Posts Tagged ‘Americans’

Uh, Is Newly-Installed Supervisor London Breed Starting Race War 2013? Blacks vs. Asians – Competing for Govt. Housing

Tuesday, January 8th, 2013

Yeah, uh, here’s the highlight of District Five Supervisor London Breed’s stream-of consciousness interview with Andrew Dudley of Haighteration.

“What everyone talks about, as a gimmick, is “affordable housing.” I served on the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency Commission. We build tons of units of affordable housing, only to watch as people who live across the street from these units, who deserve to have access to these units, because of the lottery system and an organization — I’m not going to call any names, but they’re very organized, and they monopolize a lot of the affordable housing developments. So what happens to the person suffering through six roommates who wants to go to the next level? What happens to the people who want to come out of public housing and go to the next level? What happens to the people who suffered through, listening to the hammers and the construction and the lack of parking and everything else, why do they not have the ability to access this affordable housing? It’s because there’s one small group of people who control it, and they could care less who actually gets it.

That’s number one. Number two, you have some people being pushed out of affordable housing, and then you have others that are moving into that housing. And sometimes, the people who are in these different public housing developments — and I’m not discriminating against anyone, but sometimes they’re not even U.S. citizens — we are not doing enough to look at the people who are here now, and how we can help protect the folks who are here now and give them access to affordable housing. We’re so concerned about people coming from another state, or people coming from another country, making San Francisco attractive for everybody — except people who live here!

And I don’t mind people coming and moving here. I love diversity. I love meeting new people with new experiences. I love the different cultures — I think it’s great and makes San Francisco what it is — but we’re also continuing down a really dangerous path of wealthy and poor, and no in between. No place to go for the middle class. No place to go for the people who have stepped right out of poverty. No place. And the fact that I’m holding on for dear life, and I’m now the Supervisor — it’s really scary to me. We’ve got to look at all this affordable housing that we build, and how do we really give people opportunities. We get money from the federal government for housing, and they require a lottery system. But is it really diversity if one ethnic group monopolizes the lottery and gets all of the affordable units?”

Yowzer.

(So when Asians and Asian-Americans complain of being bullied by African Americans in San Francisco public housing, this is the nativist attitude* that they are referencing)

Does one ethnic group in get _all_ the affordable units in San Francisco? Really?

And I’ll have to say that somebody sure still sounds pissed over stuff like this: 

On it goes.

*The last time I’ve heard this issue discussed in the media was when former Mayor Willie Brown (apparently improperly) intervened in an individual case to get the only Asian / Asian-American family out of one particular PJ and into another PJ that already had Asian / Asian-Americans. They might have been the relatives of the woman who did his nails, something like that. This was in the 1990′s.

Gold Mountain Mural in North Beach is Gone, Long Gone, Owing to Graffiti Vandals – Why We Can’t Have Nice Things

Friday, March 9th, 2012

The news of this mural going away had escaped my attention the past couple of months.

Here’s what it looked like before….

…and here’s what it looks like now:

Click to expand

Here are your reading notes:

Gen Fujioka of the Chinatown Community Development Center is involved with promoting the horrible Central Subway to Nowhere.

Artist Ann Sherry is fortunate to get a five-figure commission for anything, so I’m not sure why she’s so perpetually cranky. 

It’s not smart to put up images of authority figures (you know, people in military of police uniforms) in a sort of wild part of town

I don’t know, maybe this was a bad idea from the start?

I don’t know, maybe San Francisco government has lots of bad ideas, you know, from the start?

What can we learn from this episode?

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen G. Breyer Graces U.C. Hastings – Another Interview From “Legally Speaking” Series

Thursday, November 17th, 2011

I’ll tell you, our UC Hastings Law School down in Civic Center has been en el fuego this past year or so, what with its new, new-school dean and whathaveyou.

For example, here’s yesterday’s joint, featuring United States Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer getting interviewd by UC Hastings Distinguished Professor David Faigman, an expert on constitutional theory:

Via James Block - click to expand

(And that comes on the heels of another Supreme Court Justice and the political debates they’ve had recently. It’s amazing, really.)

What were the topics? I have no idea. But Bob Egleko was there (with his pencil and notepad, since they don’t allow recordings), so check his report.

And I’ll be sure to upload video or link or whatever I can find in a week or two, pinky-swear.

“Legally Speaking: U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen G. Breyer
11/16/2011 from 2:30 PM to 4:00 PM
198 McAllister, Louis B Mayer Lounge

Legally Speaking is a series of probing interviews with prominent lawyers, judges and academics, co-produced by UC Hastings and California Lawyer.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen G. Breyer will join UC Hastings for a Legally Speaking interview. Justice Breyer is the third U.S. Supreme Court Justice to spend time at UC Hastings in the last 13 months. He will be interviewed by UC Hastings Distinguished Professor David Faigman, an expert on constitutional theory. Justice Breyer’s most recent book Making Our Democracy Work: A Judge’s View will be the topic of discussion.”

It Will Cost You Five Dollars a Month to Use Your Debit Card Starting Next Year, But Here’s a Call to Stop That

Tuesday, October 18th, 2011

Consumers Union is on the case.

They’re trying the old moral suasion - perhaps some enterprising pols will join in?

All the deets:

“Consumers Union Calls on Bank of America & Other Major Banks to Drop Unfair Debit Card Fees

CU: It’s Unfair to Charge Customers When Banks Collect Enough From Retailers to Cover Debit Card Costs

SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 18, 2011 — Consumers Union called on Bank of America and other banks to drop plans to charge consumers monthly debit card fees. Bank of America recently announced it would charge its customers $5 each month starting in 2012 to make debit card purchases. SunTrust has started rolling out its own $5 fee and Wells Fargo and Chase are testing debit card fees in select markets.

“Americans are tired of being hit with new banking fees, especially since they’ve already paid to rescue firms like Bank of America, whose behavior helped spark the economic meltdown,” said Norma Garcia, director of Consumers Union’s financial services program. “This debit card fee just adds insult to injury. It’s unfair for the banks to stick consumers with a monthly fee just to use their own money. Bank of America and other banks can still collect enough money from retailers to cover debit card costs.”

Garcia added, “If Bank of America and the other banks refuse to drop the debit card fee, consumers should consider dropping them. There are plenty of banks and credit unions that don’t charge debit card fees that will be more than happy to accept new customers.”

Consumers Union has published a set of tips for consumers who want to switch banks.

Below is Consumers Union’s letter to Bank of America urging it to drop its debit card fee. Similar letters were sent to Chase, SunTrust, and Wells Fargo.”

See the letter after the jump.

(more…)

Jesse Jackson Coming to UC Berkeley for Fred Korematsu Day – Sunday, January 30, 2011

Tuesday, January 25th, 2011

InsideBayArea has the deets.

Korematsu vs. United States

Fred Korematsu Day in Berkeley

Come celebrate the first Fred Korematsu Day on January 30, 2011, at UC Berkeley’s Wheeler Auditorium. The program includes keynote speaker Reverend Jesse Jackson and spoken word artist Beau Sia, as well as tributes from Karen Korematsu and California Assembly Members Warren Furutani and Marty Block. There will also be a screening of the film, Of Civil Wrongs and Rights: The Fred Korematsu Story.

Fred T. Korematsu was a national civil rights hero. In 1942, at the age of 23, he refused to go to the government’s incarceration camps for Japanese Americans. After he was arrested and convicted of defying the government’s order, he appealed his case all the way to the Supreme Court. In 1944, the Supreme Court ruled against him, arguing that the incarceration was justified due to military necessity.

In 1983, Dr. Peter Irons, a legal historian, discovered key documents that government intelligence agencies had hidden from the Supreme Court in 1944. The documents consistently showed that Japanese Americans had committed no acts of treason to justify mass incarceration. With this new evidence, a legal team of mostly Japanese American attorneys re-opened Korematsu’s 40 year-old case on the basis of government misconduct. On November 10, 1983, Korematsu’s conviction was overturned in a federal court in San Francisco. It was a pivotal moment in civil rights history.

Korematsu remained an activist throughout his life. In 1998, he received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor, from President Bill Clinton. Korematsu’s growing legacy continues to inspire activists of all backgrounds and demonstrates the importance of speaking up to fight injustice.”

http://korematsuinstitute.org/korematsu-day/celebration/

(For a list of other Fred Korematsu Day events throughout the state, click here)

Join the Korematsu Institute in celebrating the first Fred Korematsu Day!

DATE & TIME
Sunday Jan. 30, 2011x
1:00pm-2:00pm: VIP reception
2:00-3:00pm: Main Program
3:00-4:00pm: General reception
4:00-5:00pm: Screening of the Emmy Award-winning film
Of Civil Wrongs and Rights: the Fred Korematsu Story (60 min)

LOCATION
Wheeler auditorium
UC Berkeley campus
Berkeley, CA

PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION
Wheeler auditorium is a 15-minute walk from the Downtown Berkeley Bart station. Click here for walking directions.

PARKING
Cal Performances does not offer parking validation for this event, but street parking is free in Berkeley on Sundays. For a list of parking lots near the UC Berkeley campus, click here. For more information about parking on campus, please click here.

SPECIAL NEEDS
Wheeler Auditorium is accessible to people with disabilities. The closest drop off point near Wheeler is the alongside South Hall (see campus map). From there, it’s a short walk up the ramp and into Wheeler.

TICKETS
$100 VIP tickets include: VIP reception + Program (and seating in VIP section) + General Reception + Film Screening
$25 Full Price tickets include: Program + General Reception + Film Screening
$15 Discount tickets for Teachers/Non-profit employees/Senior Citizens (65+) include: Program + General Reception + Film Screening
$5 Student tickets include: Program + General Reception + Film Screening

Tickets on sale now! Tickets available for purchase online, by phone, by mail and fax, and in person from Cal Performances. Tickets can be mailed to buyers or held at Will Call and picked up at Wheeler auditorium (not Zellerbach Hall) on January 30. Please buy your tickets before January 30. Though last-minute tickets will be available on the day of the event, purchases can only be made in cash.

Seating: VIP ticket holders will be able to sit in a VIP section of the auditorium. All other ticket holders are eligible for general seating, so please arrive early to find the best available seats!

Cal Performances
tickets.berkeley.edu
Phone: (510) 642-9988
Fax: (510) 643-2359
The Cal Performances Ticket Office is located at the northeast corner of Zellerbach Hall on the UC Berkeley campus.

Event web site: fredkorematsuday.org
Facebook event page: http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=117833281622710&num_event_invites=0
For questions, email info@korematsuinstitute.org or call (415) 848-7727

PROGRAM

Rev. Jesse Jackson

A keynote speech by the Reverend Jesse Jackson. The founder and president of the Rainbow PUSH Coalition, Rev. Jackson is one of America’s foremost civil rights, religious and political figures. Over the past forty years, he has played a pivotal role in virtually every movement for empowerment, peace, civil rights, gender equality, and economic and social justice. In 2000, President Bill Clinton awarded Reverend Jackson the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor. Rev. Jackson has been called the “Conscience of the Nation” and “the Great Unifier,” challenging America to be inclusive and to establish just and humane priorities for the benefit of all. He is known for bringing people together on common ground across lines of race, culture, class, gender and belief. In 1999, Fred Korematsu was honored at the Rainbow PUSH Coalition’s annual awards dinner.

Karen Korematsu
Karen Korematsu, daughter of Fred Korematsu and co-founder of the Fred T. Korematsu Institute for Civil Rights and Education. Karen shares her father’s passion for social justice and continues to advance his legacy by helping the Institute with its development and outreach efforts and speaking at events around the country.

Beau Sia

A performance by spoken word artist Beau Sia. Oklahoma-born Sia was one of the original cast members in Russell Simmon’s Def Poetry Jam, which won a Tony Award in 2003. He has also appeared in It’s Showtime at the Apollo, HBO’s Def Poetry Jam, and the film Slam. He has published a book of poetry, A Night Without Armor II: The Revenge, and released two spoken word CDs, Attack! Attack! Go!and Dope and Wack.

Rep. Keith Ellison

A video message from Minnesota Congressman Keith Ellison. Rep. Ellison is the first Muslim ever elected to U.S. Congress. He has represented the Fifth Congressional District of Minnesota in the U.S. House of Representatives since taking office on January 4, 2007.

Keith’s philosophy is one of “generosity and inclusiveness.” His roots as a community activist and his message of inclusivity through democratic participation resonates throughout the Fifth District. His priorities in Congress are: promoting peace, prosperity for working families, environmental sustainability, and civil and human rights.

Asm. Warren Furutani

California Assemblymember Warren Furutani, co-sponsor of the Fred Korematsu Day bill. Asm. Furutani was re-elected to the 55th District in 2010 for his second two-year term. Warren has over 40 years of experience and involvement in education and public service. He is also the chair of the Asian Pacific Islander American Legislative Caucus, which has ten members. In 2008, he authored Assembly Bill 37, which granted honorary college degrees to Japanese Americans whose education was disrupted due to their wrongful incarceration during World War II.

Asm. Marty Block

California Assemblymember Marty Block, co-sponsor of the Fred Korematsu Day bill. Asm. Block was elected in November 2008 to represent the 78th District, one of the most diverse districts in the county of San Diego. He is a former dean and retired professor at San Diego State University (SDSU). His passion on education issues, both at the K-12 levels and collegiate levels shows a strong regard for those who have little or no voice in the political process.

Sydnie Kohara

Emcee Sydnie Kohara is an award-winning journalist and co-anchor of the CBS 5 Eyewitness News Early Edition. She has served as an international correspondent and anchor for CNBC in London and Singapore. Kohara is no stranger to public service and community outreach. She was a political appointee under California Governor George Deukmejian, serving as Chief of Communications for the California Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs. Kohara also helped found Camp CEO, a Girl Scout-sponsored retreat for at-risk teenage girls.

The Topaz Bus Rolls Out for Last Time – Japanese Americans Visit War Relocation Camp in Utah

Thursday, August 5th, 2010

Heading out from the Bay Area to the Topaz War Relocation Center in the godforsaken high plains of Utah might not sound like much of a trip but that’s a journey that some of the Bay Area’s Nikkei had to make back in 1942.

The Central Utah Relocation Center (Topaz) is all gone, but its site is still available for visits, and there’s a museum not too far away. So that’s the destination - some people left today from the East Bay to take a ride back into history.

As seen in Japantown:

Anyway, looks like this will be the last trip.

Bon courage, Topaz Bus.

Some of those at Topaz in the 40′s:

  • Karl Ichiro Akiya (1909–2001), a writer and political activist.
  • Richard Aoki (1938–2009), an American civil rights activist.
  • Yuji Ichioka (1936–2002), an American historian who coined the term “Asian American“.
  • George Ishiyama (1914–2003), a Japanese American businessman and former president of Alaska Pulp Corporation. Also interned at Heart Mountain.
  • Tsuyako Kitashima (1918–2006), a Japanese-American activist noted for her role in seeking reparations for Japanese American internment.
  • Fred Korematsu (1919–2005), who challenged the constitutionality of Executive Order 9066 in Korematsu v. United States.
  • Toshio Mori (1910–1980), author.
  • Robert Murase (1938–2005), a world renowned landscape architect.
  • Chiura Obata (1885–1975), a Japanese-American artist.
  • Miné Okubo (1912–2001), a Japanese American artist and writer, noted for her book, Citizen 13660.
  • Mary Yamashiro Otani (1923–2005), a community activist.
  • Goro Suzuki (1917–1979), the Oakland-born entertainer remembered by millions under his stage name, Jack Soo, star of the original stage and movie productions of Flower Drum Songand remembered for his role as Detective Nick Yemana on the 1970s sitcom Barney Miller. Suzuki was a favorite performer at Topaz gatherings.
  • Dave Tatsuno (1913–2006), a Japanese American businessman who documented life in an American concentration camp on film.
  • Yoshiko Uchida (1921–1992), a Japanese American writer, most notable for her books, Desert Exile: The Uprooting of a Japanese American Family and Picture Bride.
  • Mayor Gavin Newsom’s Latest Video Postcard to the City of San Francisco is Just 22 Minutes

    Wednesday, July 28th, 2010

    Well, here it is, San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom’s lastest YouTube, taking it Direct to The People without any meddlesome media to fuzz up The Message.

    “Mayor Newsom discusses the 20thAnniversary of the Americans With Disabilities Act, Improvements in MUNI ontime performance, success of the JobsNow! program, and answers questions received by Twitter.”

    See?

    I don’t know, it’s been sitting up there on the YT for 24 hours or so and it has 197 views so far. Is that good? I don’t know.

    Is this a good way for electeds to get the word out, a good use of time?

    Again, don’t know, don’t think so, though. He’d be better off if he had showed up to all those Board of Supervisors meetings he missed over the years. He wouldn’t have enjoyed it but he’d be better off. Oh well.

    Anyway, it’s his second anniversary, so wife Jennifer Siebel should expect to see some lily of the valley when she gets back from overseas. And he’s some kind of cousin to “sort of alternative” singer Joanna Newsom. Did not know that.

    Enjoy.

    The Longest-Lived Mural Graffiti in San Francisco – Epoxy Plus Paint Equals Forever

    Tuesday, March 16th, 2010

    Here’s what the little monsters know – they know that if they tag a big old transformer box or what have you, then it’ll simply get painted over by the City or a property owner, sometimes with a quickness. But painting over a mural, such as the one called Gold Mountain at Romolo Place in North Beach near the intersection of Columbus and Broadway, well that throws all the stakeholders into paralysis and so scribblings will remain for tout le monde to see.

    Ideally, you’d have the original muralist come over and do a touchup for free. Ideally. But the long-lived tagging on Gold Mountain has epoxy in it, so it’s really hard to take off of the wall without erasing everything. And then after you do a fix-up another tagger will come along, despite your use of anti-graffiti coatings and whatnot.

    Here, take a look at the mural on Romolo from six-plus years ago – nice and clean.

    But WholeWheatToast‘s photo from 2008 looks just like every other recent photo that you can find online:

    Click to expand

    Here’s the current shot from Google Maps. (Note that Google’s face-blurring privacy program doesn’t distinguish betwixt real people and paintings of people.)

    And the pic on MapJack looks the same as well. Oh well.

    Now honestly, I’m not sure how much good putting up video cameras would do unless you had somebody to watch a live feed 24-7. I mean the value of showing the SFPD grainy night-time footage of some skinny, 5′ 8″, hoodie-wearing hood isn’t much, right?

    For all I know these tags are still there today, with more added on, possibly. I’ll check it out the next time I’m in the area.

    (San FranciscoThe City That Knows How®… to sit around and dawdle. Oh well.)

    Leaving you with what the Chinatown Community Development Center has to say about all this:

    “Gold Mountain Mural Restoration

    The Gold Mountain Mural is located at Romolo Alley, near Broadway and Columbus, on the side of the Swiss American building owned and managed by Chinatown CDC. It is the joint effort of Ms. Ann Sherry, the muralist, and Chinatown CDC depicting the lives of Chinese Americans in San Francisco. It was created in 1994, and once restored in 2004 due to heavy tagging. At that time, to honor her, we added the image of our local heroine, Ms. Betty Ann Ong. Ms. Ong is the American Airline stewardess who was the first one to contact ground crew informing them of the plane being hijacked on that fatal flight into the World Trade Center on 9/11.

    Recently, this historic mural caught the eyes of the President of the National Museum of Murals and Mosaics in Philadelphia, and will be featured in their online museum website.

    Once again, due to tagging, we will start restoring the mural in the near future. We have so far secured some funding to install surveillance cameras to safeguard the mural. Once restoration is complete, we will daily monitor the mural and assist the SFPD to apprehend taggers. (Volunteers interested to help can contact Cathie Lam at 415-984-1461.)