Archive for the ‘bikes’ Category

The Valley, 2014

Thursday, May 22nd, 2014

These things work indoors as well

The Amazing Polluting Mopeds of San Francisco’s Mission District

Wednesday, May 21st, 2014

Forget about the high-heeled scooter riders of yesteryear. We have more important business now.

This one’s a little tough to spot at first, but if you click to expand this photo, you’ll see the telltale blue smoke of a gasoline-and-oil-burning two-stroke Peugeot moped on Valencia Street in the Sunny Mission district.

Depending on the state of tune, you can have something like half of the fuel and oil you put in spewed out the tailpipe unburned.

Tuk tuk tuk tuk tuk tuk….

Such are the ways of aging two-stroke engines.

So fashion has a price, after all.

Vrooom, vrooom.

The Fattest Bicycle Tires You’ll Ever See – Presenting the Mighty 26 x 4.0 – It’s Like a Motorcycle Without an Engine

Tuesday, May 20th, 2014

As seen on Ashbury:

Click to expand

Clearly, the Crew at StreetBlog Doesn’t Know How to Persuade a Non-Believer – It’s Clear – Clearly

Thursday, May 15th, 2014

Leave us begin:

I have:

More miles,

More hours,

More years, and

More decades

on a bicycle in San Francisco County than anybody at the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition, at WalkSF, and at the StreetsBlog (And to that tally you can also add driving vehicles and walking around and, perhaps, riding transit as well.

Just saying,

Now with that out of the way, let’s talk about how to win arguments, which actually means how to persuade people, but IRL in this town, it turns out to mean how to preach to the converted.

For example, we have this.

Note the use of the word “clear” here:

Now, here’s why you shouldn’t ever use the word clear or clearly or anything similar when you are “trying to win arguments” about anything:

Clearly—It is common to see briefs with statements like “Clearly, the defendant is wrong,” or “Clearly, that is not the law.” It is ironic, but the statement that follows “clearly” is usually not clear. What follows is usually some conclusory, ipse dixit statement that is subject to question. So the word “clearly” weakens your argument. The same is true of its allies: obviously, undeniably, plainly, patently, undoubtedly and incontestably. You are better off omitting those words. Your writing will be stronger, because courts reflexively question what follows when they see “clearly” or its allies.”

Just pasting.

Do you, Gentle Reader, know about the pedestrian bulb-out that is/was at the relevant corner of Sixth and Folsom, and how it differs from the similar southwest corners of Fifth and Folsom and Fourth and Folsom? Was the driver of the big rig supposed to pull into the narrow bike line to make the turn? IDK. Are diagrams out there that show how the accident occurred? Is the DA supposed to bring cases he thinks he’s going to lose?

Mmm…

You might know how to argue, but you don’t know how to persuade – that’s the problem.

Just saying.

Oak Street Blues: What Happens to Your Bike When You Lock It Up in Appointed Mayor Ed Lee’s San Francisco

Thursday, May 15th, 2014

So yeah, the chain and the padlock worked, but you’re going to need some way of keeping the wheels attached, when the freaks come out, at night.

Click to expand

In mitigation, this ride wasn’t all that expensive to begin with…

Lesson: You Gotta Lock That Down

Two Cars Parked Next to Each Other on JFK Drive in Golden Gate Park: You’ll Never Guess Which is Legally Parked in the Handicapped Zone

Monday, May 12th, 2014

Begin now:

Oh, what’s that, do both cars have valid handicapped placards displayed? Yes.

Begin again:

Click to expand

Time’s up!

Did you pick the car on the right? ‘Cause, you know, the driver parked right by the blue sign and next to the blue paint, right? You know, the way s/he’s done it hundreds of times before in the state of Califoria.

But SURPRISE! JFK Drive is a part of SFMTA Crazy Land, where up is down and left is right, where you’re supposed to follow the blue diagonal lines to the correct place to park, which is close to the middle of the street.

The handicapped driver of the car on the right, who made an honest mistake, let’s assume, gets awarded a fat ticket worth three figures for losing this quiz.

Check it:

Hey, do cyclists like the new bike lanes on JFK Drive?

No, not really.

Oh well.

When is an SFPD “Sting” Operation NOT an Actual Sting Operation? It’s When the Motor Patrol Works “The Wiggle” on BTWD 2014

Friday, May 9th, 2014

Ah, Bike To Work Day, that special day when the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition can bask in the glory that it endorsed the election of appointed Mayor Ed Lee. (Hey, did you know that he was the first Asian-American appointed Mayor of San Francisco? He’s very proud of that, all those years of obsequiousness plus the outright lying required to pull that one off.)

Anywho, this was the scene last night at the intersection of the so-called Wiggle bike route through the Lower Haight area.

One SFPD buckethead was stationed at this corner of Waller and Steiner and the other was cattywumpus across the street snaring those who blew threw the stop sign even while the SFPD is yelling, “Stop sign, stop sign.”

Simply, there was no element of deception involved so, ergo, this cannot have been a sting operation. Case closed.

The cyclists were cautious and confused, mostly. They didn’t know how long to stop. Some stayed there for like ten seconds trying to remember how to signal a left turn. Traffic backed up a bit, as you can see:

Click to expand

Anyway, the bike coalition people called up SFPD  higher-ups to see if there was a “sting operation” going on but of course they said no, because, as stated, this kind of thing isn’t a sting operation.

Oh, here’s Officer Scott’s ride from last night. Ask him about his “Porsche 996″ (aka 911)  sports car and get his opinion about whether he considers it a “modern Porsche.” I’m sure he’ll have an answer.

Oh, I saw scores of cyclists and two cops – here’s the racial makeup:

SFPD: 100% African American

Cyclists: 100% Caucasian*

People, you oughtta stay off the Wiggle – you can easily avoid it by turning a block sooner or a block later.

And oh, do you think Officer Scott loves it, just loves it when you all take to the Twitter? Indeed he does.

All right, ’til next time…

* You know, rounding up. Oh, you’re 1/32nd Cherokee or one-quarter Chippewa? Good for you, Caucasian! Good for you.

DON’T MISS THIS! – Short “Oak Street Bicycle Red Light” Video – People Behaving Badly, Stanley Roberts

Friday, May 9th, 2014

I’m a little too close to this one, so I wasn’t sure if this kind of thing would be People Behaving Badly-worthy.

Well, obvs, it is now:

I don’t know how intentional the Great Oak Street Airlock is, you know, how the lights are poorly timed for traffic on Oak but also poorly-timed for cyclists using the Panhandle bike path to get on to Oak and beyond. I suspect that “teaching drivers a lesson” about how they shouldn’t be driving might be involved, but it also could be incompetence/neglect.

Speaking of which, just try to find a street sign what says “Baker” at Oak and Baker these days. Shouldn’t like SFGov like care enough about tourists ‘n stuff to like put up just one fucking street sign at an intersection? Yes, but it’s been this way for months. (If I were Ron Conway AND if I cared enough I could make a one-minute phone call to get the wheels rolling on the let’s-give-Baker-street-signs-what-say-Baker-street project, but I’m not so oh well.)

Anyway, enjoy.

San Francisco-Based Strava Introduces New Data Service “to Support Better Bicycling Worldwide”

Wednesday, May 7th, 2014

Here’s the latest:

“Strava Introduces New Data Service to Support Better Bicycling Worldwide

Strava Metro Provides Detailed Insight into Local Cycling Activity

SAN FRANCISCO, May 7, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — Strava, the online network connecting the global community of athletes, has announced Strava Metro, a new service that allows insight and analysis of bicycling routes and commute patterns around the world. The service empowers advocacy organizations and government agencies to understand cycling activity in local communities and make better-informed decisions when planning, maintaining, and upgrading bicycling infrastructure.

http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnvar/20140507/85541

Strava Metro leverages the activity uploads of millions of Strava members worldwide, anonymized and aggregated to protect privacy, to bring the process of collecting cycling traffic data into the digital age. With more than 2.5 million new GPS-tracked activities added each week, Strava’s data set of over 300 billion GPS points offers an entirely new way of understanding and analyzing cycling traffic at a local level.

“Bicycling safety is a top concern to our members worldwide, especially when they’re riding through metropolitan areas with a high concentration of motor vehicle traffic,” said Michael Horvath, co-founder and president at Strava. “Strava Metro delivers an innovative way for us to serve Strava members and non-members alike by helping to make their daily commutes and weekend rides smoother and safer.”

Organizations in the following areas are currently analyzing data from Strava Metro including the Oregon Department of Transportation and the cities of Alpine Shire, Australia; Arlington, Va.; Glasgow, Scotland; London, England and Orlando, Fla.

“Our goal is to provide a safe, efficient transportation system in Oregon which includes sustainable transportation options such as bicycling, walking and taking public transit,” said Margi Bradway, active transportation policy lead at Oregon Department of Transportation. “Strava Metro data will help us understand how and where cyclists are riding in Oregon, a critical component to evaluating the transportation system and planning for the future.”

Strava Metro is available today. Advocacy organizations and the general public can access high-resolution heatmap visualizations of the data free of charge. Organizations seeking deeper insight and analysis will be able to license Strava Metro data sets for use with geographic information systems (GIS) mapping software. Pricing is based on the number of Strava members in the requested geographic area. To learn more about Strava Metro visitmetro.strava.com.

About Strava
Strava is the online network that connects the global community of athletes. Founded in 2009, millions of athletes have joined Strava for the competition and camaraderie found in tracking and sharing their fitness activities. The company’s free mobile apps and website help members discover and plan workouts, record and share activities, and analyze and compare performance. Strava’s ability to connect athletes around the world makes fitness a more social experience, providing extra motivation even when training alone. www.strava.com

For more information, contact:
Michael Oldenburg
press@strava.com

Photo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140507/85541

SOURCE  Strava

Photo:http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140507/85541
http://photoarchive.ap.org/
Strava

Web Site: http://www.strava.com

Is Riding Your Bike Up Masonic on Excessively Wide Sidewalks a Good Idea? Just Ask These Two, or Most Everybody Else

Friday, May 2nd, 2014

The answer is hell to the yes, hombre/a.

This is how most people do it, actually. Some use the northbound sidewalks starting around Fulton and then they get back where they belong on the street when they get past Turk, where things flatten out near the blood bank, is what some people do.

Click to expand

The SFMTA or some other alphabet soup org is going to change Masonic fairly soon, based upon surveys of people 70% of whom just happened to be/have been members of the local bicycle coalition, and somehow this makes the proposed changes “non-controversial,” or something.

MUNI will run slower, that’s for sure.