

SAN FRANCISCO (Aug. 7, 2015) — Parents of the 16-year-old passenger who was ejected and killed in the crash of Asiana Flight 214 on July 6, 2013 dismissed their civil lawsuit against the City and County of San Francisco today. Neither the plaintiffs nor their attorneys appear to have issued a public statement accompanying their dismissal, which was filed in U.S. District Court this afternoon.

City Attorney Dennis Herrera issued the following statement in response:

“Our hearts go out to the parents of Ye Ming Yuan and to all the surviving loved ones of the three who lost their lives in the tragic crash of Asiana Flight 214. We’re grateful for a dismissal that will spare everyone involved the added heartache and costs of litigation, which we believed from the beginning to be without legal merit.
“As we remember those who lost their lives in the Asiana crash, I hope we acknowledge, too, the heroic efforts of San Francisco’s firefighters and police who saved hundreds of lives that day. With thousands of gallons of venting jet fuel threatening unimaginable calamity, our firefighters initiated a daring interior search-and-rescue that within minutes extricated trapped passengers, and moved them safely to medical triage. In the face of great danger to their own lives, our emergency responders showed heroism and selflessness that day. They deserve our honor and gratitude.”

The National Transportation Safety Board determined that the crash of Asiana flight 214 was caused by the Asiana flight crew’s mismanagement in approaching and inadequately monitoring the airspeed of the Boeing 777 on its approach to San Francisco International Airport, according to the NTSB’s June 24, 2014 announcement. The NTSB also found that the flight crew’s misunderstanding of the autothrottle and autopilot flight director systems contributed to the tragedy.

On July 3, 2014, NTSB Member Mark R. Rosekind issued a concurrent statement that praised San Francisco’s first responders: “The critical role of the emergency response personnel at San Francisco International Airport (SFO) and the firefighters from the San Francisco Fire Department cannot be underestimated. Although certain issues regarding communications, triage, and training became evident from the investigation and must be addressed, emergency responders were faced with the extremely rare situation of having to enter a burning airplane to perform rescue operations. Their quick and professional action in concert with a diligent flight crew evacuated the remaining passengers and prevented this catastrophe from becoming much worse. In addition, the emergency response infrastructure and resources at SFO that supported firefighting and recovery after the crash are admirable, significantly exceeding minimum requirements.”

Asiana Flight 214 struck the seawall short of SFO’s Runway 28L shortly before 11:30 a.m. on Saturday, July 6, 2013, beginning a violent impact sequence that sheared off the tail assembly, rotated the aircraft approximately 330 degrees, and created a heavy cloud of dust and debris before the aircraft finally came to rest approximately 2300 feet from its initial site of impact. The sheared-off tail assembly and force of rotation resulted in the ejection of five people: two crewmembers still strapped into the rear jump seats, and three passengers seated in the last two passenger rows. All three ejected passengers suffered fatal injuries: two died at the scene, and one died six days later.

With nearly 3,000 gallons of jet fuel venting from fuel lines where two engines detached during the crash sequence, a fire started in one engines that was wedged against the fuselage. A fire also began in the insulation lining the fuselage interior, beginning near the front of the aircraft. The interior fire produced heavy smoke inside the aircraft and posed extremely dangerous conditions given the volatility of leaking jet fuel and its proximity to potentially explosive oxygen tanks. In the face of imminent explosion, the rescue effort safely evacuated and triaged of some 300 people. Asiana flight 214 carried 307 individuals: 4 flight crew, 12 cabin crewmembers and 291 passengers. Three of the 291 passengers were fatally injured.

The case is: Gan Ye and Xiao Yun Zheng, et al v. City and County of San Francisco, et al., U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, case no. C14-04941, filed Aug. 13, 2014. Learn more about the San Francisco City Attorney’s Office at http://www.sfcityattorney.org/.”

Tech Bros Use a Drone to Lasso Our Famous McKinley Statue with a Hula Hoop? Sure Looks That Way

Thursday, April 2nd, 2015

Of all the insults Bill McKinley has endured over the years, this has got to be the worst.

Don’t say side-boob, don’t say side-boob…

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Now if you filled the hula hoop up with something, there’s a chance that could you impart enough momentum to toss it up there.

But if this is just a regular, unaltered hoop, then a drone is prolly what these, these urban thugs used.

I am the ghost of Troubled Joe / Hoop’d by his pretty white neck / Some eighteen days ago

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And our somewhat corrupt RPD is now droneless, oh no!

I call for a General Atomics MQ-9 Reaper to loiter above the eastern portion of the GGP Panhandle, you know, an armed patrol, to show the tech bros that WE MEAN BUSINESS!

And who are the prime suspects? It’s these two, recently spotted loitering near the monument:

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And if not them, then it was this crew.

Courage.