Posts Tagged ‘1975’

The Only Thing Owners of Aging BMW 2002′s Want from Modern BMWs are Tiny Wheels, Apparently

Monday, January 6th, 2014

I’m sure the 1975 3-series was better in every way compared with the 1974 BMW 2002. The problem is that everybody loves the 2002 but nobody loves the 320i E21.

The wheels for the E21 are oftentimes seen on 2002′s – that’s all the owners seem interested in:

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How sad!

Dirty Harry 1970′s Time Capsule: Groove on KGO’s Orange Chopper and KPIX 5′s Robin’s Egg Blue Van

Monday, May 23rd, 2011

Well, Dirty Harry debuted 40 years ago so let’s use his movie series to see what the 415 looked like back in the 1970′s.

From The Enforcer, here’s KGO Radio’s groovy orange Bell 47J Ranger, looking not that much different from the choppers they used on M*A*S*H*.

Above the old Embarcadero Freeway and close to the build site for Embarcadero 4 (our youngest Embarcadero, it turns out) and Embarcadero 5,  the crazy Hyatt Regency Embarcadero Hotel:

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And back then, the Equinox revolving restaurant actually revolved. See it atop the Hyatt?

“The Hyatt Regency San Francisco is a large, imposing exposed concrete structure. It was built in 1972, designed by notorious architect John Portman. He is known for his outlandish designs. The Hyatt Regency here is no exception. It’s hard to describe, but I’ll try. It was built as a modern concrete structure around an atrium with extensive use of odd angles…presumably to take advantage of the odd, triangular-shaped property and beautiful bay/city views. From some angles it looks like a normal building, others like a pyramid, and from yet others like spires shooting up to the sky. It’s extremely unique and enjoyable to look at by us architecture and engineering dweebs. To everyone else, it’s a big gaudy hotel that is seriously starting to look dated architecturally.”

Now here’s Harry leaving City Hall back in the mid-1970′s – can you imagine an uglier color than this blue?

I can’t.

Anyway, stay groovy…

Dream of Blue Angels / Dream of Blue Turtles: Remembering Sting’s Pro-Global Warming Song from 1985

Tuesday, February 22nd, 2011

Don’t have an illustration of a blue turtle dream so this shot will have to do.

If you don’t recognize these planes, this bridge and that bit of land, well then welcome to San Francisco, stranger:

Click to dream

OK then. Now what about Five Star Rated The Dream of the Blue Turtles from a quarter-century ago? In it there’s a song We Work the Black Seam,* which is about the glories of coal and coal mining unions and the evils of nuclear power. Which is rather the opposite of how many look at things these days.

Take a look below if you wish.

And if you’re old enough to be familiar that tune, well then check out this version from a decade earlier. Wow, that’s heavy, man.

*In which Sting riffs on William Blake’s Jerusalem,** among other things. And it’s not this kind of black seam, it’s this kind.

** Speaking of the old days and unions and the Golden Gate Bridge, wasn’t it the workers of the GGB who started up labor actions rather than work side-by-side with black people about four decades ago? Yes. I don’t remember it myself, but it was during my lifetime.***

***And I’m not that old – my grandmother just bought a Hyundai and she plans on outliving it…

This place has changed for good
Your economic theory said it would
It’s hard for us to understand
We can’t give up our jobs the way we should
Our blood has stained the coal
We tunneled deep inside the nation’s soul
We matter more than pounds and pence
Your economic theory makes no sense

One day in a nuclear age
They may understand our rage
They build machines that they can’t control
And bury the waste in a great big hole
Power was to become cheap and clean
Grimy faces were never seen
But deadly for twelve thousand years is carbon fourteen****

We work the black seam together
We work the black seam together

The seam lies underground
Three million years of pressure packed it down
We walk through ancient forest lands
And light a thousand cities with our hands
Your dark satanic mills
Have made redundant all our mining skills
You can’t exchange a six inch band
For all the poisoned streams in Cumberland

One day in a nuclear age
They may understand our rage
They build machines that they can’t control
And bury the waste in a great big hole
Power was to become cheap and clean
Grimy faces were never seen
But deadly for twelve thousand years is carbon fourteen

We work the black seam together
We work the black seam together

Our conscious lives run deep
You cling onto your mountain while we sleep
This way of life is part of me
There is no price so only let me be
And should the children weep
The turning world will sing their souls to sleep
When you have sunk without a trace
The universe will suck me into place

One day in a nuclear age
They may understand our rage
They build machines that they can’t control
And bury the waste in a great big hole
Power was to become cheap and clean
Grimy faces were never seen
But deadly for twelve thousand years is carbon fourteen

We work the black seam together
We work the black seam together

****Uh, not really Sting, but anyway.

Is This Chevy Caprice Classic Convertible Truly an Icon of 1975?

Wednesday, July 7th, 2010

I say sure, why not?

Now let the Chevrolet slide:

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Can you picture these guys creeping down a back street on deez and/or picking up women, literally?

I can.

222 inches never looked so good

Remembering Charles Gain, the Last SFPD Police Chief to Wear a Suit More than a Uniform

Wednesday, October 7th, 2009

New San Francisco Police Chief George Gascón is becoming known for donning a suit more often than a uniform, per this bit from CW Nevius. Now the last time we had a chief like that was from 1975-1980, when “outsiderCharles Gain ran the SFPD.

Did Chief Gain really have all of San Francisco’s police cars painted soft pale blue and did he really replace the seven-pointed SFPD stars on the doors with the San Francisco Seal avec an encircling ”POLICE SERVICES” motif?

Yes, yes he did. How friendly!

gain copy

Can you imagine?

Looks like the seven-pointed star made it onto the trunks, though. As seen in Milk:

blue copy

Now what do you think the union thought about that? Not much.

Mayor Dianne Feinstein asked for his resignation in 1979 after the White Night Riots and he was replaced in 1980.

And now San Francisco’s “black-and-whites” are black and white again, with stars and everything.

Don’t expect that to change anytime soon.