Archive for the ‘hotels’ Category

Official CA Bed & Breakfast Myth Debunking Makes Me Want to Never Ever Visit a B&B

Monday, April 12th, 2010

Now I know what the California Association of Bed & Breakfast Inns (CABBI) is trying to do here today, but, man, I don’t know, some of the myths listed below are news to me. So the net effect  is that I’m less likely to ever set foot in a B&B.

Think I’d rather sleep in my aging Land Cruiser (diagonally, as it’s shorter than some Camry Solara  two-doors) after flopping the rear seats and popping the minivan-style rear side windows than deal with any of the B&Bs that got these myths going.

(Also, I’d like to note that not having a shared bathroom, in and of itself, does not “ensure” your safety.)

OTOH, put a kayak-in B&B on Red Rock Island, San Francisco’s northernmost piece of real estate, and I’d be up for an overnight. Red Rock is on the left and Danielle Steel’s least favoritest Bed and Breakfast is on the right behind the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge, on noisy East Brother Island in neighboring CoCo County.

(San Francisco County extends to places it really shouldn’t, don’t you know.)

Anyway, have at it.

Debunking the Top Five Myths of Bed & Breakfasts: California’s B&B Association Sets the Record Straight

SACRAMENTO, Calif., April 12 — The California Association of Bed & Breakfast Inns (CABBI) recently asked travelers if they’ve ever stayed at a bed and breakfast, and if not, why? The answers made us smile. Below is a list of the top five misconceptions we heard.  For more debunked myths about B&Bs, visit: http://www.cabbi.com/res/docs/BB_Myths_PressRelease_April2010.pdf

1) B&B decor is limited to lace doilies, paisley wallpaper, antiques, and patchwork quilts

The decor of some CABBI-member inns recall earlier eras, but increasingly more inns, such as San Francisco’s Laurel Inn in or San Diego’s Hotel Parisi are trending toward clean, sophisticated decor with modern furnishings and amenities. Even many Victorians, like the Honor Mansion in Healdsburg, feature individually decorated rooms to appeal to a variety of tastes.

2) You have to share a bathroom with other guests

The majority of CABBI-member inns offer private bathrooms. For those that don’t, most–like the Hotel Charlotte near Yosemite National Park–have policies of only renting rooms with shared bathrooms to families and couples traveling together to ensure the safety and comfort of guests.

3) You have to eat breakfast with total strangers and eat whatever the innkeeper prepares that morning

The Elk Cove Inn & Spa in Elk offers guests many choices for breakfast.  Guests can choose to sit at the large table if they wish to socialize, or dine at a more intimate, two-person table. The inn’s champagne brunch features 20-30 items, allowing guests to select what they want to eat.  Many inns also pride themselves on accommodating guests with special diets or food allergies.

4) You have to abide by a curfew set by the innkeeper

Curfews are one of the most common myths. At the McCaffrey House Bed & Breakfast in Twain Harte, guests have keys to the main house and guest room doors, providing guests with the flexibility to come and go as they please.

5) B&Bs are only for couples and strictly prohibit children and pets

CABBI has over 180 family-friendly inns and more than 70 pet-friendly inns in California. The Dolphin Inn in Carmel offers a family unit with two bedrooms, two bathrooms, a heated swimming pool, and breakfast delivered to your door. The Beazley House Bed & Breakfast Inn in Napa offers 11 pet-friendly rooms. Four-legged guests receive a water bowl, a treat bag, and a list of dog-friendly wineries and restaurants. To search for more family-friendly or pet-friendly inns, visit http://www.cabbi.com/search/advanced/.

Established in 1991, The California Association of Bed & Breakfast Inns (CABBI) is the largest tourism organization of its kind in California. We are a non-profit, statewide organization that is wholly dedicated to ensuring the highest quality standards in bed and breakfast accommodations. Currently, CABBI has nearly 300 members. Source: The California Association of Bed & Breakfast Inns

Something New: “Oyster Hotel Reviews” Shows What Your Next Hotel Will Look Like

Wednesday, November 18th, 2009

Oyster Hotel Reviews recently sent some of its “reporters” to the 415, and man oh man, they took pictures of everything inside of 47 of our nicer joints. So if you’re obsessed with what your potential hotel room will look like, then you’re going to want to see this.

Click to soak up the new San Francisco section.

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See all the pics of individual hotel rooms? Oh man, that’s a lot of photos – and they’re all the same basic style, very straightforward with lots of fish-eye lens shots. (Images would look very different if you unleashed the kids from CaliberSF and let them roam San Francisco’s finest hotel rooms, of course.) 

But if you want to see how things look, like if you want to see multiple angles of the big flat screen TV in the Astor Suite at the Reeg, well have at it.

Presenting ”Bathroom at The Astor Suite of The St. Regis San Francisco, 2009.” Just a tiny TV in the bathroom, of course:

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Another thing: Oyster has listed our pros and cons for tout le monde to see. Here’s a selection:

Pros:

Sea lions at Pier 39
Liberalism and political activism
Epicenter of gay rights movements
Thriving gay scene, especially in Castro District

Cons: 

Microclimates within the city means it can be sunny in one neighborhood and gray in the next
Taxis can be frustratingly few and far between.
Vagrancy and panhandling are common. 
Locals consider some areas, like Fisherman’s Wharf and the Castro, intolerable tourist traps.
Street parking can be a blood sport; hotel parking is expensive.
(Very) slight chance of earthquakes

Boy, they’ve got us pegged, huh?

Anyway, they’ve also done New York, Los Angeles, Hawaii, Las Vegas, Miami, the Caribbean – the list goes on. Check it out, after the jump. 

Ahora, el mundo es su ostra!

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