Archive for the ‘bikes’ Category

Presenting the Newish Sidewalks of Arguello in the Presidio: The “Arguello Gap Closure Project”

Wednesday, July 16th, 2014

I’ll tell you man, at first I didn’t notice this change on Arguello in the Presidio, the Arguello Gap Closure Project.

Click to expand

Anyway, enjoy.

Improves pedestrian and bicyclist safety by widening road to provide:

• New pedestrian path
• New bike lanes with lane markings and  signage
• Addresses gap in pedestrian and bicycle network between southern portion of the Presidio with the Main Post
• Relocation of street lights
• Updated storm drain infrastructure”

The Big Swinging Dick of the Panhandle Bike Path – Wheels Fully One Yard Tall – Presenting the Dirty-Sixer

Monday, July 7th, 2014

Fun with Dick and Janes – see how small their MTB wheels are in comparison?

See Dick

See Dick go

Go Dick go!

It’s the second Dirty Sixer I’ve ever seen…

San Francisco Bicycle Riders Demonstrate the Idaho Stop at the Bottom of a Steep Hill

Monday, July 7th, 2014

A “California Stop” occurs when a driver or cyclist slows down for a stop sign, but does not come to a full stop at any particular instant. This certainly is an aspect of traffic culture in San Francisco and it’s one that’s tolerated by the SFPD. For example, motorcycle-riding cops will sometimes lie in wait on Pierce as car after car commits a California Stop coming down Alamo Heights on Fulton. Maybe ten people go through without incident but then somebody rolls through at 7 MPH and the driver gets pulled over. Just watch the police themselves cruising around in cars and on bikes to see how fast they go past the red octagon, depending on traffic, visibility, time of day, etc. California Stops aren’t tolerated as much in other places, such as the small towns of Marin County. And, oh yes, this approach is also known as an “Oklahoma Stop” in other parts of the country.

OTOH, an “Idaho Stop” occurs when a cyclist doesn’t slow down at all for a stop sign.

Thusly, near Twin Peaks:

Look for Idaho Stops in the Lower Haight area, where many fixed gear riders maintain the same pace whether cycling past stop signs or not.

Some people in San Francisco want Idaho Stops to be legal in San Francisco.

Would that be a good thing?

New “Upshift” Company Delivers a Rental Car to You – It’s the “Uber of Carshare” – It’s Bicycle-Assisted Car Rentals

Friday, July 4th, 2014

Upshift is here, or at least it’s here in the Russian Hill and Nob Hill areas.

Here’s how it works:

“1. TAP A BUTTON – Anywhere in San Francisco. Get a car for the day with one tap. It’s that easy.

2. GET A CAR DELIVERED – Get a Small, Medium, Large, or Luxury vehicle delivered in 60 minutes. You drive it for the day & our driver rides off on a bike! Introductory rates from $49/day.

3. LEAVE IT ANYWHERE – Drop it off wherever you like in the city. We’ll come pick it up. That’s it. You’re done.”

So your rent-a-car will arrive double-parked at your front door with a green Bianchi or whatever on top and an inner-city sweathog inside. The Upshifter will simply hand you the keys and then pedal away.

Thusly:

(I’ll note that bicycle theft is an issue in San Francisco, just saying. Who’ll be the first Upshifter to lose his/her ride?)

All right, all the deets:

“Upshift is an exclusive, members only car club. Get the freedom of owning a private car with the luxury and convenience of a car service. Push a button, get a hybrid, SUV, or luxury car delivered. You drive it for a day. We pick it up when you’re done. No need to return to the same location as long as it’s in our zone (includes all of the core areas of San Francisco). We professionally operate a fleet of cars out of a single garage. Cars can only be taken out by the day only to start. Subscription pricing and recurrent bookings (eg, deliver a car every Tuesday at 7 am) for regular usage needs. The main limitation of carshare today is parking, not vehicle cost.”

Founded by Ezra Goldman. Who’s that?

“MCP, @MIT & PhD dropout. Co-founded a bikeshare in 1999. Piaggio shared EV scooters at MIT Media Lab in 2006. 2 years managing a startup in Copenhagen”

Upshift is the Uber of Carshare

Upshift makes getting out of town easy. Just push a button on your phone, get a car for the day delivered to your door, and get out of town. We’ll pick it up again anywhere in the city when you’re done, even at a different location from where we delivered, enabling a “one way” service. Payment is all done through your Upshift account, with no cash or card transactions and no paperwork.

Your next car fits in your pocket. And someday, it will drive itself to your door.

Upshift provides club members great cars on demand at the push of a button. We’ll pick up and drop off anywhere in the city- even in two different locations for one way service. Upshift provides more convenience and flexibility than car leasing with less cost, commitment and hassle.

We have spent over 2 years developing the model and getting backing from the world’s best carshare, autotech, and insurance experts around the world. Carsharing takes 9-13 cars off the road for each car we put on the road, unlocking new park space for more livable cities. We enable a transition to a car-free urban lifestyle, taking 1M cars off the streets, to save 10B pounds of CO2 per year by disrupting the car leasing market.

Upshift Twitter

Upshift FaceBook

Well, welcome to town, Upshift.

The Craziest Bicycle I’ve Ever Seen in San Francisco: The Fortune Hanebrink All-Terrain Bike – Ride It to the South Pole

Wednesday, July 2nd, 2014

This is one of them “ice bikes” from Fortune Hanebrink.

Or something.

Use it to tow your sledge to the South Pole.

As seen a few years back in the Western Addition:

Click to expand

All the deets:

“Engineered and handcrafted 8000 ft above sea level in Big Bear Lake, California, HANEBRINK Electric All-Terrain vehicles are the confluence of ingenuity, ecology, and luxury. The capabilities of the HANEBRINK are as limitless as your own sense of adventure; as a commuter vehicle, it is smooth and dynamic.

Nearly 10 years ago, national champion cyclist, bicycle innovator, and NASA aerospace engineer, Dan Hanebrink was approached by an Arctic explorer looking for an alternative to skis that could take him and his equipment across the icy terrain of Antarctica. Hanebrink created a bicycle unlike anything ever built before. The original “Ice Bike” by HANEBRINK had no plastic parts and used superfat, low-pressure tires that devoured all surfaces in all conditions silently and effortlessly. Today, our drive to create innovative outdoor recreational vehicles continues and is reflected in our mission to satisfy and serve the adventurous worldwide.

The HANEBRINK Electric All-Terrain Vehicle is the evolution of the original, revolutionary HANEBRINK design, combining state-of-the art green technology with an on-demand hybrid electric system and the latest in bicycle technology. Crank the throttle and the 600 watt motor powers the HANEBRINK to speeds up to 20 mph. If you want to go faster, just start pedaling.

Three design features help the HANEBRINK achieve outstanding on and off-road performance.

• The widest tires in the industry. The 20 x 8 inch tires radically increase the surface area where rubber meets road for enhanced stability at all speeds, added traction on rough terrain, and unprecedented float on sand and snow.

• A mid-mounted, bracket supported motor optimizes the vehicle’s center of gravity beneath the rider and enables tight turns, rapid weight shifting, and provides more stability.

• 14 speed gearing tuned for a wide variety of surfaces, grades, and utility applications including a low range capable of carrying up to 300 pounds of bulky cargo up steep terrain or deep into inaccessible areas.

With a single Lithium ion battery (LiFePO4), the HANEBRINK has a one hour run time and three hour recharge. For longer excursions, the rear rack can be fitted with up to five lithium ion batteries, a run time of over 5 hours and more than 100 miles of riding. The wide rear rack is standard HANEBRINK equipment and can hold up to 100 pounds of cargo.

The HANEBRINK can truly go anywhere on the planet while maintaining minimal environmental impact and zero-carbon emissions. Where can you go with one?”

How Crazy are the Newly-Striped Lanes on JFK Drive in Golden Gate Park? Contra-Flow Dog-Walking Lane

Monday, June 30th, 2014

Well, I’ll tell you, the SFMTA-sponsored restriping of the eastern section of JFK Drive in Golden Gate Park is pretty crazy.

So different and strange new things occur there all the time  - it’s amazing.

Do you think this dog skatewalker goes against traffic with eight critters anywhere else in the world? 

Here’s public radio:

Why One San Francisco Bike Lane Design Is Upsetting Drivers and Cyclists

And here’s the San Francisco Bay Guardian:

New JFK bike lanes are bad for everyone

Can’t the SFMTA simply fix matters by admitting defeat and putting the old stripes back in?

I don’t know if it can, you know, ideologically.

The SFMTA Wants to Remove Ever More Parking from Folsom Street: Presenting the Folsom-Essex Bikeway “Improvement” Project

Wednesday, June 18th, 2014

Here it is, via the Rincon Hill Blog, it’s  the “Folsom-Essex Bikeway Improvement Project.”

Speaking as somebody with more hours, years, decades and miles on bikes in San Francisco County than any SFMTA Livable Streets person or SFMTA Project Manager or, really, anybody at the sainted SFMTA (with the possible exception of one or two $25 an hour interns that they might have recently hired on), many times what the SFMTA calls an IMPROVEMENT actually doesn’t turn out to be an improvement.

But at that point, the SFMTA becomes seemingly powerless to fix its mistakes, oh well.

Anyway, the project manager behind this effort doesn’t care – all s/he cares about is pushing this thing through. If the project gets approved, that’s success and if it doesn’t, that’s failure. It’s as simple as that.

Oh well. I’ll check out this situation next time I’m down there

All the deets:

“The SoMa area is experiencing rapid residential and commercial  growth, and is poised to be among the neighborhoods with the highest  bicycle ridership in San Francisco.  With bicycling increasing as a means of transportation in SoMa and  throughout the city, the San Francisco Municipal Transportation  Agency (SFMTA) is working with the community to increase the safety  and comfort of city streets for people biking, while also better  organizing our city’s roadways for all modes of travel.

Current Situation
Currently, people bicycling eastbound on Folsom Street must navigate  a difficult segment between 2nd and 1st streets where they are forced  to ride in a narrow bike lane sandwiched between lanes of vehicle  traffic and merge with freeway-bound vehicles.

Proposed Solution
To enhance bicycle safety and better organize the roadway, the  SFMTA proposes to move the Folsom bike lane curbside to eliminate  the need for people bicycling to merge with heavy volumes of freeway  bound vehicles. The agency will also install a dedicated bicycle traffic  signal at the Essex Street intersection to separate through bicyclists  from right-turning vehicles and special markings to provide clear  direction on where motorists can expect bicyclists to be riding.

Realigning the bikeway will require the removal of seven metered parking  spaces on the south side of Folsom Street just east of 2nd Street.

A public hearing on this project will be held on Friday, June 20th at  10:00 AM in City Hall, Room 416.

Please contact Ellen Robinson of the SFMTA at (415) 701-4322 or Ellen.Robinson@sfmta.com with any questions or comments.”

I am writing to let you and the SBRMBNA know about an improvement to the city’s bike network planned for the Folsom Street between 1st and 3rd streets. The bike lane on this stretch has multiple jogs where eastbound bicyclists and freeway-bound motorists must weave. SFMTA proposes to remedy this by moving the bike lane curbside between 2nd and Essex, with a new bike traffic signal to manage the Folsom/Essex intersection. The project will require removing seven metered parking spaces on Folsom Street. There is a public hearing for this change on Friday, June 20th, for which we have placed postings in the project vicinity. The attached flyer provides a summary of the project and details on the public hearing. Please let me know if you have any questions or comments.

Ellen Robinson, PE
SFMTA Livable Streets
1 S Van Ness Avenue, 7th Floor
San Francisco, CA 94103″

Scene From Under The Interstate: In San Francisco, Bicycle Theft Isn’t Just a Gig, It’s a Lifestyle

Monday, June 2nd, 2014

Rent-free living under the I-80:

Click to expand

On It Goes…

Drivers at Fell and Masonic Need to be More Aggressive Heading North and Less Heading South

Thursday, May 22nd, 2014

Allow me to explain, Gentle Reader.

This driver’s heading south on Masonic. See what s/he did? S/he “blocked the box” because of carelessness. You gotta look ahead to see if the intersection will clear by the time your light turns red. It’s Da Law. This is what I mean when I say too aggressive.

On the other hand, drivers heading north on Masonic sometimes want to turn left onto Fell. Sometimes these people don’t commit to making the turn by entering the intersection. Instead, they hang back by the crosswalk about 40 feet from where they should be, srlsy. Ppl, you gotta commit to the turn, you gotta be more aggressive.

D’accord? 

D’accord!

The Valley, 2014

Thursday, May 22nd, 2014

These things work indoors as well