Archive for the ‘art’ Category

Longbow, Pacific Heights

Monday, February 13th, 2017

Possibly for this.

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A Mural for the Inner Richmond featuring Bad Produce and Bad Weather? – MR FOGGY’s NEIGHBORHOOD

Thursday, February 9th, 2017

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50% Sade is Better than No Sade – A Dirt Cobain on Geary in Frisco’s Richmond District

Wednesday, February 8th, 2017

On Geary west of Masonic, which is Richmond enough for me.

Dirt Cobain:

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“Cherish the Day” is the fourth and final single by English band Sade from their fourth studio album, Love Deluxe (1992). It was released in the UK on July 31, 1993 and in the US on September 11, 1993. In the black and white shot music video, Sade Adu performs the song while playing a guitar on the rooftop of an NYC skyscraper as her bandmates and a few other people vibe to the music on the streets below. With the prominent views of the World Trade Center in most of the shots and with the coincidence of its US release date falling on September 11th, the music video for the single acts as an unintended tribute to the Twin Towers.

Word On The Street: “WE SHALL OVERCOMB !!!”

Monday, January 23rd, 2017

Is Donald Trump’s Hair a $60,000 Weave? A Gawker Investigation

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Fantastic Diane Arbus Photography Exhibit Opens at SFMOMA – See “in the beginning” Until April 2017

Monday, January 23rd, 2017

After a run in New York, about 100 small prints from Diane Arbus are now on display at our San Francisco Museum of Modern Art:

EXHIBITION
diane arbus
in the beginning
January 21–April 30, 2017
Floor 3

Do I know this guy? I think I know this guy:

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Diane Arbus’s “Jack Dracula at a bar, New London, Conn. 1961 – 17 1/4 x 14 1/4 in. (44 x 36 cm) – 
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, promised gift of Doon Arbus and Amy Arbus

Our new and improved SFMOMA has a lot of space solely dedicated to photography. If you live in Frisco, having at least an individual membership is a no-brainer

Anyway, you should check out this show before it leaves us on April 30th, 2017

“diane arbus
in the beginning
January 21–April 30, 2017
Floor 3

diane arbus: in the beginning considers the first seven years of the photographer’s career, from 1956 to 1962. A lifelong New Yorker, Arbus found the city and its citizens an endlessly rich subject for her art. Working in Times Square, the Lower East Side, and Coney Island, she made some of the most powerful portraits of the twentieth century, training her lens on the pedestrians and performers she encountered there. This exhibition highlights her early and enduring interest in the subject matter that would come to define her as an artist. It also reveals the artist’s evolution from a 35mm format to the now instantly recognizable and widely imitated look of the square format she adopted in 1962. Bringing together over 100 photographs from this formative period, many on display for the first time, diane arbus: in the beginning offers fresh insights into the distinctive vision of this iconic American photographer.”

This exhibition was organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Major support for diane arbus: in the beginning is provided by Lisa and John Pritzker. Generous support is provided by Randi and Bob Fisher and Sheri and Paul Siegel.

Pirate Bling, de Young Museum

Friday, January 20th, 2017

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Huge: SFMOMA, SFFS ANNOUNCE “WERNER HERZOG AND ECSTATIC TRUTH” Starts Feb 9 at SFMOMA’s Phyllis Wattis Theatre

Tuesday, January 10th, 2017

As much Werner Hertzog as you can possibly handle:

“SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF MODERN ART AND SAN FRANCISCO FILM SOCIETY ANNOUNCE WERNER HERZOG AND ECSTATIC TRUTH STARTING FEBRUARY 9 AT SFMOMA’S PHYLLIS WATTIS THEATER

Second Season of Modern Cinema Runs for Three Weekends in February and Explores the Nonfiction Work of Herzog and Several of His Contemporaries

SAN FRANCISCO, CA—The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) and the San Francisco Film Society (SFFS) announce the second season of Modern Cinema, the collaborative film series that explores the dynamic relationships between the past and present of cinema as one of the modern era’s essential art forms. Season two, entitled Werner Herzog and Ecstatic Truth, starts February 9, 2017, and is dedicated to the nonfiction work of legendary filmmaker Werner Herzog. It also includes important documentaries from other filmmakers that consider the world from a poetic, dream-infused and existential perspective. All screenings and talks take place in the newly renovated Phyllis Wattis Theater at SFMOMA, and several programs will feature special introductions by notable Bay Area figures, to be announced at a later date.

“For nearly 50 years, Werner Herzog has brought us amazing stories and images from the far ends of the earth and the limits of human experience,” said Dominic Willsdon, Leanne and George Roberts Curator of Education and Public Practice at SFMOMA, “It’s exciting to able to celebrate his work in this way, alongside other great hunters of rare and vivid truths.”

“Werner Herzog is a unique master of cinema, combining fiction and nonfiction filmmaking to make a bracingly fresh art form entirely his own,” said SFFS Executive Director Noah Cowan. “We have taken inspiration from him for our own unique collaboration with SFMOMA to bring a new perspective to the history and culture of cinema as a treasured art form, embedded within the larger story of art-making. It’s a perfect follow-up to the smash success of Modern Cinema’s first season, paying tribute to the Janus Films / Criterion library alongside the contemporary work of Apichatpong Weerasethakul.”

Modern Cinema seeks to highlight the ongoing dialogue between the critically acclaimed filmmakers of today—particularly those showcased in contemporary visual culture—and the great masters of cinema’s past, in an attempt to shine a light on the historical continuity and ongoing impact of this modern art form. The second season explores the boundaries of nonfiction filmmaking—between “fact” and “truth”—in the work of Herzog and in other canonical works in which the filmmaker’s powerful point of view similarly bends the rules of traditional documentary storytelling.

In his 2010 essay “On the Absolute, the Sublime, and Ecstatic Truth,” Herzog put forth his feelings about veracity in life and documentary filmmaking, stating that he “can only very vaguely begin to fathom the Absolute; I am in no position to define the concept.” Distinguishing between the factual and what he calls “ecstatic flash” of truth, he writes, “What moves me has never been reality, but a question that lies behind it: the question of truth.”

Taking Herzog’s idea of the Ecstatic Truth as its organizing principle, the second season of Modern Cinema combines a vast range of this master filmmaker’s documentaries with complementary works that operate along similar lines. A number of the films presented are seminal works from early in Herzog’s career. Whether it’s the unforgettable landscapes and nightmarish visions of Fata Morgana and Lessons of Darkness; the probing looks at preaching and spirituality in Huie’s Sermon, Wheel of Time and Pilgrimage; or some of his more recent investigations into the natural world, Herzog’s films almost always seek to surprise and provoke in how they approach their topics.

The films by other directors presented alongside Herzog’s work share some of his interests while reflecting their creators’ own particular styles. From idiosyncratic portraits of unique individuals (Shirley Clarke’s Portrait of Jason and Herzog’s Little Dieter Needs to Fly) to unforgettable depictions about spirituality (Philip Gröning’s Into Great Silence and Herzog’s Bells from the Deep) to behind-the-scenes stories of filmmaking itself (Les Blank’s Burden of Dreams and Herzog’s My Best Fiend), the subjects presented in Werner Herzog and Ecstatic Truth offer visionary realizations of nonfiction work.

WEEK ONE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9
6 p.m.—Burden of Dreams (Les Blank, USA, 1982, 95 min.)
8:30 p.m.—Grizzly Man (Werner Herzog, USA, 2005, 104 min.)

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10
6 p.m.—The Great Ecstasy of the Woodcutter Steiner with How Much Wood Could a Woodchuck Chuck (Werner Herzog, Germany, 1972/1976, TRT 92 min.)
8:30 p.m.—The Gleaners and I (Agnès Varda, France, 2000, 82 min.)

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 11
3 p.m.—Jag Mandir: The Eccentric Private Theatre of the Maharaja of Udaipur (Werner Herzog, Austria/Germany, 1991, 85 min.)
5 p.m.—Bells from the Deep with Pilgrimage (Werner Herzog, Germany/UK, 1993/2001, TRT 78 min.)
8:30 p.m.—My Winnipeg (Guy Maddin, Canada, 2007, 80 min.)

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 12
3:30 p.m.—Into Great Silence (Philip Gröning, Germany, 2006, 162 min.)
7:30 p.m.—Lessons of Darkness with La Soufrière (Werner Herzog, France/Germany, 1992/1977, TRT 83 min.)

WEEK TWO

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16
6 p.m.—Land of Silence and Darkness (Werner Herzog, Germany, 1971, 85 min.)
8:15 p.m.—Poto and Cobengo (Jean-Pierre Gorin, USA/Germany, 1980, 73 min.)

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17
6 p.m.—Fata Morgana (Werner Herzog, Germany, 1971. 79 min.)
8 p.m.—Gates of Heaven (Errol Morris, USA, 1978, 83 min.)

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18
3 p.m.—Goshogaoka (Sharon Lockhart, USA/Japan, 1997, 63 min.)
5 p.m.—Into the Abyss: A Tale of Death, A Tale of Life (Werner Herzog, USA, 2011, 107 min.)
8 p.m.—Encounters at the End of the World (Werner Herzog, USA, 2007, 99 min.)

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19
3 p.m.—God’s Angry Man with Huie’s Sermon (Werner Herzog, Germany, 1980, TRT 87 min.)
5:15 p.m.—Close-Up (Abbas Kiarostami, Iran, 1990, 97 min.)
8 p.m.—The Emperor’s Naked Army Marches On (Kazuo Hara, Japan, 1987, 122 min.)

WEEK THREE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23
6 p.m.—Wodaabe: Herdsmen of the Sun (Werner Herzog, France, 1989, 52 min.)
7:30 p.m.—The Lion Hunters with The Mad Masters (Jean Rouch, France, 1965/1955, TRT 105 min.)

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24
6 p.m.—Cave of Forgotten Dreams (Werner Herzog, Canada, 2011, 90 min.)
8:30 p.m.—Happy People: A Year in the Taiga (Werner Herzog and Dmitry Vasyukov, Germany, 2010, 90 min.)

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25
3 p.m.—Portrait of Jason (Shirley Clarke, USA, 1967, 105 min.)
5:30 p.m.—A Man Vanishes (Shôhei Imamura, Japan, 1967 130 min.)
8:30 p.m.—My Best Fiend (Werner Herzog, Germany, 1999, 95 min.)

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26
5:30 p.m.—Wheel of Time (Werner Herzog, Germany, 2003, 80 min.)
7:30 p.m.—Little Dieter Needs to Fly (Werner Herzog, Germany, 1997, 80 min.)

Tickets and Information
General public tickets are $12 and will be available online as of 10 a.m., January 17, 2017, or onsite at SFMOMA during regular business hours. Modern Cinema tickets do not include admission to SFMOMA galleries. Ticket-holders for Modern Cinema should enter through the museum’s Joyce and Larry Stupski Entrance on Minna Street (between Third and New Montgomery Streets). For up-to-date program information and tickets, visit sfmoma.org/modern-cinema.

About the Phyllis Wattis Theater at SFMOMA
As part of the opening of the new and expanded SFMOMA in May 2016, the Phyllis Wattis Theater also received a major renovation and system update creating one of the most enjoyable places to see film in the Bay Area. A new, state-of-the-art NEC digital projector offers Modern Cinema the ability to present films on a 24 x 12-foot screen with the capacity to show aspect ratios of 1:37, 1:66, 1:85 and 2:39. The Wattis Theater can also screen films via new Kinoton projectors in 16 and 35mm formats. Because sound is integral to the cinematic experience, a new Meyer Sound Cinema Surround System enhances the nuance and precision intended by the filmmaker. Comfortable new seating with cup holders round out the Wattis Theater experience.

Supporters
Modern Cinema’s Founding Supporters are Carla Emil and Rich Silverstein. Generous support is provided by Nion T. McEvoy and the Susan Wildberg Morgenstein Fund.

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
SFMOMA is dedicated to making the art for our time a vital and meaningful part of public life. Founded in 1935 as the first West Coast museum devoted to modern and contemporary art, a thoroughly transformed SFMOMA, with triple the gallery space, an enhanced education center and new public galleries, opened to the public on May 14, 2016.
www.sfmoma.org

San Francisco Film Society

The San Francisco Film Society champions the world’s finest films and filmmakers through programs anchored in and inspired by the spirit and values of the San Francisco Bay Area. Building on a legacy of nearly 60 years of bringing the best in world cinema to the local audiences, SFFS is now a national leader in film exhibition, media education and filmmaker services.

The Film Society presents more than 100 days of exhibition each year, reaching a total audience of more than 100,000 people. Its acclaimed education program introduces international, independent and documentary cinema and media literacy to more than 10,000 teachers and students. Through Filmmaker360, the Film Society’s filmmaker services program, essential creative and business services, and funding totaling millions of dollars are provided to deserving filmmakers at all stages of their careers.

The Film Society seeks to elevate all aspects of film culture, offering a wide range of activities that engage emotions, inspire action, change perceptions and advance knowledge. A 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation, it is largely donor and member supported. Membership provides access to discounts, private events and a wealth of other benefits

For more information: sffs.org

This press release is available online at sffs.org/press/releases.

Word on the Street: ART IS EASY

Wednesday, December 21st, 2016

Fell Street:

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Official Governmental Art Gets Credit for ACKNOWLEDGING ISSUES in Mid Market ‘n Stuff, But How Does It Help?

Friday, December 2nd, 2016

If you consider graffiti to be a leading indicator for life on the street, then our San Francisco Arts Commission would appear to be a lagging indicator. As seen in the Twitterloin:

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As Always, “SF VS. TRUMP” – General Douglas MacArthur Tunnel, The Presidio – Or Rather, “SF Hearts Trump?”

Monday, November 28th, 2016

As seen last week heading toward the Golden Gate Bridge:

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But apparently this was changed to “SF Hearts Trump” the past couple of days?

On It Goes