Posts Tagged ‘Airbnb’

Snoop Dog + Joe Montana + Willie Brown + MC Hammer + Ronnie Lott + Diana Nyad + Airbnb = “No Guns Allowed” Campaign

Thursday, May 29th, 2014

Snoop Youth Football League? News to me.

Plus, an “auction of Snoop Dogg’s paintings?”

Tonight’s soiree should be quite an event.

All the deets:

“MEDIA ADVISORY: SNOOP DOGG, JOE MONTANA, RON CONWAY, DR. ROBERT “BIKO” BAKER & MORE COME TOGETHER TO DISCUSS GUN VIOLENCE

Leaders from Tech, Music, Sports, and Politics Support “No Guns Allowed”

Program at SF Press Conference on May 29

Special Guests Include Mayor Willie Brown, MC Hammer, Hall-of-Famer Ronnie Lott, Swimmer Diana Nyad and more 

San Francisco, CA - May 28, 2014 - Entertainment icon Snoop Dogg, NFL Hall-of-Famer Joe Montana, sf.citi founder Ron Conway and Executive Director, League of Young Voters Education Fund, Dr. Robert “Biko” Baker, will be the featured hosts at a May 29th benefit to raise money and awareness of the “No Guns Allowed” campaign. Other special guests to attend include former San Francisco Mayor Willie Brown, recording artist MC Hammer, Hall-of-Famer Ronnie Lott, swimmer Diana Nyad, and more.

The evening will be kicked off by a press conference discussing gun violence solutions, followed by a live auction of Snoop Dogg’s paintings and other exclusive items to benefit both the “No Guns Allowed” initiative and the Snoop Youth Football League.”

Ever more deets, after the jump

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The Empire Strikes Back: Board President David Chiu’s AirBNB Legalization Proposal Gets Opposed by the SFAA, Tenant’s Groups

Monday, April 28th, 2014

A fresh press release:

“NEWS RELEASE: SAN FRANCISCO CITYWIDE COALITION SAYS NO TO PROPOSED CHIU LEGISLATION - Board of Supervisors trying to convert residential housing to short-term rentals

Press conference Tuesday April 29, 2014 Steps of City Hall at 10:00 am

San Francisco — Organizations representing usually divergent interests ranging from tenants to landlords, and from hotel workers to the hospitality industry have joined forces with neighborhood and homeowner associations to oppose legislation introduced by Supervisor David Chiu to legalize the short term rentals of residential property throughout San Francisco.

“In the face of an unprecedented housing crisis, Supervisor Chiu’s legislation to legalize the short term rentals of residential property will only exacerbate the housing crisis. This practice is detrimental to our rent-controlled housing stock”, said Janan New, Executive Director of the San Francisco Apartment Association.

“Our studies have shown that with over 10,000 units of housing being rented out over Airbnb, HomeAway and other websites this practice is having a negative impact on hotel workers and San Francisco’s hospitality industry”, said Mike Casey, President of UNITE HERE Local 2.

“The proposed legislation would rezone the entire city from residential zoning to commercial zoning in one fell swoop. We hear complaints from almost every neighborhood about the detrimental effects of short term rentals on the quality of life of tenants and residents”, said John Bardis, former President of the Coalition for San Francisco Neighborhoods and former San Francisco Supervisor.

“Supervisors Chiu’s legislation would repeal hard won controls on Single Resident Occupancy housing, threatens current affordable housing provisions for over 30,000 permanently affordable units, would transform newly approved “in-law units” into high priced motel rooms and make “below market rate” units lifetime luxury hotels. It is the single biggest threat to affordable housing ever proposed by a San Francisco Supervisor” stated longtime affordable housing advocate Calvin Welch.

“Airbnb and other hosting platforms owe the City millions of dollars in unpaid hotel taxes. It is high time that the City collect these taxes which pay for the arts and vital city services and programs. The proposed legislation does not clearly hold Airbnb and similar organizations responsible for collecting and remitting the hotel tax”, said former Supervisor Aaron Peskin.

All of these organizations are calling for Supervisor Chiu to withdraw his legislation at a press conference on Tuesday April 29 on the steps of City Hall at 10:00 am.”

Dennis Herrera Throws Down: Sues Short-Term Rental Scofflaws for Illegal Conversions, Unlawful Business Practices – Ellis Act, Baby!

Wednesday, April 23rd, 2014

[UPDATE: Direct link here and the full press kit with complaint here.]

City Attorney Dennis Herrera, The Happy Warrior:

“Herrera sues short-term rental scofflaws for illegal conversions, unlawful business practices

Two cases target ‘egregious offenders’—both involving Ellis Act evictions of disabled tenants to illegally convert residential apartments into tourist lodging

SAN FRANCISCO (April 23, 2014) — City Attorney Dennis Herrera today filed two separate lawsuits against short-term rental scofflaws for illegally converting residential apartments into commercial tourist lodging, which the property owners then marketed through such online platforms as Airbnb, Homeway.com and VRBO.com.  In both cases, the defendants had previously evicted long-term residents from their apartments under the Ellis Act, a state law that allows landlords to evict tenants and withdraw their properties from the residential rental market.  Two of the evicted tenants were disabled, according to San Francisco Superior Court and Rent Board records cited in today’s pleadings.

“In the midst of a housing crisis of historic proportions, illegal short-term rental conversions of our scarce residential housing stock risks becoming a major contributing factor,” said Herrera.  “The cases I’ve filed today target two egregious offenders.  These defendants didn’t just flout state and local law to conduct their illegal businesses, they evicted disabled tenants in order to do so.  Today’s cases are the first among several housing-related matters under investigation by my office, and we intend to crack down hard on unlawful conduct that’s exacerbating—and in many cases profiting from—San Francisco’s alarming lack of affordable housing.  I’m grateful to the city departments, including the San Francisco Planning Department, and community advocates who have worked with my office to help us pursue these kinds of scofflaws.  And I encourage tenants and neighbors to report housing-related wrongdoing online to my office through our Up2Code.org website or the Up2Code app, or by calling our Code Enforcement Hotline at (415) 554-3977.”

Herrera’s complaints filed in San Francisco Superior Court this morning detail pervasive violations of the city Planning Code and state Unfair Competition Law at three addresses: 3073-3075 Clay Street, owned by defendants Darren and Valerie Lee; and 734 and 790 Bay Street, which is owned or managed by defendants Lev, Tamara and Tatyana Yurovsky.  If successful, the litigation could result in permanent court-ordered injunctions; civil penalties of up to $200 per day for Planning Code violations; up to $2,500 for each unlawful business act; disgorgement of illegally obtained profits; and attorneys’ fees.  Though the Ellis Act itself does not preclude the commercial use of properties for tourists where long-term tenants have previously been evicted, Herrera’s litigation emphasized longstanding city policy that tourist conversions of residential properties be aggressively policed “in order to protect the residents and to conserve the limited housing resources.”

According to one of Herrera’s civil actions, defendants Darren and Valerie Lee purchased 3073-3075 Clay Street in 2004, and invoked the Ellis Act in 2005 to evict their tenants from both of the property’s residential units.  One of the evicted tenants was disabled.  Evidence presented in the complaint found that the Lees have marketed 3075 Clay Street, a four-bedroom, three-bathroom property, for tourist lodging on such vacation websites such as Homeaway.com and VRBO.com since 2009, describing it as an “exquisitely renovated home, in prime Pacific Heights.”  The Lees charged their guests between $395 and $595 per night for a minimum stay of three nights.  But in doing so, the owners flouted the city’s required conditional use authorization process—depriving neighbors and city planners of their role to first determine whether the conversion is necessary or desirable; compatible with the neighborhood; detrimental to the City’s housing stock; or consistent with the city’s Planning Code or Planning Department’s General Plan.  According to Herrera’s complaint, San Francisco’s Planning Department repeatedly cited the Lees for their illegal use of the property for commercial tourist lodging, even collecting penalties of as much $250 per day for violations.  The Lees—who at one point assured Planning Department officials that their illegal conduct had stopped—then defiantly resumed marketing and renting their property to tourists.  In 3073 Clay Street, the Lees evicted a disabled tenant who had lived in the unit for more than ten years and, until evicted, was paying $1,087 per month.  By invoking the Ellis Act, the Lees were legally restricted until August 25, 2011, from re-renting the unit at market rate.  But evidence presented in Herrera’s action shows that the Lees admitted to the Planning Department that they had, in fact, re-rented 3073 Clay Street and charged their new residential tenants between $5,000-$7,038 per month.

Herrera’s other civil complaint against Lev, Tamara and Tatyana Yurovsky notes that they, too, used the Ellis Act to evict long-term residential tenants — including one who was disabled — from one of their properties, at 734 Bay Street.  Together with a residential unit at another of their properties owned by Lev and Tatyana and managed by Tamara, at 790 Bay Street, the Yurovskys illegally converted their apartments into tourist use beginning in 2010.  They marketed the rentals to tourists on Airbnb.com and “greatsfvacation.com” for rates of between $165 and $320 per night, with three-night minimum stays.  Though the Yurovsky defendants boasted on social media that they had hosted several hundred tourists, according to evidence detailed in the complaint, they too flouted the city’s conditional use authorization process, violating the San Francisco Planning Code and state law.

The cases are: City and County of San Francisco and People of the State of California v. Darren Lee et al., San Francisco Superior Court No. 538857; and City and County of San Francisco and People of the State of California v. Tamara Yurovsky et al., San Francisco Superior Court No. 538854.  Additional documentation from the case is available on the City Attorney’s website at:http://www.sfcityattorney.org/.

OMG, Airbnb is Having a Sale – Airbnb Virgins Can Now Get One Night Free

Monday, January 13th, 2014

Or in other words:

“Book your first trip between January 13 – 17 for travel by March 31, and one night of your stay of at least two nights is on us (value up to $300).”

All the deets:

“Airbnb offers one night’s stay to all qualifying guests worldwide

Declares 2014 the “Year of the Yurt” and shares top trending destinations

SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 13, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — Airbnb, the world’s leading community-driven hospitality company, today introduced a new offer to cover one night of travel for qualifying guests (details available at www.airbnb.com/onenight). First-time Airbnb guests who book a trip between January 13-17 for travel by March 31, for stays of at least two days, will receive a one night discount (up to $300) on their trip. With the start of the new year, Airbnb also shared the top trending destinations for 2014 – with Andorra grabbing the top spot.

“Every year people resolve to travel more, this year Airbnb wants to make that dream a reality for people all over the world,” said Amy Curtis McIntyre, CMO, Airbnb. “In 2014 we’d like to help travelers everywhere embrace the adventure and stay at one of Airbnb’s 500,000 properties worldwide.”

Airbnb is home to some of the most diverse properties on the planet and 2014 is clearly the “Year of the Yurt.” Yurts are the most popular type of property on the site followed by Treehouses, Caves, Cabins, and Boats. Yurts should watch out for Tipis as they have seen the highest year over year growth in popularity.

Over 10 million guests have stayed on Airbnb throughout its five-year history. The peak night was on New Year’s Eve 2013 with over 250,000 guests; globally a guest on Airbnb checks in every 2 seconds.

Terms & Conditions:
The discount is valid only for guests who have never completed a booking on Airbnb. To receive the discount, you must book via the Airbnb website with promo code ONENIGHT and successfully complete Airbnb’s Verified ID process prior to booking. You must complete a booking (including host acceptance) using the code between 12:00am PST (California time) on January 13 and 11:59pm PST (California time) on January 17. The discount applies to one night of your stay up to a maximum of USD$300. The cost of “one night” is calculated by averaging the base reservation rate for each night, excluding taxes or other fees charged by your host, such as cleaning fees. Your stay must be at least two nights in length at the same listing, and must begin no later than 11:59pm PST (California time) on March 31, 2014. Limit one discount per new user. The offer is valid for a single use and is not transferrable to another user or redeemable for cash. If your booking later qualifies for a refund, the maximum refund you may receive is the amount you actually paid. The code cannot be used for bookings made through Airbnb’s mobile apps. The code may not be combined with another Airbnb coupon or discount code. Host payouts will not be affected by permissible guest use of the code. Airbnb reserves the right to any remedy, including denial of the discount or cancellation of your account or reservations, if fraud, tampering, violations of Airbnb’s Terms of Service or technical errors are suspected.

About Airbnb: Founded in August of 2008 and based in San Francisco, California, Airbnb is a trusted community marketplace for people to list, discover, and book unique accommodations around the world – online or from a mobile phone. Whether an apartment for a night, a castle for a week, or a villa for a month, Airbnb connects people to unique travel experiences, at any price point, in more than 35,000 cities and 192 countries. And with world-class customer service and a growing community of users, Airbnb is the easiest way for people to monetize their extra space and showcase it to an audience of millions.

SOURCE Airbnb”

It’s Not Hard to Spot AirBNB People When They Travel About the Western Addition – They Sort Of Stand Out

Thursday, November 14th, 2013

As here in The Projects waiting for the #5  Fulton:

Click to expand

I don’t think that these people ever would made it to the Western Addition without the recent appearance of “sharing economy.”

 

Heh: “Laws Don’t Exist Merely to Frustrate the Business Ambitions of Coastal Hipsters” – Writer Paul Carr vs. Uber Taxi

Thursday, October 25th, 2012

Via Monika Bauerlein comes this take-down of Uber Cab, and Lyft and Side Car and the like as well, I suppose.

A quote of a quote:

Matt Kochman… served as Uber’s founding general manager in New York before he left last year. Kochman left Uber to do consulting for transportation brands and startups, fed up with Uber’s irreverent attitude toward regulators. “Discounting the rules and regulations as a whole, just because you want to launch a product and you have a certain vision for things, that’s just irresponsible,” Kochman said.

Yep, pretty much.

The Mystery Machine – Living Rent-Free on the Streets of San Francisco

Tuesday, October 9th, 2012

Living in your van is even cheaper than using AirBNB:

Click to expand

Stupid Ashton Kutcher’s Stupid “Airbnb” Business Gets Pwned by NMA-TV: Animated Video Shows Downside of Apartment Share

Thursday, July 28th, 2011

[What, exactly, makes dreamy Ashton Kutcher "tech-savvy," anyway?]

Ouch. Airbnb (formerly Air Bed & Breakfast or something) is a San Francisco company associated with a famous incident what just happened to a San Francisco woman, so a Taiwan television outfit has seen fit to, once again, make a mockery of the 415.

Like this.

See? Airbnb is supposed to be better than craigslist if you want to rent out your apartment to a stranger for a few days and I suppose in some cases it is better than using CL.

Anyway, this is NMA-TV’s impression of craigslist:

And here’s the story, per NMA-TV:

Airbnb guests trash, burglarize apartment.

Web start-up Airbnb has benefited from the recent tech boom.It just raised $112 million US dollars from investors.It is now valued at $1 billion.

Although Craigslist allows those wishing to rent out their homes to travelers,it has a sketchy reputation. Airbnb is user friendly with a shiny interface.

However, a San Francisco woman recently rented out her apartment through Airbnb. She left her keys for her guests before going on a trip.

The guests ransacked her apartment,stole her stuff and left a huge mess. It took the woman 14 hours to get through to an Airbnb employee.”

And here’s the whole story from EJ, the San Francisco woman who rented out her apartment to the wrong people.

I don’t know how Airbnb can fix this kind of situation…