Archive for the ‘film’ Category

5TH JAPAN FILM FESTIVAL Runs September 1-10, 2017 at NEW PEOPLE Cinema – Free Showing of Miyazaki Doc

Friday, August 4th, 2017

All the deets:

“5TH JAPAN FILM FESTIVAL OF SAN FRANCISCO

September 1-10, 2017 at NEW PEOPLE Cinema

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SAN FRANCISCO, August 1, 2017 – The 5th Annual JAPAN FILM FESTIVAL OF SAN FRANCISCO will be held at the NEW PEOPLE Cinema in September 1-10, 2017. Premiere screenings of the latest Japanese live-action and animation films, special appearances and Q&A sessions with filmmakers are planned. Also, the film festival will present the JFFSF Honorary Award 2017 to Actor and Director Kaori Momoi (Memoirs of a Geisha, Ghost In the Shell). The award ceremony will take place at the J-POP SUMMIT 2017 main stage at the Fort Mason Center For Arts & Culture on the second weekend, Saturday, September 9th at 2pm.

Tickets are $15. Festival Passport is $150 (This passport allows full priority access to all films at the Japan Film Festival of San Francisco, but does not include admission to J-POP SUMMIT 2017, taking place in Fort Mason Center on Saturday, September 9th and Sunday 10th, 2017 for two days. J-POP SUMMIT tickets available here) Quantity is limited.

For additional ticket information, please visit the www.jffsf.org or email info@jffsf.org. Please pick up your tickets at Will Call at the entrance of NEW PEOPLE during the festival week. Bring your confirmation e-ticket with barcode and a valid photo I.D.

The complete program for the festival can be found below.

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SF Board of Supervisors President London Breed Gets Second Billing in a Banksy Documentary?

Tuesday, July 25th, 2017

Here we go, from the LA Weekly:

Director: Colin M. Day
Cast: Banksy, London Breed, Michael Cuffe, Ben Eine
Writer: Éva Boros
Distributor: Parade Deck Films

And here’s a screen grab:

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Now one problem with these credits, is that BANKSY ISN’T IN THIS DOC AT ALL. I mean that’s the whole thing, we’re not supposed to know what he looks like.

And London doesn’t get a lot of screen time either. I’m thinking less than a minute.

Now there is an idea called PROTOCOL ORDER, which has to do with who gets top billing* at some meet-up and what to do if there’s a tie, so yeah, the film is about Banksy so he’s listed #1, and then London Breed is the highest ranking elected official, so this might kind of make sense to somebody. But not to me.

And it looks like London doesn’t even make the FULL CAST list on IMDB, but she does have her own inchoate IMDB entry so go figure.

In other news, the Haight Street Rat is back, in a way. I don’t know how involved the property owner was with that, and I also don’t know if SFGov views the new rat as art, graffiti, or something in betwixt.

*Ginger’s agent told her that Gilligan’s Island was going to be about a castaway movie star plus six nobodies, basically Snow White and the Six Dwarves. She got steamed after she realized it’d be pretty much an ensemble cast with Big G the main star.

Transformers 6 Now Filming in Peacock Gap, San Rafael – We’re Paying $22 Million for “Bumblebee” – Code Name: “Brighton Falls”

Monday, July 24th, 2017

So some people are calling this joint “Transformers 6,” but it’s more of an offshoot, a part of the Transformers Universe, hence the name Transformers Universe: Bumblebee.

Our North Bay MSM is on the case. See?

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Who knows where they will film next in the bay area. Could be Frisco, why not? (Well, why not if you don’t factor in our $14 an hour minimum wage, which the Hollywood set still can’t wrap its head around.)

Hey, speaking of money, we’re paying $22 million for this production? Ouch. But here’s the pitch:

“Canada provides large tax credits to production companies for shooting up there, which has resulted in an enormous loss of productions to Canada from California, taking with them all their salaries and taxes. By California providing credits it creates balance and ensure that productions, which inject huge sums of money into the local economy through equipment, hotel and home rentals, wages, sales taxes and more, stay in California. Productions also provide large numbers of jobs for PAs, ADs, DPs etc… Since the average cost of filming often exceeds $1 million a day, you can see how much having these productions shot in Marin, or California, feeds back into our economy. It’s one of the best investments we can make, as Hollywood is an enormous part of our state economy.”

I’m sorry, what a load of horse shit that was. Now here’s the reality, from the House Organ of Hollywood:

Film Tax Incentives Are a Giant Waste of Money, New Study Finds

Yep yep.

Now lately, Transformers movies have mostly been made for China. I’m srsly. (We can talk about this, if you want.) So why not have the People’s Republic of China pay for this movie instead of the tax and fee payers of California, one wonders.

And better yet, why not just film the whole deal over in China as well? Just asking.

However, this film will be Michael Bay-free, so who knows, it might end up being perfectly cromulent. It’s a live-action Iron Giant with a female lead, right?

Filming is supposed to wrap by November 15th, 2017. Hopefully, if you aspire to be an extra, you and your friends can hop on the gravy train and somehow make some cash from this production.

And what of the future? There are currently 13 other Transformers films in development. I’m srsly.

Play us out, Bobby Bolivia. Play us out, Bumblebee:

Al Gore Returns to Frisco July 24th – “An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power” at the Castro – 37th Annual Jewish Film Festival

Thursday, June 29th, 2017

“FORMER VICE PRESIDENT AL GORE TO ATTEND SCREENING OF “AN INCONVENIENT SEQUEL: TRUTH TO POWER” AT THE 37TH SAN FRANCISCO JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL

SAN FRANCISCO, June 29, 2017 – The Jewish Film Institute (JFI) is pleased to announce that former Vice President and environmental activist Al Gore will be in attendance for the San Francisco Jewish Film Festival’s (SFJFF) screening of Bonni Cohen and Jon Shenk’s AN INCONVENIENT SEQUEL: TRUTH TO POWER, the highly anticipated sequel to AN INCONVENIENT TRUTH.

The screening will take place Monday, July 24 at the Castro Theatre at 7:30 pm as the final film as part of the festivals’ fourth annual Take Action Day, a full day dedicated to community action. The film will also serve as the Local Spotlight film in celebration of Bay Area based filmmakers Bonni Cohen and Jon Shenk.

All the deets:

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Paradise Theatre Reopens, in the Presidio

Friday, June 9th, 2017

Before and After, STYX-style:

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And Before…

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…and After, eventually, Presidio-style:

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Read all about it via Adam Brinklow at CurbedSF.

Hey, did local movie theater-owning interests invest tens of thousands of dollars trying to make sure that this isolated building located deep within the Presidio would never reopen and therefore never compete with said local movie theater-owning interests? Yep, about a decade ago.

Oh well.

Anyway, here’s your FAQ and here are all the deets:

PRESS RELEASE The Presidio Theatre’s Next Act – Margaret E. Haas Fund to Rehabilitate the Presidio’s Historic Presidio Theatre as a Multipurpose Performance Space

San Francisco, CA (June 06, 2017) – The Margaret E. Haas Fund in partnership with the Presidio Trust today announced plans to rehabilitate the Presidio Theatre, located in the heart of the national park site on the Presidio’s Main Post. Vacant since 1995, the building will be rehabilitated into a high quality and affordable multipurpose space for live theatre, film, dance, music, lectures, educational programming and special events. The two-year rehabilitation will commence this summer, and is expected to be completed in mid-2019.

“I am grateful for the opportunity to create a modern and accessible performing space for artists in San Francisco and the Bay Area,” said Margaret “Peggy” Haas, Chair of the Board of Directors of the Margaret E. Haas Fund. “There is a dearth of high quality theatres for live performances – and many of the available spaces are not accessible to smaller performing arts organizations. The Presidio Theatre will offer a place for these groups to showcase their work to a wide range of audiences.”

Located near the historic Presidio Officers’ Club and the expansive green Main Parade Ground, the Presidio Theatre is among the last buildings on the Main Post to be rehabilitated. Originally built in 1939 as a movie theatre for the officers and enlisted men at the post, during World War Two, in 1942, both Jack Benny and Bob Hope brought full casts to perform and record their hugely popular radio shows in the theatre. The theatre was renovated by the Army in 1962, and the last movie was shown in 1994.

The rehabilitation will breathe new life into the historic building while adding great benefit for the Bay Area arts community. When completed, the state-of-the-art theatre will reflect its original 1939 Spanish Colonial Revival design, with approximately 650 seats, a functionally expanded stage, new accessible seating, and code-compliant restrooms. A new pavilion will be created in the open area to the west of the existing theatre that opens onto a new courtyard. The project architect is Hornberger + Worstell and the historic preservation consultant is Knapp Architects, both of San Francisco.

“We are pleased to move forward with this new partnership to bring back a beloved space,” said Francene Gonek, Chief of Business Operations for the Presidio Trust. “This mutually beneficial relationship serves the mandate of the Presidio Trust to be financially self-sufficient while, at the same time, creating new opportunities for public use and enjoyment.”

The Presidio Theatre will be operated and managed by a new non-profit organization set up expressly to support the theatre. It will be host to a mix of theatre, film, dance and music performances as well as lectures, educational programming and special events. Theatre operations will be funded through a mixture of facility rental fees, ticket sales and fundraising.

About the Presidio Trust

The Presidio Trust is an innovative federal agency created to save the Presidio and employ a partnership approach to transform it into a new kind of national park. Spanning 1,500 acres in a spectacular setting at the Golden Gate, the Presidio now operates without federal appropriations, is home to a community of residents and commercial tenants, and offers unique recreation, hospitality, and educational opportunities to people throughout the San Francisco Bay Area and the world. To learn more please visit www.presidio.gov.

Huge: SFMOMA, SFFS ANNOUNCE “WERNER HERZOG AND ECSTATIC TRUTH” Starts Feb 9 at SFMOMA’s Phyllis Wattis Theatre

Tuesday, January 10th, 2017

As much Werner Hertzog as you can possibly handle:

“SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF MODERN ART AND SAN FRANCISCO FILM SOCIETY ANNOUNCE WERNER HERZOG AND ECSTATIC TRUTH STARTING FEBRUARY 9 AT SFMOMA’S PHYLLIS WATTIS THEATER

Second Season of Modern Cinema Runs for Three Weekends in February and Explores the Nonfiction Work of Herzog and Several of His Contemporaries

SAN FRANCISCO, CA—The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) and the San Francisco Film Society (SFFS) announce the second season of Modern Cinema, the collaborative film series that explores the dynamic relationships between the past and present of cinema as one of the modern era’s essential art forms. Season two, entitled Werner Herzog and Ecstatic Truth, starts February 9, 2017, and is dedicated to the nonfiction work of legendary filmmaker Werner Herzog. It also includes important documentaries from other filmmakers that consider the world from a poetic, dream-infused and existential perspective. All screenings and talks take place in the newly renovated Phyllis Wattis Theater at SFMOMA, and several programs will feature special introductions by notable Bay Area figures, to be announced at a later date.

“For nearly 50 years, Werner Herzog has brought us amazing stories and images from the far ends of the earth and the limits of human experience,” said Dominic Willsdon, Leanne and George Roberts Curator of Education and Public Practice at SFMOMA, “It’s exciting to able to celebrate his work in this way, alongside other great hunters of rare and vivid truths.”

“Werner Herzog is a unique master of cinema, combining fiction and nonfiction filmmaking to make a bracingly fresh art form entirely his own,” said SFFS Executive Director Noah Cowan. “We have taken inspiration from him for our own unique collaboration with SFMOMA to bring a new perspective to the history and culture of cinema as a treasured art form, embedded within the larger story of art-making. It’s a perfect follow-up to the smash success of Modern Cinema’s first season, paying tribute to the Janus Films / Criterion library alongside the contemporary work of Apichatpong Weerasethakul.”

Modern Cinema seeks to highlight the ongoing dialogue between the critically acclaimed filmmakers of today—particularly those showcased in contemporary visual culture—and the great masters of cinema’s past, in an attempt to shine a light on the historical continuity and ongoing impact of this modern art form. The second season explores the boundaries of nonfiction filmmaking—between “fact” and “truth”—in the work of Herzog and in other canonical works in which the filmmaker’s powerful point of view similarly bends the rules of traditional documentary storytelling.

In his 2010 essay “On the Absolute, the Sublime, and Ecstatic Truth,” Herzog put forth his feelings about veracity in life and documentary filmmaking, stating that he “can only very vaguely begin to fathom the Absolute; I am in no position to define the concept.” Distinguishing between the factual and what he calls “ecstatic flash” of truth, he writes, “What moves me has never been reality, but a question that lies behind it: the question of truth.”

Taking Herzog’s idea of the Ecstatic Truth as its organizing principle, the second season of Modern Cinema combines a vast range of this master filmmaker’s documentaries with complementary works that operate along similar lines. A number of the films presented are seminal works from early in Herzog’s career. Whether it’s the unforgettable landscapes and nightmarish visions of Fata Morgana and Lessons of Darkness; the probing looks at preaching and spirituality in Huie’s Sermon, Wheel of Time and Pilgrimage; or some of his more recent investigations into the natural world, Herzog’s films almost always seek to surprise and provoke in how they approach their topics.

The films by other directors presented alongside Herzog’s work share some of his interests while reflecting their creators’ own particular styles. From idiosyncratic portraits of unique individuals (Shirley Clarke’s Portrait of Jason and Herzog’s Little Dieter Needs to Fly) to unforgettable depictions about spirituality (Philip Gröning’s Into Great Silence and Herzog’s Bells from the Deep) to behind-the-scenes stories of filmmaking itself (Les Blank’s Burden of Dreams and Herzog’s My Best Fiend), the subjects presented in Werner Herzog and Ecstatic Truth offer visionary realizations of nonfiction work.

WEEK ONE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9
6 p.m.—Burden of Dreams (Les Blank, USA, 1982, 95 min.)
8:30 p.m.—Grizzly Man (Werner Herzog, USA, 2005, 104 min.)

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10
6 p.m.—The Great Ecstasy of the Woodcutter Steiner with How Much Wood Could a Woodchuck Chuck (Werner Herzog, Germany, 1972/1976, TRT 92 min.)
8:30 p.m.—The Gleaners and I (Agnès Varda, France, 2000, 82 min.)

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 11
3 p.m.—Jag Mandir: The Eccentric Private Theatre of the Maharaja of Udaipur (Werner Herzog, Austria/Germany, 1991, 85 min.)
5 p.m.—Bells from the Deep with Pilgrimage (Werner Herzog, Germany/UK, 1993/2001, TRT 78 min.)
8:30 p.m.—My Winnipeg (Guy Maddin, Canada, 2007, 80 min.)

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 12
3:30 p.m.—Into Great Silence (Philip Gröning, Germany, 2006, 162 min.)
7:30 p.m.—Lessons of Darkness with La Soufrière (Werner Herzog, France/Germany, 1992/1977, TRT 83 min.)

WEEK TWO

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16
6 p.m.—Land of Silence and Darkness (Werner Herzog, Germany, 1971, 85 min.)
8:15 p.m.—Poto and Cobengo (Jean-Pierre Gorin, USA/Germany, 1980, 73 min.)

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17
6 p.m.—Fata Morgana (Werner Herzog, Germany, 1971. 79 min.)
8 p.m.—Gates of Heaven (Errol Morris, USA, 1978, 83 min.)

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18
3 p.m.—Goshogaoka (Sharon Lockhart, USA/Japan, 1997, 63 min.)
5 p.m.—Into the Abyss: A Tale of Death, A Tale of Life (Werner Herzog, USA, 2011, 107 min.)
8 p.m.—Encounters at the End of the World (Werner Herzog, USA, 2007, 99 min.)

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19
3 p.m.—God’s Angry Man with Huie’s Sermon (Werner Herzog, Germany, 1980, TRT 87 min.)
5:15 p.m.—Close-Up (Abbas Kiarostami, Iran, 1990, 97 min.)
8 p.m.—The Emperor’s Naked Army Marches On (Kazuo Hara, Japan, 1987, 122 min.)

WEEK THREE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23
6 p.m.—Wodaabe: Herdsmen of the Sun (Werner Herzog, France, 1989, 52 min.)
7:30 p.m.—The Lion Hunters with The Mad Masters (Jean Rouch, France, 1965/1955, TRT 105 min.)

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24
6 p.m.—Cave of Forgotten Dreams (Werner Herzog, Canada, 2011, 90 min.)
8:30 p.m.—Happy People: A Year in the Taiga (Werner Herzog and Dmitry Vasyukov, Germany, 2010, 90 min.)

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25
3 p.m.—Portrait of Jason (Shirley Clarke, USA, 1967, 105 min.)
5:30 p.m.—A Man Vanishes (Shôhei Imamura, Japan, 1967 130 min.)
8:30 p.m.—My Best Fiend (Werner Herzog, Germany, 1999, 95 min.)

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26
5:30 p.m.—Wheel of Time (Werner Herzog, Germany, 2003, 80 min.)
7:30 p.m.—Little Dieter Needs to Fly (Werner Herzog, Germany, 1997, 80 min.)

Tickets and Information
General public tickets are $12 and will be available online as of 10 a.m., January 17, 2017, or onsite at SFMOMA during regular business hours. Modern Cinema tickets do not include admission to SFMOMA galleries. Ticket-holders for Modern Cinema should enter through the museum’s Joyce and Larry Stupski Entrance on Minna Street (between Third and New Montgomery Streets). For up-to-date program information and tickets, visit sfmoma.org/modern-cinema.

About the Phyllis Wattis Theater at SFMOMA
As part of the opening of the new and expanded SFMOMA in May 2016, the Phyllis Wattis Theater also received a major renovation and system update creating one of the most enjoyable places to see film in the Bay Area. A new, state-of-the-art NEC digital projector offers Modern Cinema the ability to present films on a 24 x 12-foot screen with the capacity to show aspect ratios of 1:37, 1:66, 1:85 and 2:39. The Wattis Theater can also screen films via new Kinoton projectors in 16 and 35mm formats. Because sound is integral to the cinematic experience, a new Meyer Sound Cinema Surround System enhances the nuance and precision intended by the filmmaker. Comfortable new seating with cup holders round out the Wattis Theater experience.

Supporters
Modern Cinema’s Founding Supporters are Carla Emil and Rich Silverstein. Generous support is provided by Nion T. McEvoy and the Susan Wildberg Morgenstein Fund.

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
SFMOMA is dedicated to making the art for our time a vital and meaningful part of public life. Founded in 1935 as the first West Coast museum devoted to modern and contemporary art, a thoroughly transformed SFMOMA, with triple the gallery space, an enhanced education center and new public galleries, opened to the public on May 14, 2016.
www.sfmoma.org

San Francisco Film Society

The San Francisco Film Society champions the world’s finest films and filmmakers through programs anchored in and inspired by the spirit and values of the San Francisco Bay Area. Building on a legacy of nearly 60 years of bringing the best in world cinema to the local audiences, SFFS is now a national leader in film exhibition, media education and filmmaker services.

The Film Society presents more than 100 days of exhibition each year, reaching a total audience of more than 100,000 people. Its acclaimed education program introduces international, independent and documentary cinema and media literacy to more than 10,000 teachers and students. Through Filmmaker360, the Film Society’s filmmaker services program, essential creative and business services, and funding totaling millions of dollars are provided to deserving filmmakers at all stages of their careers.

The Film Society seeks to elevate all aspects of film culture, offering a wide range of activities that engage emotions, inspire action, change perceptions and advance knowledge. A 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation, it is largely donor and member supported. Membership provides access to discounts, private events and a wealth of other benefits

For more information: sffs.org

This press release is available online at sffs.org/press/releases.

Word on the Street: This Star Wars Rey Figure “Looks Like a Man”

Monday, January 2nd, 2017

According to one passerby, in SoMA:

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His GF also had a thumbs down. So no sale for these two fans…

Hollywood is Back, Now Filming in Golden Gate Park – But Double Parked Mercedes-Benzes Block Area Cyclists – A Yuuuge Production

Thursday, November 10th, 2016

[UPDATE: Oh, it was for Herbalife?]

I’ll tell you, Hollywood just doesn’t get our local parking rules:

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Anyway, this is a large production, with many people and vehicles on site today near our Rose Garden

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Of course, RPD has Rangers on site, but they’re sitting around far away near Stow Lake. And really, the requirement to have them is more of a jobs program than anything else. (So as long as Hollywood pays RPD’s high fees I don’t think a Park Ranger cares what they do – nobody’s likely to try to enforce rules on our paying guests.)

So the “creatives” from Los Angeles County feel put upon because they have to pay big bucks to work in a very expensive place* and then our locals resent the Angelenoses’ general cluelessness.

And it’s like, “We’d be better off in Vancouver,” and I’m like yes! Maybe you all would be…

*NBC’s Trauma was like this. Filming on location was an attempt to make it special but that meant that it couldn’t survive with anything less than yuge ratings

Permit Shmermit! – How to Film a Scene in Chinatown, 30 Seconds at a Time, In Between Red Traffic Signals

Wednesday, August 3rd, 2016

(I think this is how Coppola Daughter made Lost In Translation in Japan, one step ahead of the cops sometimes.)

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You can’t get more verite than this…

Famous Gretchen Mol Graces the Twitterloin – Frisco’s “Seedy Underbelly” Stars in New Hulu Drama “Chance” – Filming on Leavenworth

Tuesday, August 2nd, 2016

Here’s the scene at 60 Leavenworth:

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Gretchen Mol – it totally looks like her, right? She’s pertty:

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Signage:

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Get all the deets from @gerikoeppel on the Hoodline