Posts Tagged ‘1994’

Welcome Back, Terracotta: China’s Famous Terracotta Warriors Coming Back to Our Asian Art Museum February 22, 2013

Thursday, August 16th, 2012

They’re ba-aaack!

Armored General, Qin dynasty 221-206 BCE, Height 203 cm, weight 250 kg. Excavated from Pit 1, Qin Shihuang tomb complex, 1980. Reproduced with kind permission from the Qin Shihuang Terracotta Warriors and Horses Museum. Serial number 002747.

All the deets:

“CHINA’S TERRACOTTA WARRIORS:THE FIRST EMPEROR’S LEGACY - Asian Art Museum kicks off 10th anniversary in Civic Center with epic exhibition

SAN FRANCISCO, August 15, 2012—The Asian Art Museum kicks off its 10th anniversary in San Francisco’s Civic Center with an exhibition from one of the greatest archaeological discoveries in modern time. China’s Terracotta Warriors: The First Emperor’s Legacy will be on view February 22 – May 27, 2013.

The exhibition features 120 rare objects from the great tomb complex of China’s First Emperor (259-210 BCE), including 10 life-size terracotta figures—the maximum number of figures permitted outside China in a single exhibition.

Captivating the world since its discovery in 1974, the First Emperor’s tomb complex is one of the largest burial sites ever constructed. Estimated at nearly 250,000 square feet—or more than four American football fields—it includes a scale replica of the emperor’s imperial palace, complete with stables, offices, an armory and even a zoo. Ancient historians also described “flowing rivers” of mercury, of which trace amounts have recently been confirmed by scientists.

Perhaps most impressive are the estimated 8,000 terracotta figures excavated to date, including warriors of all ranks (all individually constructed, no two faces are alike), acrobats, musicians and horses. The tomb complex took 700,000 laborers nearly 40 years to build.

In 1994, the museum, then located in Golden Gate Park, was among the first to present the terracotta warriors to a U.S. audience. The 2013 exhibition offers a new generation of visitors the rare chance to view the clay figures up close. Visitors will also discover new secrets from the tomb, with more information than ever before on the First Emperor, his reign, and his quest for immortality.

“Celebrating 10 years in our Civic Center home calls for something extraordinary,” said Jay Xu, executive director, Asian Art Museum. “In China, history is being unearthed. Bringing a chapter of this epic story to San Francisco—with 10 life-size sculptures from one of the most significant discoveries of our time—is a great way to commemorate this occasion.”

EXHIBITION TICKETS: $8-$22
Advance tickets go on sale October 16, 2012
More info: www.asianart.org/terracotta-warriors

The Rare Anthony Green Herons of Golden Gate Park

Friday, June 8th, 2012

Via David Cruz:

“A common species on earth however rare for Golden Gate Park, San Francisco.

Joseph Mailliard listed it as a rarity during the summers at Golden Gate Park in his book “The Birds of Golden Gate Park” published in 1930. At the time it was referred to as an “Anthony Green Heron” p.24.”

Here’s a shot from the former Strybing Arboretum eight years ago, when there were a few about.

(That was from before paywall went up at Strybing Arboretum. The Board of Supervisors said that they would revisit the issue of charging for admission at the “San Francisco Botanical Garden” if things didn’t work out and, actually, things didn’t work out, but I don’t think anybody’s going to seriously reconsider the pay gates.* Oh well. So, I’m never going back there. Oh well.)

*Uh RPD, do you want ideas about what to do instead of blindly following whatever the Botanical Society tells you to do? Oh, not really? OK. Uh, RPD, don’t you know that everybody knows that you were lying about the projected attendance figures in the post-paywall era? You do? Good. But the attendance figures are much lower than what you were actually expecting, right? And what you were actually expecting was a lot lower than what you said you were expecting, right? And you’re cool with that, and you had no other options at all, RPD, so this is the greatest thing ever, right? OK fine.

 

Gold Mountain Mural in North Beach is Gone, Long Gone, Owing to Graffiti Vandals – Why We Can’t Have Nice Things

Friday, March 9th, 2012

The news of this mural going away had escaped my attention the past couple of months.

Here’s what it looked like before….

…and here’s what it looks like now:

Click to expand

Here are your reading notes:

Gen Fujioka of the Chinatown Community Development Center is involved with promoting the horrible Central Subway to Nowhere.

Artist Ann Sherry is fortunate to get a five-figure commission for anything, so I’m not sure why she’s so perpetually cranky. 

It’s not smart to put up images of authority figures (you know, people in military of police uniforms) in a sort of wild part of town

I don’t know, maybe this was a bad idea from the start?

I don’t know, maybe San Francisco government has lots of bad ideas, you know, from the start?

What can we learn from this episode?

The Longest-Lived Mural Graffiti in San Francisco – Epoxy Plus Paint Equals Forever

Tuesday, March 16th, 2010

Here’s what the little monsters know – they know that if they tag a big old transformer box or what have you, then it’ll simply get painted over by the City or a property owner, sometimes with a quickness. But painting over a mural, such as the one called Gold Mountain at Romolo Place in North Beach near the intersection of Columbus and Broadway, well that throws all the stakeholders into paralysis and so scribblings will remain for tout le monde to see.

Ideally, you’d have the original muralist come over and do a touchup for free. Ideally. But the long-lived tagging on Gold Mountain has epoxy in it, so it’s really hard to take off of the wall without erasing everything. And then after you do a fix-up another tagger will come along, despite your use of anti-graffiti coatings and whatnot.

Here, take a look at the mural on Romolo from six-plus years ago – nice and clean.

But WholeWheatToast‘s photo from 2008 looks just like every other recent photo that you can find online:

Click to expand

Here’s the current shot from Google Maps. (Note that Google’s face-blurring privacy program doesn’t distinguish betwixt real people and paintings of people.)

And the pic on MapJack looks the same as well. Oh well.

Now honestly, I’m not sure how much good putting up video cameras would do unless you had somebody to watch a live feed 24-7. I mean the value of showing the SFPD grainy night-time footage of some skinny, 5′ 8″, hoodie-wearing hood isn’t much, right?

For all I know these tags are still there today, with more added on, possibly. I’ll check it out the next time I’m in the area.

(San FranciscoThe City That Knows How®… to sit around and dawdle. Oh well.)

Leaving you with what the Chinatown Community Development Center has to say about all this:

“Gold Mountain Mural Restoration

The Gold Mountain Mural is located at Romolo Alley, near Broadway and Columbus, on the side of the Swiss American building owned and managed by Chinatown CDC. It is the joint effort of Ms. Ann Sherry, the muralist, and Chinatown CDC depicting the lives of Chinese Americans in San Francisco. It was created in 1994, and once restored in 2004 due to heavy tagging. At that time, to honor her, we added the image of our local heroine, Ms. Betty Ann Ong. Ms. Ong is the American Airline stewardess who was the first one to contact ground crew informing them of the plane being hijacked on that fatal flight into the World Trade Center on 9/11.

Recently, this historic mural caught the eyes of the President of the National Museum of Murals and Mosaics in Philadelphia, and will be featured in their online museum website.

Once again, due to tagging, we will start restoring the mural in the near future. We have so far secured some funding to install surveillance cameras to safeguard the mural. Once restoration is complete, we will daily monitor the mural and assist the SFPD to apprehend taggers. (Volunteers interested to help can contact Cathie Lam at 415-984-1461.)

“Korean Comics: A Society Through Small Frames” Coming to the Main Library March 13th

Friday, March 5th, 2010

Here’s what’s coming up at your free San Francisco Public Library:

“Korean Comics: A Society Through Small Frames – Exhibition in the Library’s Jewett Gallery, March 13th – June 13th, 2010. San Francisco Public Library is pleased to present, Korean Comics: A Society Through Small Frames, an exhibition of 83 framed works by 21 of Korea’s most talented cartoonists drawn over a period of four decades, on view March 13–June 13 in the Jewett Gallery at the Main Library, 100 Larkin St.”

O.K. then.

I, for one, welcome our new insect overlords. Oh, wait a second, this is the cover of North Korea’s version of Animal Farm. I forget which one is the Queen Bee, is it the Dear Leader, the Great Leader? One of them, anyway. Good times:  

Cho Pyŏng-Kwon (Story) / Im Wal-Yong (Art), The Great General Mighty Wing (1994), Published in 1994 by Gold Star Children’s Press

All the deets, after the jump

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Supervisor Eric Mar Calls for More Protections Against Second-Hand Smoke

Monday, February 1st, 2010

[UPDATE: Joshua Sabatini has an update – the next committee hearing will be on February 22, 2010.]

Your San Francisco Supervisor Eric Mar wants to expand Article 19F of the San Francisco Public Health Code – you know, the one from 1994 that prohibits smoking in enclosed areas and sports stadiums.

Check out the current rules after the jump, but don’t get used to them as they could be changing soon. This afternoon’s meeting of the Board of Supervisors Committee on Land Use & Economic Development could lead to some changes.

A graphic from this afternoon’s rally – secondhand smoke levels from outdoor dining areas at two unnamed cafes in North Beach are considered dangerous by the EPA:

80 souls were there before the committee meeting began:

Eric Mar and supporters enjoying a healthy smoke-free ride in the Richmond District back in 2008:

Brace yourselves: 

COMMUNITY RALLY TO SUPPORT EXPANDING PROTECTIONS FROM SECOND HAND SMOKE 

     Rally & Press Conference Before the Board of Supervisors Committee
      Hearing on Ordinance that Closes the Gaps in Public Health Code 
                        Polk Street City Hall Steps
                      Monday, February 1 at 12:00 noon 
  WHAT:    A rally and press conference to support an ordinance that will
           expand protection from second hand smoke by closing gaps in the
           San Francisco Public Health Code.  San Francisco is poised to
           join 18 other Bay Area cities in offering protection from
           second hand smoke by prohibiting smoking in many outdoor areas
           such as farmers markets, outdoor dining areas, theater and ATM
           lines, hotel and motel lobby areas, and other places frequented
           by members of the public.  The rally will convene just before
           the meeting of the Board of Supervisors Committee on Land Use &
           Economic Development, which will hear the proposed legislation
           for the first time. 
  WHO: A large crowd of community members including families, tenants,
           tenant advocates, members of the Chinese Progressive
           Association and San Francisco Tobacco Free Coalition;
           Supervisor Eric Mar, Supervisor John Avalos, Jul Lynn Parsons
           (Co-Chair of Mayor’s Disability Council), Carol McGruder
           (Tobacco Free Coalition member); Alex Tom (Tobacco Free
           Coalition; Chinese Progressive Association) and others. 

  BACKGROUND: 

The proposed ordinance would update Article 19F of the San Francisco Health Code, the landmark legislation adopted in 1994 that protects residents and visitors from second hand smoke. If approved by the Board of Supervisors and signed by the Mayor, San Francisco would join a long list of other Bay Area cities that have already expanded protection from second hand smoke for their residents to include many outdoor areas. 

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Can Your Chevy Impala SS Handle 26 Inch Wheels? Well, This One Can

Monday, April 21st, 2008

Of course, a few adjustments were necessary…
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