Archive for the ‘science’ Category

Nancy Pelosi Announces First Annual Bay Area Science Festival, Oct. 29 to Nov. 12 – It’s Going to be Huge!

Tuesday, August 16th, 2011

Holy Toledo, this thing is going to be huge.

Check it:

“Featuring more than 100 free events, the inaugural Bay Area Science Festival will bring together an unprecedented brain trust of the region’s scientific and educational partners to produce what is expected to be one of the largest science-based events ever held in the United States.

The San Francisco Bay Area is known for its groundbreaking work in science and technology, yet many who call the Bay Area home have little opportunity to experience the wonder of science. Led by the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), the Bay Area Science Festival is designed to inspire and build interest in science, technology and engineering among people of all ages and backgrounds.

The public will be invited to this series of events stretching from Santa Rosa to San Jose, including opportunities to experience science in action and hear about the latest scientific discoveries and culminating in a blow-out finale at AT&T Park.”

Science! 

Students at Wallenberg High School participated in a hands-on lesson taught through the UCSF Science Education & Health Partnership program, which was founded in 1987 and is now organizing the Bay Area Science Festival.

 

Muchas gracias, UCSF!

Ever more deets, after the jump

(more…)

Come to This Thursday’s “Workout NightLife” Party at Our CalAcademy and See If You Can Find Jared, the Subway Guy

Monday, July 25th, 2011

Our California Academy of Sciences is bringing it this Thursday night, July 28th, 2011 from 6:00 to 10:00 PM – it’s WORKOUT NIGHTLIFE just in time for the 2011 San Francisco Marathon on July 31st!

Bring your camera for when you spot Jared Fogle:

All the deets:

Workout NightLife

This week, NightLife works up a sweat in preparation for The San Francisco Marathon. CHEER SF will pump up the crowd with two performances in the East garden, followed by a costume contest for the best in workout attire (see below for categories). The SF Marathon crew and race partners will host interactive components including a chair massage station by Everest College, a yoga station from Lululemon, strategies from Bootcamp SF, UCSF RunSafe gait analysis and injury prevention advice, and contestants Ada Wong and Jesse Atkins from The Biggest Loser Season 10 leading a circuit workout. Plus, a series of creative short clips made just for planetarium domes at 6:30. Music by DJ Kap10.

Win a chance to run the 5k with “The Subway Guy,” Jared Fogle presented by The San Francisco Marathon! The “Where’s Jared” hunt will take place from 6pm to 9pm at NightLife. Dressed for the occasion, Jared will be in his finest workout attire. Be the first person to post 5 photos of Jared in 5 different locations at Nightlife to The The SF Marathon Facebook page and you will win an entry to the 5k event at The San Francisco Marathon on Sunday, July 31st!

Schedule of Events

6-9pm Snakes & Lizards- new exhibit! (Last entry at 8:45pm)/ Forum

6-10pm DJ Kap 10/ East Pavilion

6:30pm Best of DomeFest/ Planetarium

6:30-9:30pm SF Marathon Partners & Active Workshops / African Hall

7:30 & 8pm Performance by CHEER SF/ East Garden

7:30 & 8:30pm Life: A Cosmic Story/ Planetarium

8:30pm Workout Wear Costume Contest/ Piazza

Buy Tickets to NightLife on July 28th

OMG, OMG, the First Annual Bay Area Science Festival Runs Oct 29th to Nov 6th, 2011! Includes “Nerd Speed Dating”

Thursday, July 14th, 2011

Holy Toledo, this thing is going to be huge.

I’m talking huge.

Science! 

Students at Wallenberg High School participated in a hands-on lesson taught through the UCSF Science Education & Health Partnership program, which was founded in 1987 and is now organizing the Bay Area Science Festival.

 

Muchas gracias, UCSF!

“From October 29th to November 6th, the Bay Area will come alive with science & technology activities – lectures, debates, exhibitions, concerts, plays, workshops, and more. This ambitious collaborative public education initiative brings together our leading academic, scientific, corporate, and non-profit institutions to showcase the region as an international leader in innovation. Science happens all around us and directly impacts our daily lives – are you ready to unleash your inner scientist?

Discovery Days

It’s always festival time in the Bay Area! This program brings the fun and excitement of science to a huge crowd. In conjunction with local science outreach groups, the Discovery Days will have hundreds of hands-on activities, numerous performances, interactive demonstrations, and family-oriented science entertainment. But instead of one, we’re holding 3 different carnivals throughout the Bay Area to bring science to you!

  • East Bay Discovery Day at Cal State East Bay – Hayward: 10/29/11
  • North Bay Discovery Day at Infineon Raceway – Sonoma: 11/05/11
  • Festival Finale at AT&T Park – San Francisco: 11/06/11

Science at the Library

From Santa Rosa to San Jose, and everywhere in between, the Bay Area is a region of neighborhoods. For those who like to stay local, don’t miss the festival events taking place right in your community. Scientists, engineers, and other experts are set to appear in local libraries and community centers, providing over 50 fun programs for all to enjoy – most of them free.

Bay Area Star Party

Explore the cosmos! You are invited to take a “guided tour” of the stars hidden in our city night sky. Observatories around the Bay Area will open their doors to the public and feature talks by faculty and guest astronomers. In Oakland, Chabot Space and Science Center will host the grandest star party with its talks being broadcast over the radio for all to hear. Can’t make it to an observatory? Stargazing sites will be set up at community centers and parks in neighborhoods across the Bay Area. Don’t have a telescope? No problem! A bevy of local astronomers will bring both their equipment and their vast knowledge of the night sky to each location.

Wonder Dialogues

Ever wonder…how close we are to curing cancer? How will augmented reality impact the way we use media? How is our genetic code being used to improve medicine? What role do we play in preventing extinction? What makes an addict? These are just some of the many questions that will be explored during the Bay Area Science Festival’s Wonder Dialogue Series. Don’t miss this opportunity to talk with some of the world’s top scientists & engineers.
Topics under Development:

  • The Big C: the Future of Cancer Research
  • Can We Make it to Mars?
  • The End of the Universe and the Search for Meaning

One City, One Science Book
So many great science books, but so little time. Join the San Francisco and San Mateo County Libraries as we celebrate the best of science in book form. These annual citywide literary events encourage members of the community to read the same book at the same time and then discuss it in book groups and at numerous locations. Stay tuned for the announcement of the book!

Science Hikes

Take a walk on the science side! A number of scientists-guided hikes across the Bay Area will be available at your feet – just get out there and enjoy.
Hikes in Development:

  • Seismology along the San Andreas Fault
  • Water Conservation and the Pulgas Water Temple Hike
  • Tidal Restoration of the South Bay Salt Ponds
  • Paddle Elkorn Slough with a Naturalist

Science Pub Crawl
Some of the greatest scientific discoveries and discussions originated in local bars and cafes. The Bay Area Science Festival takes the conversation into our bars and cafes with an epic evening of scientific merriment. Enjoy the lighter side of science, from nerd speed dating to cocktail science.

OMG, It’s TEDxNASA@SiliconValley 2011! If You Like NASA, Register for This Free TEDx Event – August 17 in SF, CA

Friday, July 1st, 2011

I’ll tell you, I don’t know exactly what this event will be like, but it’s free and tickets will be all gone in two shakes of a lamb’s tail.

So, register now:

“In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TED has created a program called TEDx.

TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. Our event is call TEDxNASA, where x=independently organized TED event. At our TEDxNASA event, TEDTalks video and live speakers will combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group.

The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.

TEDxNASA@SiliconValley 2011

Wednesday, August 17, 2011
2:30 PM – 8:00 PM (PDT)

Marriott Marquis
55 Fourth Street
San Francisco, CA 94103



NASA Invites Public to TEDxNASA@SiliconValley 2011

WASHINGTON, July 1, 2011  – NASA is inviting reporters and the public to join agency leaders, technologists and innovators from a variety of fields at TEDxNASA@SiliconValley 2011 on Aug. 17. The event will be held at the Marriott Marquis hotel in San Francisco from 2:30 to 8:30 p.m. PDT.

The event is in the spirit of the TED (Technology, Entertainment and Design) conferences that bring together leading thinkers to create a dialogue about important global challenges. Speakers include an aeronautics researcher developing a silent, carbonless airplane; a tree geneticist cloning the world’s largest trees; a fish-loving researcher creating the next biofuel from a salt-loving succulent; a computer that beats Jeopardy! Champions; and a Tony-winning street theater company. Each presentation on the theme “Extreme Green” will last 18 minutes or less.

“NASA is synonymous with taking big dreams and making them happen,” said Pete Worden, director of NASA’s Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, Calif. “TEDxNASA allows us to further explore the power of ideas and the potential to change life here on Earth.”

The event is free and open to the public, but pre-registration is required. Registration opens Friday, July 1, and seating is limited. Reporters interested in attending should contact Jessica Culler at jessica.culler@nasa.gov by Aug. 12. If unable to attend in person, the conference will be streamed live on the TEDxNASA website.

For the stream and to register, visit.

http://tedxnasa.com

Esther Dyson, chair of the NASA Advisory Council’s Technology and Innovation Committee, will serve as the master of ceremonies for the event. “I’m excited to be part of this fertile combination of NASA and TEDx format,” Dyson said. “Both are dedicated to far-out, long-term thinking, and both understand the promise of hybrid vigor.”

NASA’s four research centers, Ames; Dryden Flight Research Center in Edwards, Calif.; Glenn Research Center in Cleveland; Langley Research Center and the National Institute of Aerospace, both in Hampton Va., are co-hosts of the event.

TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share an experience. These events are branded TEDx, where “x” means an independently organized TED event. TED is a non-profit organization founded in 1984. TED presentations are available for free at:

http://www.TED.com

For more information about NASA and agency programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov

SOURCE NASA

Science vs. Scientology: Northern California CoS HQ Gets Totally Pwned by California Academy of Sciences Banner

Thursday, June 23rd, 2011

See the banner for the California Academy of Sciences on the left there? It’s right by the main entrance to the Church of Scientology’s NorCal headquarters, the scene of many protests by “Anonymous.”

See?

Click to expand

What are the odds that the placement of that ad is just a coincidence?

(Oh well.)

The next time you’re in the area (right across the street from the TransAmerica Pyramid, BTW) stop by for a quick personality test, why not?

Here’s a sneak peak from Yelper Angela S on the Yelp.

Enjoy:

“As soon as we walked in we were asked to sign in – name (fake), address (San Francisco, CA), phone number (mix of my cell and land line – yes, those do still exist).  The man told us we could walk through at our own pace and then he’d give us a two minute spiel at the end.  We walked through reading some of the plaques that were ALL about L. Ron Hubbard, the founder.  L. Ron Hubbard’s books were sprinkled  everywhere.  When we got to the back there was a small area with maybe 60 chairs – it creeped me out.  I’m not sure why but it reminded me of a funeral home. I felt very out of place and felt that at any moment they could lock us in. After speeding by a few more plaques and pictures of you guessed it – L. Ron Hubbard we came across this ancient looking device.  The man from the front came over and said it was a “stress tester” and I immediately volunteered (at this point my date is wondering how fast he can drop me off). I held these silver canisters in my hands and watched this needle.

Scientologist: How’s work is going?
A: Fine.
Scientologist: What is your boss’ name?
A: Erica
[Needle was pretty steady.]
Scientologist: What’s your Mom’s name?
A: Pat
[Needle moves up a bit.]
Scientologist: What’s your Dad’s name?
A: Bob.
[Needle jumps.]
Scientologist: Ah…there is some tension with your Dad!
A: No, in fact, I am closer to him than my Mom. (I do understand why that’s a safe bet – most of my friends have issues with their Dad.)
[Scientologist ignores this comment and moves on.]
Scientologist: Are you married or dating?
A: This guy right here.  (I should write a book on what not to do when you just start dating someone.)
[Needle moves up a bit.]
Scientologist: Well what would you say is causing you the most stress in your life right now? (Reminded me of when Kramer pretended to be the movie phone guy, “Well why don’t you just tell me the name of the movie you want to see?”)
A: Um…well things are pretty good.  I guess my friend, Ashley, who is really depressed.
[Needle jerks and hits the max]
Scientologist: Ohhhh, don’t tell me she is taking medication. [Shakes head disapprovingly.]
A: Um is that bad? [Flash back to Tom Cruise screaming at Matt Lauer about how terrible anti-depressants are.] (I glance at my date who has a look of sheer terror on his face.)
Scientologist: Anti-depressants only mask the problem.  It doesn’t solve anything.  Come over here.
[We reluctantly walk over to the L. Ron Hubbard library where he pulls out two books.]
Scientologist: I recommend that you give this book to Ashley and this one you should read.
A: Ok well thanks for your time and allowing us to look around.  I’ll think about those books.
Scientologist: Sure come back anytime.
[Date shook hands with Scientologist and asked his name again.  Date used his real name.  D'OH!]“

UCSF’s CIRM Worm Building Officially Opens Today – Read All About it from Critic John King

Wednesday, February 9th, 2011

You know what I think? I think that it’s easier to teach a newspaper writer how to take photos than it is to teach a newspaper photographer how to write. So if you had to choose and you could only afford to send one person, you’d give a camera and send the writer, right?

That’s something to think about when you look at John King’s bits at SFGate. He does a fine job with photography on his own. Maybe even better?

Just saying.

Here’s a retread from last year. I think the new Mayor will be on the scene today to kick things off.

What’s the Next Big Thing in stem cell research? It’s got to be UCSF‘s shiny, brand-spanking-new, 700-foot-long Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research (CIRMbuilding from New Yawk-based Rafael Vinoly Architects.

Check it:

“The $123 million building is a series of split-level floors with terraced grass roofs and solar orientation. Open labs flow into each other, with office/interaction areas located on the circulation route between the labs, allowing for the entire research community in the building to interact.”

It’s the CIRM Worm! See?

Click to expand

It was the Modern Steel Construction Magazine cover girl earlier this year, or something, so that’s something to crow about.

As planned:

But this low-rise monster, in real life, somehow looks like:

An RV;

A boat;

A millipede; and

A Jawa Sandcrawler

And all at the same time.

Researchers have already moved in so let’s take a look why not.

Here’s the view coming up Medical Center Drive. This thing looks as if it will spring to life at any moment and start marching towards Parnassus, or Irving, to swallow a an N Judah or two:

This is how you build in Earthquake Country:

This is all the way up the hill where Med Center takes a hairpin. Kind of looks like an RV. Anterior Region in Lateral View:

Looking down the hill:

The clitellum:

And here, it sort of looks like a boat. See how it’s moored to Mount Sutro? (And hey, UCSF. Did you leave all the lights on for the entire four-day Thanksgiving weekend? O.K. fine.)

And here’s the gap betwixt floors:

Look through and you can see the ocean! (Or the bay, or the Golden Gate, or the estuary, whatever…)

Here’s the view from the roof, more or less, with a nice view of The Richmond and our Golden Gate Bridge

And here’s what we were promised, up on the roof:

And here’s what we got, it’s like weeds and International Orange chairs:

Maybe they’re still working on the vegetation.

And speaking of orange chairs, the theme continues inside:

Now, don’t fret about them concomitant radioactive materials up near the top…

…cause they have a nice outdoor shower to wash ‘em all away, Silkwood-style:

Leave us now depart the CIRM Worm:

Bon Courage, CIRM people!

They had a big party for the groundbreaking with Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger a couple years back, so maybe they’ll have another shindig for the official kickoff?

Read all about it or take a look at the video from back in the day.

2008 saw Arnold’s first visit ever to UCSF, so Chancellor J. Michael Bishop gave him the business about it.

The stars of the show were Arnie and Mr. Eli Broad

Was that a gold fleur-de-lys ring? Something like that.

Anyway, y’all come back.

All the deets:

The building, which will be located on the Parnassus Campus, will house 25 principal investigators and their teams at full capacity. It will be the headquarters of the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCSF, which will continue to include scientists across all UCSF campuses. The relocation of scientists into the building will free up space in existing laboratories/offices that will allow for additional recruitments. UCSF has recruited 16 new faculty members to the Center in the last three years. The building will be located near UCSF Medical Center, which will support the long-term goal of translating basic research findings to clinical trials.

Groundbreaking for the building, which has more than 46,000 assignable square feet and has four split-level floors, occurred in late August 2008, with completion of the project in late-2010.”

Design-Build Team:
General Contractor
DPR Construction, Inc., San Francisco
Fabricator and Erector
Schuff Steel – Pacific Division, Oakland/San Diego, Calif. (AISC Member)
Architect
SmithGroup, San Francisco
Structural Engineer
Forell/Elsesser Engineers, Inc., San Francisco
Preliminary Design Team:
Architect
Rafael Viñoly Architects, New York
Structural Engineer
Nabih Youssef Associates, San Francisco

Have We Hit “Peak Travel” Yet? Nope, Next Question

Wednesday, January 5th, 2011

So, people are going to move around less in the future?

Seems doubtful.

(Hey, remember Peak Oil? That trend peaked in 2005, well before the actual Peak Oil.)

Wow, NASA’s Photo of Cloud Vortices from Isla Socorro, The Academy of Sciences’ Tiny Island Off of Mexico

Monday, January 3rd, 2011

Here’s a shot from outer space showing how a tiny volcanic island can affect cloud formations a hundred miles away…

.

Click to expand

“May 25, 2010 at 17 :35 UTC

Cloud vortices off Isla Socorro, North Pacific

Satellite: Terra

To see the full image go to: www.flickr.com/photos/gsfc/4641459959

NASA/GSFC/Jeff Schmaltz/MODIS Land Rapid Response Team

To learn more about MODIS go to: rapidfire.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/gallery/?latest

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is home to the nation’s largest organization of combined scientists, engineers and technologists that build spacecraft, instruments and new technology to study the Earth, the sun, our solar system, and the universe.”


PROCEEDINGS OF THE CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES Fourth Series Vol. XIX, No. 2, pp. 7-12
June 4, 1930
II
MARINE MOLLUSCA OF THE REVILLAGIGEDO ISLANDS, MEXICO
BY A. M. STRONG AND G. D. HANNA

This report properly constitutes a part of the records of the
expedition of the California Academy of Sciences of 1925 to
various west Mexican islands.^ The collecting of marine mol-
lusca was placed in the hands of Eric K. Jordan and G. D.
Hanna who had a special request from Dr. W. H. Dall to do
the task as thoroughly as possible at Clarion and Socorro
islands. It appears that no previous visitors to these little-
frequented places had brought back more than a scattering of
shells and these were not sufficient to permit the detennination
of the relationships of the group. Indeed, Dr. Dall was led
to suppose from the few he had seen from Clarion Island’ that
an Indo- Pacific fauna was dominant there. Stearns^ in 1894
stated that: “Of Socorro, the principal island of the more
distant Revillagigedo group, we know but little or nothing.
It was visited several years ago by Grayson, the ornithologist.

For a general account of this expedition, see Proc. Calif. Acad. Sci., ser. 4, vol. 15, no. I, pp. 1-113, pis. 1-10, text figs. 1-7, March 30, 1926. Various technical reports based upon the collections obtained have appeared subsequently.”

Look from the Skies for Miracles and Wonders…

UCSF’s Stem Cell Center is Open – It’s the Craziest Building in Town – A 700-Foot Millipede Coming Down Mt. Sutro

Monday, November 29th, 2010

What’s the Next Big Thing in stem cell research? It’s got to be UCSF‘s shiny, brand-spanking-new, 700-foot-long Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research (CIRMbuilding from New Yawk-based Rafael Vinoly Architects.

Check it:

“The $123 million building is a series of split-level floors with terraced grass roofs and solar orientation. Open labs flow into each other, with office/interaction areas located on the circulation route between the labs, allowing for the entire research community in the building to interact.”

It’s the CIRM Worm! See?

Click to expand

It was the Modern Steel Construction Magazine cover girl earlier this year, or something, so that’s something to crow about.

As planned:

But this low-rise monster, in real life, somehow looks like:

An RV;

A boat;

A millipede; and

A Jawa Sandcrawler

And all at the same time.

Researchers have already moved in so let’s take a look why not.

Here’s the view coming up Medical Center Drive. This thing looks as if it will spring to life at any moment and start marching towards Parnassus, or Irving, to swallow a an N Judah or two:

This is how you build in Earthquake Country:

This is all the way up the hill where Med Center takes a hairpin. Kind of looks like an RV. Anterior Region in Lateral View:

Looking down the hill:

The clitellum:

And here, it sort of looks like a boat. See how it’s moored to Mount Sutro? (And hey, UCSF. Did you leave all the lights on for the entire four-day Thanksgiving weekend? O.K. fine.)

And here’s the gap betwixt floors:

Look through and you can see the ocean! (Or the bay, or the Golden Gate, or the estuary, whatever…)

Here’s the view from the roof, more or less, with a nice view of The Richmond and our Golden Gate Bridge

And here’s what we were promised, up on the roof:

And here’s what we got, it’s like weeds and International Orange chairs:

Maybe they’re still working on the vegetation.

And speaking of orange chairs, the theme continues inside:

Now, don’t fret about them concomitant radioactive materials up near the top…

…cause they have a nice outdoor shower to wash ‘em all away, Silkwood-style:

Leave us now depart the CIRM Worm:

Bon Courage, CIRM people!

They had a big party for the groundbreaking with Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger a couple years back, so maybe they’ll have another shindig for the official kickoff?

Read all about it or take a look at the video from back in the day.

2008 saw Arnold’s first visit ever to UCSF, so Chancellor J. Michael Bishop gave him the business about it.

The stars of the show were Arnie and Mr. Eli Broad

Was that a gold fleur-de-lys ring? Something like that.

Anyway, y’all come back.

All the deets:

The building, which will be located on the Parnassus Campus, will house 25 principal investigators and their teams at full capacity. It will be the headquarters of the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCSF, which will continue to include scientists across all UCSF campuses. The relocation of scientists into the building will free up space in existing laboratories/offices that will allow for additional recruitments. UCSF has recruited 16 new faculty members to the Center in the last three years. The building will be located near UCSF Medical Center, which will support the long-term goal of translating basic research findings to clinical trials.

Groundbreaking for the building, which has more than 46,000 assignable square feet and has four split-level floors, occurred in late August 2008, with completion of the project in late-2010.”

Design-Build Team:
General Contractor
DPR Construction, Inc., San Francisco
Fabricator and Erector
Schuff Steel – Pacific Division, Oakland/San Diego, Calif. (AISC Member)
Architect
SmithGroup, San Francisco
Structural Engineer
Forell/Elsesser Engineers, Inc., San Francisco
Preliminary Design Team:
Architect
Rafael Viñoly Architects, New York
Structural Engineer
Nabih Youssef Associates, San Francisco

OMG, See the Reindeer of Golden Gate Park From November 23 to January 2 – “Tis the Season for Science” at Cal Academy

Monday, November 22nd, 2010

Our California Academy of Sciences is gearing up for the holidays. They’re going to have reindeer and everything.

(Now, the San Francisco Zoo talks about having reindeer, but I suspect the animules they have are merely caribou. Oh well.)

Get ready!

Click to expand

All the deets!

“TIS THE SEASON FOR SCIENCE”  AT THE CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES
From November 23 – January 2, the Academy will celebrate the holiday season with a scientific twist.

SAN FRANCISCO (October 22, 2010) – From November 23 – January 2, the California Academy of Sciences will celebrate the holiday season with live reindeer, indoor snow flurries, and a suite of polar- and holiday-themed programs during “’Tis the Season for Science,” six weeks of wintry festivities and family fun with a scientific twist. Visitors can meet a pair of reindeer in-person, ask a botanist what “mistletoe” actually means, find out what causes the Northern Lights, and more, as they explore the “hows” and “whys” of life in some of Earth’s most frigid climates. Music, decorations, and a hot chocolate cart will complete the festive atmosphere.

Inside the Academy’s Piazza, visitors will find an Arctic wonderland, complete with an igloo presentation dome, holiday craft activities, and a stage for special presentations and shows including interviews with scientists, games of “Polar Jeopardy,” and a variety of music, dance, and theater performances. Young visitors can also greet “Santa Claude,” the Academy’s lovable alligator character, who will get into the holiday spirit with a Santa hat and scarf. Once an hour, an indoor snow flurry will dust the Piazza, against a backdrop of stunning photographs by Arctic National Wildlife Refuge photographer Subhankar Banerjee. Nearby, guests will get a closer look at a variety of rarely displayed Arctic specimens, including a polar bear, snowy owl, and snow geese.

Each day will feature festive performances and a schedule of programs and interactive activities that explore winter themes like migration, adaptations for extreme cold, sustainable gift-giving, and research in some of our planet’s coldest climes. ‘Tis the Season for Science activities are included with general admission tickets, unless otherwise noted. Visit www.calacademy.org/holidays in November for more details.


Special Program Highlights
November 23 – January 2

Reindeer Rendezvous – Daily
Visit the east garden to meet the two reindeer (also known as caribou in North America) that have come to visit the Academy for the holidays. Learn about the special adaptations that help these antlered herbivores survive in cold environments and travel great distances, and discover how they acquired such a special place in holiday traditions.

Polar Jeopardy – Daily
Think you know a thing or two about polar bears, emperor penguins, and the Northern Lights? Want to challenge your knowledge of Earth’s frozen caps? Or want to watch your friends and family put on their thinking caps? Come take part in this fun, interactive game show, and expand your polar expertise.

Festive Performers – Daily
The Academy has invited a variety of musicians, singers, dancers, theatrical groups, and other performers to help visitors celebrate this festive time of year. Enrich your family’s Academy visit with art and music from some of the Bay Area’s greatest talents.

Polar Perspectives – Shows daily
Step into the igloo presentation dome for a glimpse of the stark, vast beauty of the North Pole. Rotating 5-minute shows will tell the stories of the Northern Lights, polar ice caps, and the winter sky with stunning HD footage and twinkling stars.

“Chill Out” with an Academy Scientist – Weekly
Meet Academy scientists who study plants, animals, and climate change in some of the planet’s coldest environments. In their travels, these explorers have studied high-elevation ice beetles, Arctic migrations, frozen clams and warming ice caps. Join them for a fascinating look at their work to explore the world, discover new life, and help explain Earth’s amazing story.

Climate Science & Solutions – Weekly
Explore the science behind climate change through this high-energy and accessible presentation by the experts at Alliance for Climate Education (ACE). The topic of climate change can be daunting, but ACE’s fun and innovative approach helps us create positive and proactive responses to this global problem. Come curious and ready to be inspired!

Penguins + Pajamas Sleepover (Kids ages 6+ and their adult chaperones)
Tuesday, December 28
Why count sheep when you could count geckos, butterflies, sharks, and penguins? Now kids can camp out for a night at the California Academy of Sciences—and see the museum in a whole new light. Sleepovers include after-hours access to Academy exhibits, a special penguin talk, live animal demonstration, planetarium show, story time with cookies and milk, parking, breakfast, and more. Tickets $119 per person ($99 for Academy members), available at www.calacademy.org/sleepovers.

The “‘Tis the Season for Science” theme will also continue across regularly scheduled Academy programs, including Science Story Adventures, Family Nature Crafts, Specimen Spotlight, and Animal Tales.

The Academy will be closed on November 25 and December 25, and will observe extended hours (until 6pm) from November 26-28, December 26-30, and January 1-2.