Posts Tagged ‘ac72’

Harsh: “Hitler Reacts to Oracle Team USA’s America’s Cup Loss” – This is How the “FaceBook Generation” Rolls

Thursday, September 12th, 2013

This bit here has elements that are somewhat old and hackneyed, and yet it’s also brand new and it’s also informative:

Actual Sailors Weigh In on Christopher Caen’s Bizarre Attack on the Respected America’s Cup International Jury

Friday, September 6th, 2013

Well, I guess you have to start off with this:

Cup of Caen: Follow the Money

So that’s what I’m calling a Bizarre Attack on the Respected America’s Cup International Jury.*

(Speaking of our ill-starred America’s Cup, here’s the latest estimate on how much money we’re going to lose on it, from SF Weekly’s Joe Eskenazi.)

Of course, all the jurors are Sailors.

Is Chris Caen, son of Famous Writer Herb Caen, a Sailor? I don’t know. He sailed a bit in colledge and probably some since, but IDK.

Am I a Sailor? Nope, but oddly enough, I have more experience sailing cats around San Francisco Bay (even if you throw in his recent quid pro quo joyride on an overly-expensive, overpowered and fragile “AC72″ boat, which I don’t).

Oh, but here are some Sailors, and here’s their reaction to what you can find in the link above:

“ISAF’s been shoved in the background over a few AC cycles now. Caen’s premise is way off base. If ISAF wanted to ‘get back at’ or ‘discredit’ the EA, they’ve had a couple of cup cycles to do so.”

“Wow! That really IS tinfoil hat material, isn’t it?”

“Of course the ISAF’s trying to elbow the ACEA out of the picture for the money. Yes, “follow the money!” Starting with the millions San Francisco taxpayers sunk into this unlucrative venture, the tens of thousands the ACEA is spending on unpopulated spectator facilities, etc, etc. Oh, and those fat broadcast contracts? Anyone else notice that the principal sponsor for the U.S. LVC coverage was ORACLE?”

“Yes, he is way, way off the mark on this one.”

I don’t know if Caen is just stupid, lazy, or deceitful, but that article is so full of fallacies and false pretense that it is embarrassing.  He mentions the Oneworld scandal of stolen design information, but then says points have never been taken away from boats in the AC in this way (Oneworld was penalized one point exactly in the same way Oracle has been penalized – two points in each round they would have gotten to including the AC…the fact they didn’t get to the AC is irrelevant as the penalty was there).  He claims ACEA is a new way of managing the cup, but it follows very similarly to the model set forth by Alinghi with ACM.”

“What a ridiculous article. All you need to do is look at the IJ members and their past to know that these are not ISAF lackeys. Guys like Bryan Willis have been involved with the AC for years and years and are not part of the whole ISAF scene. The article couldn’t be further from the truth and is a rather pathetic piece of journalism.”

With sloppy journalism like this, I suspect he could have easily been “fed the story” by someone else with an agenda. Journalism around the world aint what it used to be.”

“…conversant with things like ISAF, AC protocols, the IJ, the ACRM and the ACEA, yet he wrote as though he had a really good handle on things. He clearly did not. HuffPost should be straightened out on that fact, but not by me. Mr Caen should clearly be educated before he passes out more incorrect ,critical, information/disinformation.”

“Quite. It’s a very silly piece indeed. The assumption that it is the IJ that wanted confidentiality is risible and the conflation of the IJ with ISAF is either ignorant or mischievous. Oh and it’s not “respected mainsail trimmer Dirk de Ridder”. I’m afraid it is “formerly respected mainsail trimmer Dirk de Ridder.”

“My general feeling is I don’t expect the average person let alone viewer to have an intimate understanding of the history of the Cup, but then I also don’t expect them to write an opinion piece on the subject either.  If you are going to write such and article, and portray an opinion such as his, then you damn well better check your facts.  He had some clue as to the Oneworld case as he mentions it as a past transgression, but didn’t bother to do the research to determine what the penalty was.  My point is we shouldn’t respect an opinion that is so ill informed as the basis of his opinion is wrong.  You can’t come to an informed opinion if you are not informed.”

“I replied to his twitter link to the article yesterday that he should check his facts with regard to the OneWorld case and a similar penalty which was retweeted by the SFCitizen, but have not received a response.  I would think a respectable journalist would want to make a correction if he was ill informed.  I am not a professional journalist, but have written a few articles for sailing mags (and won two marine writers awards for them) and if I made a mistake, especially one that was important to my conclusions, I would certainly do everything in my power to correct that.”

The jury is an ACEA body hired by GGYC and Oracle in conjunction with their challenger of record/poodle and now you say they are ISAF? I hope ISAF (the real ISAF jury) goes ahead and penalize all of the perpetrators even further so that there is NO mistake who is who.”

Oh, and here’s “Bob303,” who may or may not be a Sailor:

“The penalty only doesn’t make sense if you seek a lack of sense. Oracle created the situation by which they have been penalised when they wrote the protocol for this cup cycle. It is entirely their own doing.

Their efforts to intertwine the America’s Cup World Series (AC45s) and the America’s Cup (AC72s) to attract more sponsors/viewer, plus making it a requirement for entry to the AC that teams field at least one boat in the AC45 series, clearly joined the two at the hip. That was a specific intention of the protocol they wrote. It ensured all teams conducted themselves in a sporting manner throughout the cup cycle and couldn’t get away with stuff which attracted bad PR (or worse, cheating) in the ACWS and then just say “different series guys.”

Similarly, there HAVE been instances of teams being docked points for future round in the America’s Cup. In Valencia 2007 a One World team-member was found in possession of property of Team NZ property. They were docked a point for every stage of the round robin series (3 points in all) before they even started racing.

Just saying this since the writer took a position which ignored salient details which didn’t suit the story narrative. Coutts & Oracle didn’t attempt the “different series” defence line because they knew how ironic it would haven been to attempt that given they wrote the protocol that has now seen them pinged for clear cheating according to the Jury.”

And here’s a simple lament: “Oh please.

Yep.

*Here they are, the International Jury. Remember to “follow the money” if that makes any kind of sense.

David Tillett (Australia) Chairman
A lawyer in Australia, David has been an International Judge for over 20
years and was the Chairman of the ISAF Racing Rules Committee from
2000 until 2012. He is presently a member of the ISAF Council and ISAF
Constitution Committee. He has been a juror at the 31st, 32nd and 33rd
America’s Cups as well as an Umpire at the 28th and
29th America’s Cups. He has been a Jury Member at five Olympic Games, and
Chairman in 2004, 2008 and 2012.

John Doerr (Great Britain)
A graduate Mechanical Engineer specialising in project management
and management development for the petrochemical and construction
industries. John was a dinghy World Champion in 1978 and Olympic
trialist in the Finn class in 1980 and 1984. He has been an International
Judge since 1987 and an International Umpire since 1990. He is a past
Chairman of the ISAF Race Officials Committee and currently a member of the ISAF
Racing Rules and Race Officials Committees. John was Jury Chairman and Chief
Umpire for the 29th America’s Cup and a Jury Member for the 33rd America’s Cup. He
has served on the International Jury at the last five Olympic Games.

Josje Hofland (The Netherlands)
Josje has a ‘Doctoraal’ degree in English Literature and Linguistics. She
has been an International Judge since 1992 and was an International
Umpire between 1992 and 2000. She is a past Chairman of ISAF Judges
and Umpires sub-committees and past member of the Racing Rules and
Race Officials Committee. She was a Jury member
in the 29th and 33rd America’s Cup. For the 29th America’s Cup she filled the role of
Chief Umpire in the Challenger Finals and Deputy Chief Umpire in the America’s Cup
Match. Josje has also been a member of the Jury in four Olympic Games.

Graham McKenzie (New Zealand)
Graham is a Barrister at Law and a Solicitor in New Zealand and has
extensive experience as a commercial lawyer. He holds a Masters of
Law degree from Warwick University, England and is a Notary Public. He
is a Director of companies listed on the stock exchange and unlisted
companies in the hotel, aviation and finance sector businesses. Graham
is a competing sailor in keelboats. He is a member of the ISAF
Constitution Committee. He was a member of the combined Jury and Arbitration
Panel for the 32nd America’s Cup & and member of the Jury for the 33rd America’s
Cup.

Bryan Willis (Great Britain but lives in Malaysia)
A Marine Arbitrator and a past Magistrate (judge) in the lower criminal
court in Great Britain, Bryan has been an International Umpire, and an
International judge since 1976. He was an integral member of the ISAF
Racing Rules Committee for 20 years, and has chaired the Race
Officials Committee and Race Management sub-committees. Bryan
was a Jury member and Chief Umpire in the 28th America’s Cup, Chairman of the
Jury and Chief Umpire in the 30th and 31st America’s Cups, Chairman of the
combined Jury and Arbitration Panel for the 32nd America’s Cup and member of the
Jury for the 33rd America’s Cup. He was a Jury member for the 1992 and 1996
Olympic Games and Jury Chairman of the 2000 Olympic Games and three Volvo
Ocean Races.

Cheeky Devils! EMIRATES TEAM NEW ZEALAND (ETNZ) Allows Omega Watch to Advertise “AMERICA”S CUP? NOT FOR LONG”

Friday, August 23rd, 2013

Can you believe this? This new 17-foot-tall ad from New Zealand sponsor Omega at the foot of Sansome Street is all:

“AMERICA”S CUP? NOT FOR LONG”

See? With a certified lead-free forward king post and everything:

Click to expand

So Omega is mocking Americah in Americah?

Well I never.

This is what I could find from the Google, not that you could easily find it, I’m srsly:

“AMERICA’S CUP? NOT FOR LONG. OMEGA proudly supports Emirates Team New Zealand in its campaign to re-claim sailing’s greatest trophy, the America’s Cup…”

I tell you, if my Icebreaker merino wool watch cap hadn’t cost so very very much, I’d burn it!

News from Inside the America’s Cup: SFGov “is very unhappy with the promised financial bonanza being anything but.”

Friday, July 5th, 2013

So let’s hear from America’s Cup 2013 Safety Committee member Jim Farmer, QC [Her Majesty's Counsel learned* in the law]:

The City of San Francisco is very unhappy with the promised financial bonanza being anything but.”

Heretofore, everything that could have gone wrong with the 2013 America’s Cup has gone wrong. All we can do now is hope that no one else dies for the sake of Larry Ellison’s ego.

Oh well.

And is this America’s Cup going to be the last big thing Larry Ellison does before he dies?

Oh well.

So there’s this – it’s the kind of thing called Harsh Reality Time:

“Much of the vision, it is now apparent, has turned to custard.  Larry Ellison’s prediction that there would be a dozen or more challengers (up to 15 perhaps) looks absurd with only 3 challengers making it to the start line and one of them not yet ready to race.   The City of San Francisco is very unhappy with the promised financial bonanza being anything but.  The tragic death of Andrew Simpson when the first (and so far only) Artemis boat disintegrated as it collapsed has cast a pall over the Event from which even the spectacular speed of these boats is unlikely to clear away.

And there’s this:

“One has to hope most earnestly that there is no further disaster.  So far these boats have not yet raced in anger and that has to be the major concern.  Two boats, each sailing at over 40 knots and closing from opposing tacks at a mark at an effective combined speed of 80 knots, is not for the faint-hearted.  Getting crew down safely or out of the water from a boat that has capsized remains a serious challenge even for sailors who are well equipped, fit and trained to deal with that situation as best they can.  Fortunately, sanity prevailed with one of the Regatta Director’s safety recommendations being a prohibition on corporate guests sitting on the back of one of these racing machines.  How crazy was that idea in the first place?”

Oh, and there’s this:

“…it will be economics that will prevent the next edition of the Cup under Ellison’s control being a success.   Three challengers this time.  It is hard to see any of those challengers continuing with the same model of the Event next time.  Yes, there will be others who will be happy to do the A45 thing, as there were this time, but the question will be whether (billionaires aside) more than one or two will be able to go to the next stage – which is the America’s Cup after all.  And even the viability of the AC45 circuit must be uncertain.  The existing model of cities paying all the costs of each mini-event, including the cost of getting the 45s there, just didn’t work this time, with a number of planned events being cancelled because of lack of financial support.”

Anyway, the point is that Appointed Mayor and Willie Brown butt-boy Ed Lee knows that this venture is a big flop, but he’s afraid to say or do anything about it.

Oh well.

Monstrous Big Red, a ticking time bomb that went off a couple months ago:

*Pepe: “Wow, Papa Homer, you are so learn-ed.” Homer: “It’s pronounced “learned.’”

Here’s the July 4-11 Schedule for the America’s Cup, Here’s What We’re Getting for Our Tens of Millions of Dollars

Wednesday, June 26th, 2013

But first, the news. Here are your top seven stories when you search for news regarding this colossal failure:

  1. How Larry Ellison Is Destroying the America’s Cup - Bloomberg

    Jun 5, 2013 – The result is the sports equivalent of Apple’s Newton or Microsoft’s Bob: a disruptive, innovative, colossal failure. The America’s Cup, which 
  2. America’s Cup finals scaled back from original vision – San Jose 

     Aug 23, 2012 – In an interview this week at Marina Green, Troublé blamed theAmerica’s Cup Event Authority for failing to secure TV contracts early enough,
  3. Did an America’s Cup Sailor Drown Because His  - Slate Magazine

    May 9, 2013 – On the America’s Cup website, there is a description of the AC72, the new  It’s not clear if there was a structural failure that caused the crash 
  4. America’s Cup Team Feared Capsizing – WSJ.com

    May 10, 2013 – The team said doctors failed to revive him while in rescue boats and later  The America’s Cup, established in 1851 as a competition between 
  5. Organized Labor - America’s Cup Admits Failure to Pay Prevailing 

    Organizers for the America’s Cup Yacht races were called to a special hearing by the Board of Supervisors in March to explain a failure by some contractors 

And now, on with the show:

“Please check below for the schedule for the first week of the America’s Cup Summer of Racing. Changes and updates will be made to this schedule as necessary.

July 4 – Opening Day

12:00 America’s Cup Park officially opens to the public for the first time
13:30-16:45 AC72s at mooring off Promenade at Piers 27/29
14:00-14:30 Poster signing session at Presentation Stage with America’s Cup Teams
14:15 America’s Cup Pavilion open for ticketed entry
15:00-16:30 Opening Ceremony at America’s Cup Pavilion
16:45 AC72 depart mooring
19:00 America’s Cup Park closes

July 5 – Race Day (Fleet Race / Parade)
10:00 America’s Cup Park opens
10:00-11:00 AC72s at America’s Cup Park mooring
10:15 Marching band from Plaza to Presentation Stage
10:45-11:15 Dock Out Show (including full sailing teams at Presentation Stage)
11:15-12:00 AC72s depart for Boat Parade from Pier 27 to Marina Green
12:15-13:15 AC72 racing, live on big screens, with commentary
14:00-14:30 Poster signing session with America’s Cup Teams
15:00 -17:30 Live Music – New Diplomat and The 500s
19:00 America’s Cup Park closes

July 6 – ‘Special Event Day’
12:00 America’s Cup Park opens
13:30-14:30 “AC Talk Show” with Andy Green and Tucker Thompson plus teams @ AC Pavilion
14:30-15:00 America’s Cup Trophy – San Francisco Fan Photo Opportunity
15:00-15:30 Poster signing
15:30-17:30 Live Music – Nova Albion and Bonnie & the Bang Bang
19:00 America’s Cup Park closes

July 7 – Race Day
10:00 America’s Cup Park Opens
10:00-11:15 AC72s on moorings
10:15 Marching band to Presentation Stage
10:45-11:15 Dock Out Show
12:00-13:00 “AC Show” at America’s Cup Pavilion, with live commentary of Emirates Team New Zealand vs. Luna Rossa race starting at 12:15
14:00-14:30 Poster signing session
15:00-17:00 Live Music– Jazz Mafia
19:00 America’s Cup Park closes

July 8 – ‘Reserve Day’
12:00 America’s Cup Park Opens
12:30 “Kids World” America’s Cup Park tour starts
12:30-13:00 America’s Cup History Film, AC Pavilion
13:30-14:00 What’s Inside – The Science of Sailing, AC Pavilion
14:30-15:00 America’s Cup Movie of the Day – 1
15:30-16:00 America’s Cup Special Film, AC Pavilion
16:30-17:30 America’s Cup Movie of the Day – 2
19:00 America’s Cup Park closes

July 9 – Race Day
10:00 AC Park opens to the public
10:30 “Kids World” AC Park Tour starts
12:00 -13:15 “AC Magazine Show” at AC Pavilion with Team representatives
14:00 -14:30 Poster signing session
15:00 -16:00 America’s Cup Discovered
19:00 America’s Cup Park closes

July 10 – ‘Reserve Day’
12:00 AC Park Opens
12:30 “Kids World” AC Park Tour starts
12:30-13:00 AC History Film, AC Pavilion
13:30-14:00 What’s Inside – Science of Sailing, AC Pavilion
14:30-15:00 AC Movie of the Day -1
15:30-16:00 AC Special Film, AC Pavilion
16:30-17:30 AC Movie of the Day – 2
19:00 AC Park closes

July 11 – Race Day
10:00 America’s Cup Park opens
10:30 “Kids World” America’s Cup Park Tour starts
12:00-13:15 “AC Magazine Show” at AC Pavilion with team representatives
14:00-14:30 Poster signing session
15:00-16:00 America’s Cup Discovered
19:00 America’s Cup Park closes

Here’s an Explanation of How the America’s Cup Rules are Being Changed, In The Name of Safety, to Benefit Larry Ellison

Tuesday, June 25th, 2013

“OR can quite legitimately claim that they need this change to improve the safety of their boat to acceptable levels. ETNZ/LR can quite legitimately claim that the issue is created by design choices.”

When you’re foiling a catamaran, you’re generating lift just like an airplane. The Emirates Team New Zealand yacht generates more lift with the forward element than the rear. The Oracle Racing Larry Ellison yacht does so as well but it gets a bit more lift from the rear compared with ETNZ.

So, ETNZ is more like a regular airplane with  a small tail and OR is more like this goofy thing:

Mandating a bigger tail for all comers in the name of safety is a way for the Larry Ellison America’s Cup people to gain an advantage for Larry Ellison and/or Artemis Racing, the team with the other failed design,

Let’s hear from Hump101, a poster at Sailing Anarchy:

“ETNZ have a boat that is almost entirely supported on its single main foil. The rudder provides very little lift, just control forces, which are relatively small. As speed changes, lift changes. The main foil is correspondingly adjusted, as this is allowed, so the lift remains as  required. The lift on the rudder changes, but since this force is relatively small, the change in attitude on the boat is not problematic, and the local effects of free surface and small size provide a natural limit to motions. When it goes wrong, the boat will pivot about its main foil, potentially creating a high bow down pitch angle, so they’ve included sufficient buoyancy in the bows to cope.

OR have a boat where the lift is shared between the main foil and the rudder. The amount of lift provided by the rudder is still a small proportion of the total, but the rudder lift force is large compared to the rudder control force. As speed changes, lift changes. The main foil is correspondingly adjusted, but the rudder isn’t. The change in force on the rudder is significant, and affects the attitude of the boat. A small rudder foil that is required to provide a lot of lift can only do so with a large angle of attack, so with a fixed angle, a large change in trim of the boat is required, hence poor control. When it goes wrong, the boat pivots about the rudder foil, and hence a reduced bow down pitch angle, and hence the boat can have lower volume bows to allow recovery.

I’m sure both teams have simulated both approaches. ETNZ decided that they would go for the former, at a price of bigger main foil, lower righting moment, and more aero drag, so they have better control over a wide range of speeds for a given rudder setting. OR decided on the latter as it provides a lower drag solution, but for a smaller range of speeds for a given rudder setting. Boat 1 was an extreme example of this, but boat 2 is less extreme.

However, OR have found that the range of speeds over which they have good control is too small using the maximum size of rudder foil allowed. Hence, when they are running in the narrow speed range, they look good, but as soon as this is not the case, they have large pitch angles. Using a larger rudder foil requires less boat trim to generate the change in force, and hence better control.

The problem OR face is if they were to move the main foils further aft and increase their size, they would then have a boat which, if it goes wrong, will not have enough buoyancy in the bow to recover from the large pitch angle that would occur with the bigger main foil. A potentially dangerous solution, and rebuilding the hulls is probably not feasible, since even if they had the time, the added weight is more than their program has in the bank. They aren’t allowed new hulls. Furthermore, they have made corresponding design choices with their wing that also suggest the expectation of a narrow speed range, and moving to a higher drag foil solution would present them with power issues.

I suspect that OR may have been using a larger rudder foil recently to achieve the improvements we’ve been seeing, and consequently they already know that operating with class legal rudder foils is not a safe option for them, since if they set up the small rudder foils for lighter winds, and the winds increase during a race, they will have an unacceptably high probability of pitchpoling.

As such, the move to increase allowed rudder foil size and control is a real issue for OR, as without it they will have to choose between pulling out of certain races when conditions change, or risking the boat and crew by continuing. ETNZ and LR, on the other hand, don’t have this issue, and in fact increasing the rudder foil size on their boats would not only increase drag, but also create control problems due to the size of the control force generated becoming too large. 

Hence the current dichotomy  OR can quite legitimately claim that they need this change to improve the safety of their boat to acceptable levels. ETNZ/LR can quite legitimately claim that the issue is created by design choices. Since the AC is not just a design and sailing competition, but a design, sailing, and legal competition, we’ll have to wait and see who has the best overall package.

And then, in response to a question about how the engineer knows all this:

“Because when the OR boat is in the water, its static waterline, combined with its visible hullform when on a crane, shows that the vessel CoG is well aft of the main foil location. On the ETNZ boat, this is not the case. Their main foil is about where the CoG appears to be (actually slightly forward, but not by much).

As such, the resulting moment generated by the offset between main lifting foil vector and sum of sailing force vector on OR requires the rudder foil to provide a significant lifting force, plus also to provide the dynamic positive and negative control force, whilst on ETNZ the rudder foil provide very little lift force, just the control force element.”

So that’s why this is a lot of horseshit and this could be in the near future of this attempt at an America’s Cup yachting match.

Uh Oh: “Substantially Lower” Prices for Some Tickets for the Exceedingly Unpopular America’s Cup Yacht Match

Thursday, June 13th, 2013

Crowd estimates for some days of our so-called “Summer of Racing” have gone down more than two orders of magnitude from just last year.

Yes, that means that the estimates are now at less than 1% of  the 500,000 per day that ineffectual San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee was promising  all the way back in 2012.

Here’s the news:

“We have decided to substantially lower our charter prices to benefit spectators who are seeking a unique and thrilling viewing experience of the races from prime positioning on the perimeter of the America’s Cup race course,” said Captain Stephan Sowash.

Of course most people won’t pay a dime to watch this unpopular “gentlemen’s match” It may or may not be broadcast on free TV for a zero or negative(!) broadcast fee. And some tickets have already been refunded (which didn’t cost the Larry Ellison people  too much because how many people in the world would actually pay, really?)

All the deets:

America’s Cup 2013 Ticket Prices Reduced for Corporate Charter and Individuals on Official Stake Boat Odyssey with Sailing Fearless

San Francisco, CA (PRWEB) June 12, 2013

Sailing Fearless, charter provider on an official America’s Cup stake boat in San Francisco, is pleased to announce a significant price reduction to its charter pricing for the On-The-Water Viewing Experience. Corporate charters and individual ticket prices on Odyssey, a 65 foot tri-level luxury yacht, have been reduced as much as 20% to make America’s Cup even more accessible for the public to watch the competition from the premier location on the perimeter of the race course.

“With the announcement of the schedule changes from America’s Cup on June 7th, we have decided to substantially lower our charter prices to benefit spectators who are seeking a unique and thrilling viewing experience of the races from prime positioning on the perimeter of the race course” said Captain Stephan Sowash.

As an official stake boat, Odyssey will depart from Emeryville marina to form part of the perimeter of the race course offering premium viewing of the AC72 catamarans with an unobstructed view of the competition. Odyssey offers a live feed and commentary via two HDTV’s inside the cabin, a spacious main salon with wet bar and large seating area, outdoor and indoor seating with protection from the weather, and a 360 degree view of the bay. With “gyro-controlled hydraulic stabilizers”, the yacht provides extreme stability regardless of sea conditions.

“Your experience aboard Odyssey will be the best possible when it comes to capturing the excitement of the world’s greatest yacht races. This is the closest to the action you will get within the comfort, style, and luxury of a beautiful motor yacht,” said Captain Stephan Sowash.

America’s Cup charter schedule on Odyssey is as follows:

· Louis Vuitton Cup Finals | August 17th – 30th

The Louis Vuitton Cup finals are an exciting match-up of challengers in which the winner goes on to compete against the defending America’s Cup champion Oracle Team USA.

· Red Bull Youth America’s Cup | September 1st – 4th

Red Bull Youth America’s Cup features young, talented sailors aged 19 to 24 comprised of six sailors on various national teams. This is an opportunity to see the next America’s Cup generation of competitors.

· Super Yacht Regatta | September 9th, 11th and 13th

Participating in their own regatta, these magnificent super yachts will astonish as they race for the very first time in this inaugural event.

· America’s Cup Finals | September 7th – 20th

For the first time since 1851, America’s Cup is being held in picturesque San Francisco and may not be back for years to come. A great match-up between defender Oracle Team USA and the winner of the Louis Vuitton Cup Finals.

Coast Guard certified for 40 passengers, Odyssey will provide chartering from 11:30 am – 4 pm for the Louis Vuitton and America’s Cup Finals and 10:00 am – 3:00 pm for the Red Bull Youth Cup and Super Yacht Regatta with catering provided by one of San Francisco’s finest restaurants Arlequin – of the Absinthe Restaurant Group. A fully staffed professional crew will be attentive to all guests’ needs.

For more information about booking a Corporate Charter or individual tickets with Odyssey visit http://www.sailingfearless.com.

About Sailing Fearless

Sailing Fearless is a San Francisco based charter company owned and operated by Captain Stephan Sowash. With over 30 years experience on the water, Captain Stephan offers America’s Cup Charters and Dinner Cruises on a luxurious 65 foot tri-deck Hatteras yacht U.S Coast Guard certified for 40 passengers. He also Captains a 30 foot Cherubini Hunter for more intimate charters on his 6 passenger sailboat. For further information, please visit Sailing Fearless’s website at http://www.sailingfearless.com.

Read more at http://www.onenewspage.com/n/Press+Releases/74vw268ao/America’s-Cup-Tickets-Reduced-up-to-20-for.htm#51lQOdF6AXm8V7J0.99

Check Out How Big the Overly Large Wingsails of Larry Ellison’s Failed America’s Cup are – Like in Relation to a Jetliner

Wednesday, June 5th, 2013

This is pretty much to scale, believe it* or not.

Click to expand

And actually, the real wing of this KC-10 jet, which would be considered the size of a medium-big jetliner these days, is smaller than what you’ll find on Craaaaaazy Larry Ellison’s AC72 America’s Cup yachts.

And actually, Craaaaaazy Larry Ellison’s AC72 America’s Cup yachts have wings bigger those found on monstrous Boeing 747′s, your prototypical jumbo jets.

Hey Larry! Why don’t we use smaller wings on days when the wind is blowing a lot? Oh, you said no, Larry? OK fine.

But hey Larry! Why don’t we allow control devices like, IDK, spoilers, you know, the way other similar-sized wings have? Oh, you said no, Larry? OK fine.

But hey Larry! Why don’t we have a spoiler system for use in emergency situations, like NASCAR has, you know, since your people felt the need to promote this under-regulated “sport” as “NASCAR ON THE WATER?”

Oh, you said no, Larry? OK fine.

But you WILL take eight figures from the taxpayers of San Francisco in order to fund your ego-gratification race?

Well then, On With The Show.

*Your DC-10, MD-10, KC10 type aircraft were famous for having big, big tailplanes, back in the day, the likes of which you can see in this photo, the horizontal stabilizer you can see at the back. Which was fine, but it wasn’t efficient because  tailplanes don’t really lift anything. So, McDonnell-Douglas engineers made the updated model, the MD-11, with a smaller tailplane. And they also strengthened the landing gear to deal with the lengthened body. All these things led to a more efficient but harder-to-handle aircraft. So in tough landing situations things head south in a hurry and, instead of the landing gear collapsing, you’ll break a wing off and roll over. (See below.) These days, this is mostly a problem for FedEx pilots and it will continue to be for the foreseeable future. Godspeed, FedEx pilots. 

Oh, and this wasn’t the only safety issue with this unsuccessful and relatively rare a/c.

  • On July 31, 1997 FedEx Flight 14, MD-11 N611FE, crashed during a landing at Newark Liberty International Airport, New Jersey. The aircraft flipped onto its back and subsequently burned, following a landing attempt from an unstabilized flare.
  • On August 22, 1999 China Airlines Flight 642, an MD-11 operated by subsidiary Mandarin Airlines, crashed while landing at Hong Kong airport during a typhoon that exceeded the plane’s crosswind specifications, also flipping onto its back and burning. Three passengers were killed.
  • On March 23, 2009 FedEx Express Flight 80, N526FE, crashed at Narita International Airport, Japan while landing in windy conditions. Airport surveillance video showed the aircraft becoming airborne again after the first touch-down, then impacting nose-first the second time and turning onto its left side, erupting into flames; the impact flipped the aircraft upside down. The aircraft finally came to rest some distance left of the runway. The two flight crew members were killed.

WTF? America’s Cup 2013 Workers STILL Haven’t Been Paid? Big Skeleton Protest at City Hall

Friday, May 31st, 2013

Now when I say big skeleton protest, I’m talking about a big skeleton on the steps of City Hall.

The ongoing protest itself is small, with just three dudes when I passed by.

“AMERICA”S CUP” and “SHAME ON THEM”

Click to expand

I can’t believe how fucked up Larry Ellison’s America’s Cup has become.

If I were Larry Ellison, I’d have my people pay the carpenters and whomever and then be done with this.

Apparently, “most” of the carpenters came up from Southern California?

And “most” of the carpentry is done already anyway.

Oh well.

Or maybe the America’s Cup people only committed to “endeavoring” to pay their workers?

Maybe it’s something like that…

PR Misstep from the America’s Cup People: Comparing Andrew Simpson Death to Famous Manslaughter Case

Tuesday, May 28th, 2013

IMO, this recent statement from Larry Ellison Person Stephan Barclay* is a misstep, but you make the call.

Check it:

“For example, following the death of Ayrton Senna in 1994, a number of measures were introduced, such as better cockpit protection for the drivers. Grooved tires were introduced in 1998 instead of racing slick tires to reduce cornering speed. Safety measures continued to be introduced into the 21st century, with a number of circuits having their configuration changed to improve driver safety.”

All right, I can understand why the Larry Ellison PR people want to compare America’s Cup 2013 to a popular sport like F1 car racing. Right? Because broadcasters actually pay money for the rights to broadcast F1, you dig. (Compare this with Larry Ellison’s America’s Cup, which needed mucho begging of NBC to agree to broadcast some of the matches for free.)

But mentioning Ayrton Senna is not a good move IMO because, from the beginning, it was investigated as a manslaughter case and, in the end, was determined to be a case of manslaughter.

Read all about it.

And, you know, people said the same things about Senna’s sport and Simpson’s sport, about how they are  inherently dangerous and whatnot. But that didn’t stop a manslaughter investigation in Senna’s case, now did it?

So where’s our manslaughter investigation?

Oh, just a “review” and let’s carry on? OK fine…

*Or, as CW Nevius spells it, repeatedly, in the pages of the San Francisco Chronicle, Stephen “Barkley.” Hey Neve! How’s that  new paywall doing for you? Oh, that badly, huh? Miss all those commenters already? Sure you do!