Archive for the ‘education’ Category

Gonna Go on an Escapade: JEFFERSON UNION HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT Car Far from Home, Illegally Parked in the 94104

Monday, February 16th, 2015

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Escapade
We’ll have a good time
Escapade
Leave your worries behind
Escapade
Well you could be mine
Escapade
An escapade

(My roommates in colledge used to dance on the floor, while seated, with arms flailing, to this song, and it wasn’t all that old at the time, that’s how old I am.)

What Happens When You Pay $40k a Year to Send Your Kid to Private School in Haight Ashbury

Thursday, January 22nd, 2015

This happens.

NTTAWWT, but smoking in Golden Gate Park is agin the rules…

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Oh, and parents, please “expect a five percent tuition increase per year,” ’cause, you know, what’s another ten thou, right? C’mon, that’s chicken feed!

A 315-Seat Theatre Coming to Haight Ashbury? Admission Will Cost $40K per Year – “Urban School” Hearing on January 22

Friday, January 9th, 2015

Those who’d like to yammer about this project are welcome to waste their time come January 22, 2015.

Read all about it.

(Man, that Urban School has some expensive tuition.)

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“Tuition                         $38,100
Laptop Fee                       $620
Total Charges            $38,720

In budgeting for four years of an Urban education, parents can expect annual tuition increases. The average tuition increase has been 4.2% per year, over the last five years.

For many families, the cost of an independent secondary education may seem overwhelming at first. To assist families in making this important investment in their child’s future, Urban has developed several payment options, including monthly payments, a loan program, and a financial aid program:

Plan 1: Tuition is paid in two installments: Payment 1 by July 1 ($25,260) and Payment 2 by January 1 ($9,650).

Plan 2: Tuition is paid in 10 installments, May to February ($3,491). 

Loan Program: A family may borrow up to the total cost of an Urban education, less any financial aid received. The repayment period extends from 24-84 months, and there are no prepayment penalties.”

OMG, Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism Will Soon Have a New Outpost in San Francisco? Per Dean Hamm

Thursday, November 6th, 2014

Here’s the news from the AP’s Tomoko Hosaka:

“Woah. Medill Dean Hamm says the school will soon announce new outpost in San Francisco.”

Woah, indeed.

Does this man look like a liar? I think not.

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Look out SFSU and UCB – you’re getting some more competition, looks like…

News Release: “Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom’s Statement on the University of California’s Threat to Increase Tuition Fees”

Thursday, November 6th, 2014

It’s on. Here’s Gav’s reply to this recent effort from President Janet Napolitano

***News Release*** – Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom statement on the University of California’s threat to increase tuition fees

Contact: Andrea Koskey, Communications Director

California Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom issued the following statement on the University of California’s threat to increase tuition unless the state appropriates additional funds, thereby breaking its two-year old tuition-freeze agreement negotiated in 2013 in exchange for increased state funding:

The University of California cannot bestow pay raises on its top earners with one hand, while continually taking more from students and their families with the other and deflecting criticism by laying its solution at the door of taxpayers. New funding must be tied to earnest and innovative attempts to reduce the university’s cost structure and promote affordability and accessibility, not threats that reward the status quo.”

Background

The proposed increase to students comes just two months after the same board approved up to 20 percent increases to four chancellors and increased a base salary for a new chancellor by 23 percent of his predecessor. These decisions are not tied to performance or outcomes.

Lieutenant Governor Newsom believes that high-level solutions could be factored in to meet the growing costs.  For instance, UC facilities system-wide could save $500,000 per contract if in-house employment was used over outside contractors; another $160 million could be saved if UC offered an Associate Degree to Transfer Program from California Community Colleges, similar to existing program between community colleges and California State Universities; and millions could be saved if the failed IT implementation of UC Path was addressed. That program’s repayment costs have ballooned to $200 million over the next 20 years.

The University of California system has received numerous increases to financial resources including full funding of State’s Cal grant program; expansion of the middle-income fee grants covering one-half of tuition and fee increases for middle-income students from families earning up to $120,000; 20 percent increase in state funding as part of a multi-year stable funding plan; a 5 percent increase from the 2014-15 state budget contingent a tuition freeze through 2016-17; and $50 million to promote innovative models of higher education at the campus level that result in more bachelor’s degrees, improved four‑year completion rates, and more effective transfers between the community colleges and the universities.

Word on the Street: “IKEA PALO ALTO UNIVERSITY?”

Tuesday, September 16th, 2014

IKEA U, as seen near Stanford, CA:

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Go Reindeers!

How Mercy High School Makes a Few Extra Bucks: Hosting Lots of Cell Phone Tower Antennas on the Roof

Thursday, September 11th, 2014

See?

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MERCY HIGH SCHOOL (Students: 500; Location: 3250 19TH AVE; Grades: 9 – 12; Girls only)

El Camino Update: “AX CAL” – That’s Not Nice

Thursday, August 28th, 2014

Poor Cal!

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UC Hastings Dean Frank Wu Has Become the J. Peterman of SF – Here’s His Pre-Apology for Snubbing You at the Gym

Monday, August 11th, 2014

I’ll tell you, I never before have encountered an entity the likes of UC Hastings Dean Frank Wu.

So that’s the baseline, but now he’s just kicked things up a notch (BAM!) with:

Why I Might Not Say Hello to You at the Gym

And here’s one reaction from the peanut gallery:

The Tens @thetens · Just RTing this to remember the ridiculousness RT @uchastingslaw Why I Might Not Say Hello to You @ the Gym @FrankHWuhttp://ow.ly/3o8yn3 

Feel free to read Dean Wu’s bits from LinkedIn and the HuffPo, linked below.

Hey, what about this:

Wu’s a talker more than a listener and his in-your-face style is not always welcome.

Yeah, I hear you, Daily Recorder.

All right, enjoy. I can’t say I’ve read all these bits linked below, but, at the very least,  some of the titles are amusing.

Actually, I’m surprised he hasn’t already been profiled by our local MSM, you know, with photos of him riding to school through the TL on one of his motorcycles, that kind of thing. There’s a lot of material to work from, what with his relentless columns with writings on all topics ala Larry King or, indeed, Hastings alum and Mayor of San Francisco for the past two decades Willie Brown.

To repeat, I never before have encountered an entity the likes of UC Hastings Dean Frank Wu.

Take Charge — Nobody Else Is Going To

Dennis Herrera Throws Down: Reaches $4.4 Million Settlement with California Art Institute – Students Getting Cash

Tuesday, June 17th, 2014

The News of the Day, re: Argosy University:

“Herrera reaches $4.4 million agreement in dispute over for-profit college’s marketing. California Art Institutes’ ownership to settle for $1.95 million; fund returning student and new student scholarships; and re-calculate graduation and job placement rates

SAN FRANCISCO (June 17, 2014) – City Attorney Dennis Herrera today settled an unlitigated claim against California Art Institutes’ parent company in a consumer protection dispute over marketing tactics that allegedly underestimated program costs for students and inflated job placement figures for graduates.

Under terms of the agreement with Educational Management Corporation, the Pittsburgh-based for-profit educational provider will pay San Francisco $1.95 million to settle the dispute; endow a $1.6 million scholarship fund for non-graduating California Art Institute students who wish to return to finish their studies; and offer $850,000 in general scholarships to new students.  The agreement—formally an “Assurance of Voluntary Compliance” that is legally binding and enforceable in court—includes provisions for a sweeping array of reforms to Educational Management Corporation’s marketing and reporting practices.  The accord, which avoids litigation, includes no admissions of wrongdoing.

“I hope this agreement is a bellwether for other for-profit colleges, highlighting the need to fully inform students about their education costs and job placement prospects,” said Herrera.  “In a workplace where so much depends on education and training, students deserve accurate information about the schools they attend—and that’s exactly what California law requires.  I applaud Educational Management Corporation for its industry leadership in working with us cooperatively and productively.  They’ve shown a commendable willingness to address concerns about their current and former students, and to avoid similar problems moving forward.”

The $1.6 million Returning Student Scholarship Fund will be distributed to students who withdrew from California Art Institute programs between 2009 and today, and will be available to returning students for five years or until it is exhausted.  EDMC and the City Attorney’s Office will work together to publicize the fund to reach out to eligible former students.  EDMC has also agreed to new methods of calculating the percentage of enrolling students that graduate with degrees, and the percentages of students that are employed and that are employed within their field of study; and to publicize those recalculated figures in their promotional materials.  The school also agreed to train advisors to counsel students on the long term effects of student loan debt and default.

As is common with Assurances of Voluntary Compliance reached outside of litigation, the agreement also includes enforcement provisions that compel EDMC to notify the City Attorney of any breaches of the agreement on its part, and a stipulation that a material violation by EDMC will be considered evidence of an unfair business practice that the City could make the subject of a future lawsuit.”