Archive for the ‘science’ Category

Scholastic Summer Reading Challenge: Penguins + Pajamas + Your Family = Fun at the Academy of Sciences Sleepover This Friday

Wednesday, June 11th, 2014

Word comes from Scholastic that it will bring a bunch of books to San Francisco to promote its Summer Reading Challenge at this Friday’s Penguins + Pajamas event:

“The California Academy of Sciences will be hosting an “Penguins + Pajamas” event (their wildly popular kid museum sleepover) in partnership with the Scholastic Summer Reading Challenge on Friday June 13th at 6 p.m. CT.  

We plan on providing over 300 children’s books (The Magic School Bus: Lost in the Solar System), Harry Potter and The Magic School Bus posters Captain Underpants trading cards, WordGirl stickers, Scholastic Summer Reading Challenge glow-in-the-dark bookmarks, EVEREADY flashlights and batteries (our sponsor this year), tote bags, reading certificates, summer reading book lists and more as kids learn about the night sky at one the nation’s most well-respected and popular scientific and cultural institutions.”

That was the wind-up, now here’s the pitch:

“On Friday, June 13, join us for a Brain Power Sleepover. Explore the museum at night while you have fun putting your brain power to work. Solve mind-boggling puzzles, marvel at the stars in a late night planetarium show, participate in the 2014 Scholastic Summer Reading Challenge and get a free book! Learn about everything from brains to biology with interactive programs, live demos, and hands-on activities.”

(And if you’re going to do this, you might as well get a Membership, just saying.)

Just think, this could be you:

See you there!

California Coast: Our California Academy of Sciences Unveils a New 2,000-Gallon Aquarium Tank Brimming with Colorful Marine Life

Monday, June 9th, 2014

Here’s your brand-new 2000-gallon tank downstairs at our world-famous California Academy of Sciences in Golden Gate Park – let’s see here, we’ve got a Strawberry Anemone, a Greenstriped Rockfish, and a Vermillion Sea Star all in a row:

Click to expand

That’s the Rocky Reefs part of the new California Coast Exhibit.

(And if you want to see more of our California coasts, check out these great shots archived at Cold Water Images – it’s a colorful world down below.)

All right, see you there!

All the deets:

“Explore new views of the California Coast: California Academy of Sciences unveils new 2,000-gallon aquarium tank brimming with colorful marine life

SAN FRANCISCO (June 6, 2014) — Today, the Academy unveiled the latest addition to its aquarium—a colorful and charismatic 2,000-gallon tank filled with strawberry anemones, painted greenlings, and rosy rockfish, giving visitors a glimpse into the vibrant communities that thrive in California’s National Marine Sanctuaries. This striking addition to the Academy’s California Coast aquarium exhibit will become a permanent fixture and will offer spectacular new views and insights into these rich underwater ecosystems, from kelp forests filled with leopard sharks and wolf eels to rocky reefs blanketed in vibrant pink anemones and colorful corals.

“Presenting the wonders of the natural world is at the core of the Academy’s mission, and we’re thrilled to share this new addition to our aquarium with visitors,” says Bart Shepherd, Director of the Academy’s Steinhart Aquarium. “By showcasing the biodiversity found in our own backyard, we hope to engage and inspire visitors with the importance of studying and sustaining these ecosystems—locally and around the world.”

In addition to the exhibit’s larger tanks, a series of jewel tanks showcase some of the area’s most fascinating marine creatures, while interactive displays illustrate the migration pathways of sea turtles, humpback whales, and sharks that pass through these rich marine habitats.

At a Citizen Science station, visitors can contribute to an ongoing Academy research project—and learn more about how to protect California’s vibrant and vital coastal ecosystems. At the Discovery Tidepool, visitors can touch and examine a variety of ocean creatures, where aquarium biologists and docents help visitors of all ages interact with and learn about starfish, sea urchins, and other marine life native to the California coastline. Special magnifying cameras are also available, encouraging an unusually close look at tidepool residents.

In addition to the many informative and interactive exhibits, visitors can learn about marine biodiversity and the importance of sustaining these vibrant ocean ecosystems during daily programs, including:

Coral Reef Dive
Daily at 11:30 am and 2:30 pm
Watch as a diver suits up in SCUBA gear and plunges into the world’s deepest living coral reef exhibit. Outfitted with an underwater microphone, the diver will answer all of your reef-related questions.

Ocean Action – The Power of pH!
Daily at 1:00 pm
Have you ever wondered what sea shells, the ocean, and our atmosphere have in common? Come find out at this fun, experiment-based program as we explore the ocean and its special chemistry. Learn about the simple steps you can take to help keep oceans and the marine animals that live in them healthy.”

Meep Meep! – A Victorian Window Box Diorama on Page Street – “Roadrunner Roadrunner”

Monday, May 12th, 2014

As seen from Octavia “Boulevard”

Click to expand

M.I.A. would approve, certainly.

Crazy See-Through AT&T Building – Up Through Spiral Staircase to the Higher Ground – The Golden Age of Wireless

Wednesday, February 19th, 2014

In the cracked streets trampled under foot
Sidestep, sidewalk
I see you stare into space
Have I got closer now
Behind the face

Oh tell me
Charity dance with me
Turn me around tonight
Up through spiral staircase
To the higher ground

Slide show sea side town
Coca-Cola, football radio radio radio
Radio radio radio

San Francisco Press Release of the Day: Anthrax BIO-TERRORISM COUNTERACTION USING OZONE AND HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

Wednesday, January 29th, 2014

So, peroxide + ozone = dead anthrax?

News to me.

“Patent Protection Granted For The Elimination of Anthrax – The ability to remediate buildings following a weaponized biological attack may have been achieved with AsepticSure®

SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 29, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — Medizone International, Inc. (The Company) (MZEI:OB, MZEI:QB) has just been granted its fourth patent for its revolutionary enclosed space room disinfection system, AsepticSure. The United States Patent and Trademark Office has issued US Patent number 8,636,951 titled BIO-TERRORISM COUNTERACTION USING OZONE AND HYDROGEN PEROXIDE.

Following on the heels of patent protection being established for its health care related patent applications, the Company has now been awarded a patent for its government variant of AsepticSure intended for use by defense agencies as a response to a biological attack on critical buildings, infrastructure and resources.

Dr. Michael E. Shannon, Medizone International’s President explained, “At our Innovation Park, Queens University laboratories, we have been successful in completely eliminating Bacillus atropheus and Bacillus subtilis, both internationally recognized study surrogates for Anthrax, one of the most difficult weaponized pathogens to kill. Being able to eliminate these surrogates for Anthrax with our technology almost assures we now have the ability to remediate critical public infrastructure following a biological attack and restore it to service without damaging important and expensive equipment including communications systems. Militaries have struggled with this problem for decades and, until now, this simply has not been possible.”

“To now have patent protection granted for this system,” stated Edwin Marshall, Medizone’s CEO, “should allow the Company protected access to a potentially lucrative government market due to the unique capability of AsepticSure’s government variant.”

This Press Release may contain certain forward looking statements that could involve substantial risks and uncertainties, including, but not limited to, the results of ongoing clinical studies, economic conditions, product and technology development, production efficiencies, product demand, competitive products, competitive environment, successful testing and government regulatory issues. Additional risks are identified in the company’s filings made with the Securities and Exchange Commission.”

Al right, well, we’ll see…

NASA and American Geophysical Union to Host a “NASA Social” Dec. 4th – 20 People Will Win Invites – Ooh, James Cameron!

Thursday, November 15th, 2012

You can’t win if you don’t play, so sign up before tomorrow to get a chance to win an invite to nerd out with NASA in the 415 on December 4th, 2012.

Deets below.

She’s already applied:

All right, see you there!

“NASA, American Geophysical Union Host NASA Social In San Francisco

WASHINGTON, Nov. 14, 2012  — NASA and the American Geophysical Union are inviting social media followers to a unique behind-the-scenes NASA Social on Tuesday, Dec. 4, in San Francisco. The event will bring 20 social media users together with some of the world’s best and brightest scientific minds at the world’s largest Earth and solar system science conference.

NASA Socials are in-person meetings with people who engage with the agency through Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and other social networks. Participants will get special access to parts of the AGU meeting and meet with NASA and other scientists presenting research on Earth’s climate, deep ocean exploration and the latest findings from Mars. Additionally, guests will sit in on a press conference, attend a panel on deep ocean exploration with film-maker James Cameron and a NASA astrobiologist, explore the expansive exhibit hall, and meet fellow science enthusiasts who are active on social media.

Registration is open from noon EST Wednesday, Nov. 14, to 5 p.m. Friday, Nov. 16. NASA and the AGU will select 20 participants at random from Web registrants. Additional applicants will be placed on a waiting list. Because of space limitations, those selected will not be permitted to bring a guest. Each participant must be age 18 or older. For more NASA Social and sign up information, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/social

To join and track the conversation online during the NASA Socials, follow the hashtags #NASASocial and #AGU12.

The AGU Fall Meeting attracts as many as 20,000 attendees and offers a platform for scientists to present their most cutting-edge work. For more information on the meeting, visit:

http://fallmeeting.agu.org/2012

SOURCE  NASA

Web Site: http://www.nasa.gov

OMG, It’s Your Summer of NightLife! Thursdays at the Academy of Sciences – Pride, Gallery Crawl, Soundwave, More!

Tuesday, June 19th, 2012

As they say:

NightLife events in July 2012 at the California Academy of Sciencesevery Thursday night is different.”

Which one will you attend next?

Deets below.

Put a little swaggr into your Thorsdagr why not? Thusly:

Click to boogie

California Academy of Sciences

Remember, I love the Nightlife…

See you there!

June 21
Pride NightLife
Kick off your celebration of SF Pride weekend at NightLife. In the Piazza, Heklina of Trannyshack will host a fabulous drag performance and “tranimal” costume contest. Carol Queen & Robert Lawrence, co-founders of the Center for Sex and Culture, will give a talk titled “Seven Billion Sexual Orientations” about supporting sexual individuality and diversity. In the planetarium, don’t miss “Stargayzing” at 6:30—a look at the mythology behind some of your favorite constellations—followed by two showings of Earthquake. Plus, hear tales of sex-changing fish and other fascinating animals from an aquarium biologist, and enjoy activities and information from organizations like Hard French SF, Rainbow World Fund, Gay & Lesbian Sierrans, and AIDS Memorial Grove. Entertainment in the east pavilion by San Francisco icon Juanita More and the Stay Gold DJs. Additional music by Hard French DJs Carnita & Brown Amy in the coral reef.

June 28
Gallery Crawl NightLife
For one night only, the Academy will transform into a pop-up art museum, featuring guest curators who will each take over a portion of the space with hand-picked collections that reflect their take on the intersection of art and science. See the selections of Tenderloin art pushers Ever Gold Gallery; Michael Cuffe, founder of online arts publication Warholian; Spoke Art, San Francisco’s newest art gallery and publishing house; writer/curator/street art aficionado Adam Reed Rozan; and Electric Works Gallery, which tends to focus on contemporary art work balancing strong graphic and conceptual elements; and other guest curators others to be announced. Live music performance by Tim Cohen’s band Magic Trick, whose music evokes the early era of rock ‘n’ roll with hints of psychedelic pop. Additional music by Britt Govea, DJ and founder of (((folkYEAH!))), whose sets feature contemporary and cutting edge artists who bridge a large gap of musical sounds and styles. Music presented by (((folkYEAH!))).

July 5
Soundwave NightLife
Celebrate opening night of San Francisco’s innovative three-month art and music festival, Soundwave, presented by MEDIATE and The Bold Italic. The night features a blend of art, science and sound around this year’s festival theme: challenging audiences to question their perspectives on the present and our hopes and fears about the future. Futuristic space rock band Lumerians performs in the piazza, musician Matt Baldwin will play amongst the fish in the coral reef, and guitarist Danny Paul Grody will play the skies of the Aurora Borealis in a mini-planetarium, with DJ Tristes Tropiques spinning the night away with disco house/post-punk tunes. Select Soundwave artists will present interactive demonstrations that explore future experiences of sound and technology, including Les Stuck’s video dance sensors, The Cellar Ensemble’s sound/light oracle instrument, Jay Kreimer’s empathic facial responder and instruments, Drew Detweiler’s Lumisketch, and Stephen Hurrel’s live sounds of the moving Earth. Plus, Apocalypse Cakes author Shannon O’Malley will serve samples and read from her guide to doomsday desserts.

July 12
Disposable Film Fest NightLife
This week, NightLife and the Disposable Film Festival want you to do it yourself. What’s a disposable film, you ask? A short film made on a non-professional device, so DIY is the phrase of the night. At Disposable Filmmaking 101, pick up tips and tricks for creating a masterpiece with whatever camera you have on you (even your cell phone). Discover the latest and greatest gadgets, apps and hacks you should have in your toolkit from the experts at PhotoJoJo, Boom Grip and Veetle, and then practice your storytelling at the flipbook animation booth and interviewing workshop. Attend a food filmmaking workshop and learn how to make food prep look glamorous on-camera. Stop by the Public Bikes station and contribute your story to their bike advocacy video. Disposable Film Festival’s 2012 competitive shorts will be shown throughout the night in the Forum Theater. Music by Slayers Club.

July 19
Mixology, Mixtapes and Remixes at NightLife
NightLife stirs things up with Noise Pop this week. Watch the mixologists at Cocktail Lab work their magic during demonstrations using seasonal ingredients. The San Francisco Mixtape Society will host a mixtape swap, so come prepared with a mix tape, mix CD or mix USB stick inspired by the theme of Night Creatures. You’ll walk away with someone else’s mix and a smile on your face. Watch masterful DJs remix a track before your eyes and ears in the Remix Lounge, featuring Friendzone at 6:00, Yalls at 7:00, and Giraffage at 8:00. Music in the Piazza, presented by Noise Pop, is by Heathered Pearls [Ghostly International, ISO50], followed by Dan the Automator. Renowned in underground circles for spearheading critically acclaimed underground projects Handsome Boy Modeling School with Prince Paul, and Deltron 3030 with Del tha Funkee Homosapien, Dan the Automator is perhaps best known as a co-founder of the widely successful anime influenced trip-hop project Gorillaz.

July 26
Runner’s NightLife
In honor of the 35th annual San Francisco Marathon, NightLife celebrates athletes who hit the pavement to push their limits mile after mile. Learn how to take care of your soles with a talk on foot and grounding massage by the SF School of Massage; stop by African Hall for a deep tissue massage and Jamba Juice sample; and make your own headbands and wristbands with SCRAP. Learn why ostriches are the fastest animals on two feet, clocking in at up to 43 mph. In the planetarium, catch the “Messier Marathon” at 6:30, a look at some of the 110 deep sky objects documented by astronomer Charles Messier, followed by two screenings of Earthquake: Evidence of a Restless Planet. Enter the “Runners Have Soul” fashion contest with your best 60s-70s soul–inspired look. Plus, Academy microbiologist Shannon Bennett will be on-hand to discuss her work with mosquitoes, and to conduct a eyebrow mite survey of NightLife guests. Hint: chances are you have them, and no, you can’t outrun them. But the good news is, they’re harmless! Music by the soul/boogie DJs Gordo Cabeza & Timoteo Gigante (MOMSF).

NightLife Basics:

What: NightLife at the California Academy of Sciences (for adults ages 21+) featuring music, cutting-edge science, and food and cocktails available for purchase

When: Every Thursday, 6-10 pm

Where: California Academy of Sciences, 55 Music Concourse Drive, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco

Cost: $12 per person ($10 for Academy members); Tickets available at the door or online at https://www.calacademy.org/tickets/nl.phpWeekly Details: Available at www.calacademy.org/nightlife

Lockheed Martin Sun Scientist Dr. Alan M. Title Honored With 2011 American Geophysical Union Medal in San Francisco

Friday, December 9th, 2011

The big 2011 AGU convention is winding down in San Francisco with news of a bay area physicist winning the big award.

Congratulations Dr. Alan M. Title!

Click to expand

All the deets:

“Lockheed Martin Physicist Honored With 2011 American Geophysical Union John Adam Fleming Medal

PALO ALTO, Calif., Dec. 8, 2011  — Dr. Alan M. Title, physicist at the Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) Space Systems Advanced Technology Center (ATC) in Palo Alto, was honored last evening with the 2011 John Adam Fleming Medal, at a ceremony at the 2011 Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) in San Francisco. The Fleming Medal is awarded not more than once annually to an individual “for original research and technical leadership in geomagnetism, atmospheric electricity, aeronomy, space physics, and related sciences.”

Established in 1960, the Fleming Medal is named in honor of John Adam Fleming, who made important contributions to the establishment of magnetic standards and measurements. Fleming served as AGU officer in a number of positions, including: secretary of the Terrestrial Magnetism and Atmospheric Electricity section (1920-1929), Union General Secretary (1925-1947), and honorary president (1947-1956). John Adam Fleming was associated with the science of geomagnetism throughout his career, and with the American Geophysical Union from its founding until his death.

As a scientist, Alan Title studies the Sun.  His primary research interest is the generation, distribution, and effects of the solar magnetic field throughout the Sun’s interior and outer atmosphere. Using spectral imaging techniques we now can map both horizontal and vertical flows in the solar interior and surface. Flow maps have shown among other things how the solar interior rotates as a function of radius. This profile is essential for any understanding of interior magnetic field generation – dynamo action. Magnetic fields can be measured in the photosphere and inferred in the interior and outer atmosphere. Using these techniques it has been discovered that magnetic field emerges everywhere on the solar surface at a rate sufficient to completely replace the fields outside of active regions in less than a day, and even active region fields are replace in at most a few weeks. The detailed mechanisms by which magnetic energy is released is currently the focus of his research. At present, he has 169 articles in refereed journals. Building on accumulated knowledge, through observation and experimentation, he asks new questions of the Sun and formulates hypotheses on how it might work.

As an engineer, Alan Title designs, develops, builds, and flies new instruments that will gather the data necessary to test those hypotheses. He led the development of tunable bandpass filters for space-based solar observations, a version of which is currently operating on the JAXA/ISAS Hinode spacecraft.  He also invented a tunable variation of the Michelson Interferometer that has been employed on the SOHO spacecraft, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the Global Oscillations Network Group of the National Solar Observatory as well as other ground-based systems.

Extraordinarily dedicated to advancing public awareness of science, Dr. Title has supported activities at the Tech Museum, Chabot Observatory, Boston Museum of Science, the National Air and Space Museum, and the Hayden Planetarium. In addition, his educational outreach funding has supported a yearly summer program for Stanford undergraduates, and the Stanford Hass Center activities that develop science programs for K-12 classrooms. And for two decades, promising students from the Palo Alto High School District have come to work in his laboratory.

Ever more deets, after the jump

(more…)

Tomorrow’s Mission to Mars Will be a Lot Bigger Than NASA’s Previous Efforts – Meet the Mars Science Laboratory’s Curiosity Rover

Friday, November 25th, 2011

When you’re on a mission to M/A/R/R/S, you gots to pump up the volume, like how NASA is doing with tomorrow’s launch of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL).

Check out this shot showing the size of the new rover’s wheels, via our California Academy of Sciences.

Three rover wheels at #NASAtweetup show the relative sizes for Curiosity, Spirit/Opportunity, and Pathfinder:

Click to expand

Check it:

Curiosity will be five times as large, and carry more than ten times the mass of scientific instruments as the Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit or Opportunity.”

Here’s a family portrait:

Via NASA/JPL

Bon Courage, NASA

NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory mission is preparing to set down a large, mobile laboratory — the rover Curiosity — using precision landing technology that makes many of Mars’ most intriguing regions viable destinations for the first time. During the 23 months after landing, Curiosity will analyze dozens of samples drilled from rocks or scooped from the ground as it explores with greater range than any previous Mars rover.

Curiosity will carry the most advanced payload of scientific gear ever used on Mars’ surface, a payload more than 10 times as massive as those of earlier Mars rovers. Its assignment: Investigate whether conditions have been favorable for microbial life and for preserving clues in the rocks about possible past life.

Plans for the Mars Science Laboratory call for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, between Nov. 25 and Dec.18, 2011, and arrival at Mars in August 2012.

The spacecraft has been designed to steer itself during descent through Mars’ atmosphere with a series of S-curve maneuvers similar to those used by astronauts piloting NASA space shuttles. During the three minutes before touchdown, the spacecraft slows its descent with a parachute, then uses retro rockets mounted around the rim of an upper stage. In the final seconds, the upper stage acts as a sky crane, lowering the upright rover on a tether to the surface.

Curiosity is about twice as long (about 3 meters or 10 feet) and five times as heavy as NASA’s twin Mars Exploration Rovers, Spirit and Opportunity, launched in 2003. It inherited many design elements from them, including six-wheel drive, a rocker-bogie suspension system and cameras mounted on a mast to help the mission’s team on Earth select exploration targets and driving routes. Unlike earlier rovers, Curiosity carries equipment to gather samples of rocks and soil, process them and distribute them to onboard test chambers inside analytical instruments”

“Tis the Season for Science” at Our California Academy of Sciences – Snow! Reindeer! Spice Forest! Performances!

Tuesday, November 22nd, 2011

Tis the Season for Science at the California Academy of Sciences.

Check it:

“From November 23, 2011 – January 16, 2012 the Academy will offer a suite of wintry festivities and family fun that will celebrate the science behind some of our most familiar holiday sights, sounds, and traditions. Highlights include:

A pair of live reindeer

Indoor snow flurries twice an hour

A Snowman Theater – an immersive digital dome shaped like a giant snowman, which will play two new shows on the science of snow

An aromatic Spice Forest – displays of the raw botanical specimens from which we get cinnamon, nutmeg, vanilla, and other holiday ingredients

Festive programs including quiz shows, live music, dance, and theater performances

Mounted specimens of the birds mentioned in “The Twelve Days of Christmas,” including swans, geese, colly birds, hens, doves, and a partridge in a pear tree.”

Remember RLGC – Reindeer Love Graham Crackers. Hey kids, name this reindeer! (She’s a girl, BTW.)

Click to expand

And here’s what these critters looked like when they were on the famous roof, via an iPhone 4:

This is Miles – he’s a fool for pine branches, I’ll tell you:

Les mise-en-scene:

One of four Evaporative Snow machines:

Le Theatre de Bonhomme de Neige – they’ve got two short films to show once you get inside:

The aromatic Spice Forest lets you smell stuff like nutmeg and vanilla:

And a partridge in a pear tree:

See you there!