Archive for the ‘architecture’ Category

Big-Ass Tent, Fell and Masonic Intersection, Golden Gate Park

Friday, September 16th, 2016

When you give to the needy, sound no trumpet before you, as the hypocrites do in the synagogues and in the streets, that they may be praised by others.”

Or not, your choice. (This is as wide angle as my Samsung phone can go – had to tilt it a bit.)


And once you’ve gained access to THE MIGHTY TENT, there’s another tent to aspire to, the “VIP TENT” what’s either inside of or attached to THE MIGHTY TENT.

The Walls Atop the Transamerica Pyramid are not as Solid as You Might Think

Thursday, September 15th, 2016

This crazy building gets super small at the top, so there’s little room for window washing rigging. What I thought was a solid wall is just some aluminum(?) paneling?


News to me…

Frisco is Like a Tiny New York City, So That’s Why We Have a Tiny Empire State Building Atop 505 Montgomery

Friday, July 29th, 2016


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Oh, it’s not the Empire State Building? OK fine, whatever:


If You Like Your Bridges without a Lot of Foofaraw, then the Alfred Zampa Memorial Bridge at Carquinez Strait is for You

Monday, July 11th, 2016

As seen on the I-80:

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You can’t get simpler than this…

EQUINOX: Frisco’s Most Beloved Shut-Down Restaurant – Sadly, It Stopped Revolving in May 2007

Friday, June 24th, 2016

I guess people went here for Prom Night? Anyway, they’re super nostalgic for our one and only formerly revolving restaurant.

“It’s been gone since May of 2007 and still there are reviews pouring in.”

Not much has changed since it closed. Here’s an update from 2009. And here’s how it looks now:

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One supposes the scaffolding has nothing to do with getting the thing to revolve again. Our Hyatt Regency Embarcadero sends workers up there to work on the famous Embarcadero Center Christmas / holiday lights sometimes. It looks like this:

And this:

But see for yourself – Time After Time was a horrible 1979 movie that you could have shot yourself. Check it out starting at 57:50. See? That was the Equinox.

(But don’t pay attention to the clumsy edits as you see the same background over and over.)

In mitigation, TAT was filmed on location, so it’s got that going for it:

Time After Time was filmed throughout San Francisco, including Cow Hollow, North Beach, the Hyatt Regency hotel, California Academy of Sciences in Golden Gate Park, the Marina District, Ghirardelli Square, Fisherman’s Wharf, the Richmond District, the Golden Gate Bridge, Grace Cathedral on Nob Hill, the Embarcadero Center, Chinatown, the Marina Green, the Palace of Fine Arts, Potrero Hill, and the Civic Center.

So that’s your update.

Oh, you can still go up there, but you have to pay a lot of money and be a hotel guest at the time. Or you have to make friends with a hotel guest and then pay $35 per visit.

Hey, how much would it take to get this place revolving as a restaurant again? Millions and millions prolly…

Ugliest Bridge in the World – Spanning the American River with False Arches – Designed by Committee

Thursday, June 9th, 2016

Here you go – the arches are decorative-only:

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File this one, this post-tensioned concrete box girder bridge under False Arch.


Saturday, May 14th, 2016

Here it is:

“FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: NEW SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF MODERN ART NOW OPEN – Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi and Mayor Edwin Lee Joined SFMOMA Director Neal Benezra, Board Chairman Charles Schwab and Board President Bob Fisher to Inaugurate Expanded Museum – More than 5,000 Visitors Welcomed to Museum For Free Today

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The new SFMOMA from Howard Street; photo by Devlin Shand, courtesy Drew Altizer Photography

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Charles Schwab, Robert Fisher, Neal Benezra and Nancy Pelosi, Edwin Lee and Craig Dykers; photo by Drew Altizer, courtesy Drew Altizer Photography

SAN FRANCISCO, CA (May 14, 2016)—With a blizzard of red confetti, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) opened its doors to the public today, May 14. Opening Day festivities were attended by local dignitaries, members of the Bay Area arts community and the general public. After the program, the first visitors were welcomed to the new museum by SFMOMA staff and leadership.

The program included remarks by Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi, Mayor Edwin Lee, SFMOMA Board Chairman Charles Schwab, SFMOMA Board President Bob Fisher and SFMOMA’s Helen and Charles Schwab Director Neal Benezra. The museum distributed more than 5,000 free timed tickets for Opening Day to the public. Surrounding cultural institutions including the Museum of the African Diaspora, the Contemporary Jewish Museum, the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, the Children’s Creativity Museum and many more throughout the Yerba Buena Cultural District also offered free admission and programming to celebrate the return of SFMOMA to the neighborhood.

“After years of planning and construction, it feels terrific to welcome visitors back to the museum,” said Neal Benezra. “With our goal of providing more art to more people, now and for generations to come, we are excited to share the new museum experience we have created that features the distinguished Doris and Donald Fisher Collection, new works gifted or promised to us by 230 generous donors and the Pritzker Center for Photography which deepens our commitment to the medium.”

SFMOMA, which opened today with 19 inaugural exhibitions, underwent a three-year transformation to add a 10-story expansion designed by international architecture firm Snøhetta that nearly triples its gallery space, allowing the museum to show more of its exceptional collection of modern and contemporary art. With free admission for guests ages 18 and younger and 45,000 square feet of free public space, SFMOMA is more open to the community than ever before.

“Today, with the opening of this gorgeous museum expansion, San Francisco affirms our city’s place as a global leader of art and culture,” said Congresswoman Pelosi. “The new SFMOMA is a manifestation of our city’s deep respect for creativity, and it embodies the spirit and the generosity of the entire Bay Area Community. For that, we are very proud, and very thankful indeed.”

“San Francisco is a city of big ideas, and SFMOMA is a really big idea—and now, a big reality,” said Mayor Lee. “Not only is the new SFMOMA a place to showcase innovative art, culture and education initiatives, but it is a piece of art itself in the Yerba Buena Art District. The museum is a major draw for visitors, residents, families and youth from around the world, and its contribution to the Bay Area economy will now grow significantly with its new expansion.”


SFMOMA’s Opening Day began with street performers on Howard Street including entertainment by the Circus Center, SFJAZZ High School All Stars, the San Francisco Youth Ballet Ribbon Dancers and We Talk Chalk.

After remarks, at the museum’s new entrance on Howard Street, the speakers and architect Craig Dykers, founding partner of Snøhetta, ceremonially opened the museum by pressing a large red button with the new SFMOMA logo on it, releasing a blizzard of red confetti from the roof of the new museum and adjacent buildings. The Golden State Warriors Aftershock Drumline played while SFMOMA staff members in red shirts paraded with large red balloons. Ribbon dancers from the San Francisco Youth Ballet led the first visitors into the building.|

Free admission on Opening Day was made possible in part by PG&E, a partner in making the new SFMOMA a model for energy efficiency for art museums through participation in the Step Up and Power Down and Savings by Design programs, The Yerba Buena Community Benefits District and the museum’s Premier Sponsors Bank of America and Cadillac.


SFMOMA is open to the public seven days a week from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. through Labor Day. Free public spaces open at 9 a.m. daily. The museum hosts extended hours on Thursdays until 9 p.m., giving visitors the opportunity to enjoy exhibitions and programs in the evening.

Annual membership begins at $100, and members enjoy unlimited free admission (with advance reservation). Adult admission to SFMOMA is $25 and admission for seniors 65 years and older is $22. Admission for visitors ages 19 through 24 is $19. SFMOMA provides free admission to all visitors 18 and younger, furthering its goal of building the next generation of art lovers.

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
151 Third Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

Founded in 1935 as the first West Coast museum devoted to modern and contemporary art, a thoroughly transformed SFMOMA features significantly enhanced gallery, education and public spaces. With six art-filled terraces, a new sculptural staircase and Roman steps where the public can gather, access to 45,000 square feet of free art-filled public space and free admission for visitors age 18 and younger, SFMOMA is more welcoming and more connected to San Francisco than ever before.

Visit or call 415.357.4000 for more information.

Irish Flags Fail to Drum Up Interest in the Twitterloin’s Hibernia Bank: “Entire Building For Lease, Entire Building For Lease”

Thursday, April 28th, 2016

All the deets from Peter Lawrence Kane

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But at least this building isn’t falling apart on the sidewalk anymore. Leave us travel all the way back to aught-nine:


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See where some bricks used to be, way up high?

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Here’s where some of them landed on the sidewalk of the west side of Jones Street:

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Do you ever want worried-looking police captains and firefighting battalion chiefs hanging out in front of your building in front of yellow tape? No, you do not:

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It was bird poo what hurt drainage what then caused damage to the building causing pieces to fall – that was the “pigeon theory” back in 2009.

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Ah, memories:

“…Hibernia Bank at 1 Jones Street, completed in 1892, was exceptionally advanced, not only for San Francisco but for the country at large. It appeared a year before the Chicago Columbian Exposition swept the nation with renewed appreciation for classical grandeur and order. With its crisp and dignified detailing, its scholarly composition and white Sierra granite walls, capped with a then-gilded dome, the bank appeared like a manifesto near the incoherent City Hall and the adjacent jumble of brick and wood commercial structures. Architect and Engineer reflected in 1909 that “the (Hibernia Bank) became famous at once and marked an epoch in San Francisco architecture and placed its designer in the forefront of his profession, where he has remained ever since. The building from the first to last shows no sign whatever of immaturity.”

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Concrete and Clay and General Decay: San Francisco Wants to Landmark Our Ugly Japantown Peace Pagoda?

Tuesday, October 13th, 2015

Here it is:

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IDK, Japantown has a sizeable seismic safety issue, non?

ICYMI, Japantown is nothing but an earthquake-unsafe concrete mess, courtesy of the idea of REDEVELOPMENT. If we cared more about people, we’d stop to think afore preserving the mistakes of the past…

Frisco’s Victorian Era Lighting Scheme: No LED’s Here – None Desired

Friday, July 3rd, 2015

I don’t mind LED lights myself, but others view them as modern hocus pocus

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But who knows, maybe this house will get LED’s (or better) one of these days…