Posts Tagged ‘agu’

NASA and American Geophysical Union to Host a “NASA Social” Dec. 4th – 20 People Will Win Invites – Ooh, James Cameron!

Thursday, November 15th, 2012

You can’t win if you don’t play, so sign up before tomorrow to get a chance to win an invite to nerd out with NASA in the 415 on December 4th, 2012.

Deets below.

She’s already applied:

All right, see you there!

“NASA, American Geophysical Union Host NASA Social In San Francisco

WASHINGTON, Nov. 14, 2012  – NASA and the American Geophysical Union are inviting social media followers to a unique behind-the-scenes NASA Social on Tuesday, Dec. 4, in San Francisco. The event will bring 20 social media users together with some of the world’s best and brightest scientific minds at the world’s largest Earth and solar system science conference.

NASA Socials are in-person meetings with people who engage with the agency through Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and other social networks. Participants will get special access to parts of the AGU meeting and meet with NASA and other scientists presenting research on Earth’s climate, deep ocean exploration and the latest findings from Mars. Additionally, guests will sit in on a press conference, attend a panel on deep ocean exploration with film-maker James Cameron and a NASA astrobiologist, explore the expansive exhibit hall, and meet fellow science enthusiasts who are active on social media.

Registration is open from noon EST Wednesday, Nov. 14, to 5 p.m. Friday, Nov. 16. NASA and the AGU will select 20 participants at random from Web registrants. Additional applicants will be placed on a waiting list. Because of space limitations, those selected will not be permitted to bring a guest. Each participant must be age 18 or older. For more NASA Social and sign up information, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/social

To join and track the conversation online during the NASA Socials, follow the hashtags #NASASocial and #AGU12.

The AGU Fall Meeting attracts as many as 20,000 attendees and offers a platform for scientists to present their most cutting-edge work. For more information on the meeting, visit:

http://fallmeeting.agu.org/2012

SOURCE  NASA

Web Site: http://www.nasa.gov

Lockheed Martin Sun Scientist Dr. Alan M. Title Honored With 2011 American Geophysical Union Medal in San Francisco

Friday, December 9th, 2011

The big 2011 AGU convention is winding down in San Francisco with news of a bay area physicist winning the big award.

Congratulations Dr. Alan M. Title!

Click to expand

All the deets:

“Lockheed Martin Physicist Honored With 2011 American Geophysical Union John Adam Fleming Medal

PALO ALTO, Calif., Dec. 8, 2011  – Dr. Alan M. Title, physicist at the Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) Space Systems Advanced Technology Center (ATC) in Palo Alto, was honored last evening with the 2011 John Adam Fleming Medal, at a ceremony at the 2011 Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) in San Francisco. The Fleming Medal is awarded not more than once annually to an individual “for original research and technical leadership in geomagnetism, atmospheric electricity, aeronomy, space physics, and related sciences.”

Established in 1960, the Fleming Medal is named in honor of John Adam Fleming, who made important contributions to the establishment of magnetic standards and measurements. Fleming served as AGU officer in a number of positions, including: secretary of the Terrestrial Magnetism and Atmospheric Electricity section (1920-1929), Union General Secretary (1925-1947), and honorary president (1947-1956). John Adam Fleming was associated with the science of geomagnetism throughout his career, and with the American Geophysical Union from its founding until his death.

As a scientist, Alan Title studies the Sun.  His primary research interest is the generation, distribution, and effects of the solar magnetic field throughout the Sun’s interior and outer atmosphere. Using spectral imaging techniques we now can map both horizontal and vertical flows in the solar interior and surface. Flow maps have shown among other things how the solar interior rotates as a function of radius. This profile is essential for any understanding of interior magnetic field generation – dynamo action. Magnetic fields can be measured in the photosphere and inferred in the interior and outer atmosphere. Using these techniques it has been discovered that magnetic field emerges everywhere on the solar surface at a rate sufficient to completely replace the fields outside of active regions in less than a day, and even active region fields are replace in at most a few weeks. The detailed mechanisms by which magnetic energy is released is currently the focus of his research. At present, he has 169 articles in refereed journals. Building on accumulated knowledge, through observation and experimentation, he asks new questions of the Sun and formulates hypotheses on how it might work.

As an engineer, Alan Title designs, develops, builds, and flies new instruments that will gather the data necessary to test those hypotheses. He led the development of tunable bandpass filters for space-based solar observations, a version of which is currently operating on the JAXA/ISAS Hinode spacecraft.  He also invented a tunable variation of the Michelson Interferometer that has been employed on the SOHO spacecraft, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the Global Oscillations Network Group of the National Solar Observatory as well as other ground-based systems.

Extraordinarily dedicated to advancing public awareness of science, Dr. Title has supported activities at the Tech Museum, Chabot Observatory, Boston Museum of Science, the National Air and Space Museum, and the Hayden Planetarium. In addition, his educational outreach funding has supported a yearly summer program for Stanford undergraduates, and the Stanford Hass Center activities that develop science programs for K-12 classrooms. And for two decades, promising students from the Palo Alto High School District have come to work in his laboratory.

Ever more deets, after the jump

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