Posts Tagged ‘app’

de Young Museum Launches Official App – Uses Interactive 3D Mapping and Indoor Positioning Technology – iOS Only, for Now

Thursday, October 29th, 2015

I’ll have to dig up my iPod Touch to check this out sometime:

“de Young Museum Launches Official App

App uses Interactive 3D Mapping & Indoor Positioning Technology

SAN FRANCISCO (October 29, 2015) – The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco are pleased to unveil the official de Young Museum app. The de Young collaborated with Guidekick, a local start-up that offers a mobile application platform focused on visitor experiences to create an app that takes advantage of Apple’s indoor positioning technology to improve visitor experience. The de Young is the first museum to take advantage of this new technology.

“We’re thrilled to help pioneer the future for museum experiences at the de Young here in the innovation capital of the world, San Francisco” said Mark Paddon, CEO of Guidekick. “The stunning architecture was the perfect application for our 3D mapping and new indoor location technologies have allowed us to truly reimagine the ideal visitor experience.”

The de Young Museum app serves as a personal tour guide for museum-goers, featuring a 3D map of the building that pinpoints a visitor’s location to ease navigation and way-finding. The app also offers thematic tours of the permanent collection using images and audio from the museum’s curatorial team. This original content is available exclusively through the app.

The app allows a user to select a thematic tour that carefully leads them to a curated selection of works, or to navigate the galleries more freely, as location-aware alerts notify them when they pass by key artworks. The app includes selections from the museum’s collection of art from Africa, Oceania, and the Americas; early American and contemporary American art; and special features on the unique architecture of the building.

Unlike many audio tours the de Young app automatically triggers content without requiring the visitor to take an additional action, such as typing a number or scanning a code. The app has also been carefully designed to help visitors engage with artwork without visual distraction, and to avoid disrupting the experience of other patrons. Users put the phone to their ear to trigger the recording, which then plays privately, mirroring the receiving of a phone call.

The app also offers insights into the visitor experience, helping the de Young to build richer, more tailored experiences for visitors.

“Our museums are determined to take best advantage of the Bay Area’s strong focus on technological innovation,” said Gary Castro, chief information officer of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. “We’ve already begun work on an app for the de Young’s sister museum, the Legion of Honor, and our experience here will help inform the development of all kinds of new digital tools.”

Download the app.

OMG, the New SFMTA “MUNIMobile” Fare App is Here! – Beta Testing Now, Release in November! – Deets from Famous Akit!

Wednesday, October 28th, 2015

Famous Akit is helping to test MUNI’s brand-new app.

It looks like this:


All the deets! From our SFMTA! (You know, they really like EXCLAMATION POINTS over there, wow!)

“The SFMTA is excited to introduce MuniMobile: the mobile ticketing app for smartphones coming soon!

MuniMobile enables customers to purchase and use transit fares across the Muni system: bus, rail, cable car and Paratransit.

Buy Muni tickets and passes in advance or on-the-go! With MuniMobile, your phone is your fare. There’s no longer need to carry exact change or rely on fare vending machines to ride.

The app will include the following features:

Ability to purchase, store and use single or multiple Muni fares on one mobile device

Allow passengers to pay for single-ride fares, cable car rides, and one-day, three-day and seven-day passports

Industry-leading security to protect personal information and payments

Multi-language support

Responsive eCommerce website for online ticket purchases

Beta testing update: we’re received over 1,600 applicants for the Beta phase of MuniMobile – wow!

Thank you for the tremendous support!

For those who did not sign up in time or were not selected to participate in this phase, don’t worry. The public launch is right around the corner next month.”

“GREAT HIGHWAY CLOSED WHEN FLASHING” Sign Finally Lit Up – The Road Wasn’t Actually Closed, But Anyway

Thursday, September 17th, 2015

Perhaps these new signs could be plugged into a Waze or Google Maps app?

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Wednesday, April 29th, 2015

So let’s see how haha this is to you, Gentle Reader.

Here’s a typical public service ad at a SFMTA stop in the Western Addition:

P1220543 copy

You see them at about this time of year, fine.

Comes now “Eat24,” also seen in the Western A on the same day, to say:

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OK fine, Eat24.

So haha, I guess.

Harsh: “DON’T GET HAMMERED – TAKE A TAXICAB” – Oh Uber, Will You Ever Win?

Tuesday, December 30th, 2014

This of course is a reference to a very unfortunate incident.

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Uh Oh: The “Parking Angels” App is Coming – Something Like This Could Cost the Corrupt SFMTA MUNI DPT a Lot of Money

Monday, August 4th, 2014

What’s this, a way for people to band together against our corrupt SFMTA?

You tell me, Gentle Reader

Hey, what would you do if you knew you were spilling tens of thousands of gallons of petroleum into our San Francisco Bay?

Our SFMTA had a question like this. It failed. Oh well. See below.

Guess what, our SFMTA now wants you to vote yourself a rent increase in order to give it more money. You’ll have your chance to vote on it November 4th, 2014.

Ah memories:

SAN FRANCISCO (November 2, 2009) – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is taking action against the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency following federal violations of the Clean Water Act and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

On the page:

Overview and Location of Facilities

The City and County of San Francisco is a municipality organized under the laws of California that operates the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (“SFMTA”) and the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (“SFPUC”). The SFMTA operates a diverse fleet of trolley cars, street cars, light rail, alternative fuel vehicles and 495 diesel buses that are serviced and re-fueled at facilities owned and operated by the SFMTA. The SFPUC provides water, wastewater and municipal power services.

Between November and December 2005, approximately 940 barrels (39,488 gallons) of red dye diesel fuel were discharged from one of the Municipality’s underground storage tanks (USTs) at the John M. Woods Motor Coach Facility (Woods Motor Coach Facility). The diesel spread through a piping system into a storm drain, through wastewater collection piping to a pump station, into Islais Creek and eventually San Francisco Bay.

The discharge was caused by a ruptured hose. The leak continued for several days, as sensors, flashers and alarm reports and other leak indicators were ignored. This failure by SFMTA to comply with federal requirements for the management of USTs resulted in the release of diesel fuel and Clean Water Act discharge and pretreatment violations.

After this spill, EPA conducted inspections at several of SFMTA’s facilities and identified violations of EPA’s spill prevention regulations at three of them: Flynn, Kirkland, and Marin.

The five facilities covered by this settlement are in the City and County of San Francisco:

  • Woods Motor Coach Facility – 1095 Indiana Street
  • Flynn Motor Coach Facility – 15th and Harrison Street
  • Kirkland Motor Coach Facility – 151 Beach Street
  • Marin Fuel Stand – 1399 Main Street
  • Southeast Water Collection System Pump Station”

Forget Meals on Wheels, How About Bites from Bikes? New “FastBites” Will Deliver a Single Slice of Pizza to You via Cyclists

Friday, July 11th, 2014

All the deets:

Deliver for FastBite! Flexible Hours! (SOMA / south beach)

Are you looking for a fun and reliable job? Do you love delicious food? We want you on our team!

FastBite is a new startup in San Francisco that is changing the way people order food. Customers can get pizza slices and other popular menu items delivered within minutes straight from their mobile phone. We’re looking for enthusiastic team members to help us deliver happy customers!

Job Details:
Pay: $16 per hour
Location: San Francisco
Hours: Any and all combinations of the hours below. You pick your days!
Weekday Dinner (6pm – 10pm) AND/OR
Weekend Dinner (6pm – 10pm)

Qualified applicants:
– MUST know how to check texts, email, use internet, and use maps on a smart phone
– Be smiley and personable
– Have a bicycle and easy access to the city
– Be excited about food!
– Have a clean appearance…”

Dennis Herrera Throws Down: Tells “Monkey Parking” to Drop Mobile App for Auctioning City Parking Spots – $300 Fines?

Monday, June 23rd, 2014

[UPDATE: SFist (lots of comments already), Slate, and the San Francisco Chronicle are on the case.]

Gotta say I sort of saw this one coming.

And it’s not just Monkey Parking that’s in trouble today. Check out the craigslist ad from ParkModo (cached website) (@ParkModo – no Tweets yet, or maybe they were deleted?), posted on June 17th, 2014:

Earn $13.00 P/H Just To Park! (mission district)

Our company is launching an awesome app that rewards people to sell their on-street parking spots before leaving to people who need a spot.

To help us promote the app, we are looking for 20 people with cars and iPhones to park around the mission and use the app to offer their parking spots to people looking for parking.

The hours will be from 5:30-9:00 pm Thurs-Sat starting June 26th.

This is how it works:

1. You download the app from the app store.
2. When you want to work, you will contact our field manager to check in.
3. The field manager will then instruct you as to what area and type of spot you are to park in.
4. You will then find a spot in the area and park.
5. Once you are parked, using the app, you will offer the spot for sale. 
6. While you are waiting for someone to purchase the space, you will distribute postcards and promote the app.
7. Once someone purchases the spot, you will complete the transaction with the buyer and then find another space to park in and start the process all over again!

If you are interested, please click on the link below (Paste into your browser) and provide your information so we can contact you and get you started.

We look forward to working with you!”

I think ParkModo’s operations will now be on hold, for a little bit at least. But do you want some more from them? See below.

Now, all the deets about all these troubled businesses, from Herrera’s office:

“Herrera tells Monkey Parking to drop mobile app for auctioning city parking spots

Motorists face $300 fines for each violation under existing law, City Attorney says — and three startups could be liable for penalties of up to $2,500 for each transaction

SAN FRANCISCO (June 23, 2014) — San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera today issued an immediate cease-and-desist demand to Monkey Parking, a mobile peer-to-peer bidding app that enables motorists to auction off the public parking spaces their vehicles occupy to nearby drivers.   The app, currently available for iOS devices, describes itself on the Apple iTunes App Store as the “the first app which lets you make money every time that you are about to leave your on-street parking spot.”

The letter Herrera’s office issued this morning to Paolo Dobrowolny, CEO of the Rome, Italy-based tech startup, cites a key provision of San Francisco’s Police Code that specifically prohibits individuals and companies from buying, selling or leasing public on-street parking.  Police Code section 63(c) further provides that scofflaws — including drivers who “enter into a lease, rental agreement or contract of any kind” for public parking spots — face administrative penalties of up to $300 for each violation.  Because Monkey Parking’s business model is wholly premised on illegal transactions, the letter contends that the company would be subject to civil penalties of up to $2,500 per violation under California’s tough Unfair Competition Law were the city to sue.  Such a lawsuit would be imminent, Herrera’s office vowed, should the startup continue to operate in San Francisco past July 11, 2014.

Technology has given rise to many laudable innovations in how we live and work — and Monkey Parking is not one of them,” Herrera said.  “It’s illegal, it puts drivers on the hook for $300 fines, and it creates a predatory private market for public parking spaces that San Franciscans will not tolerate.  Worst of all, it encourages drivers to use their mobile devices unsafely — to engage in online bidding wars while driving.  People are free to rent out their own private driveways and garage spaces should they choose to do so.  But we will not abide businesses that hold hostage on-street public parking spots for their own private profit.”

Herrera’s cease-and-desist demand to Monkey Parking includes a request to the legal department of Apple Inc., which is copied on the letter, asking that the Cupertino, Calif.-based technology giant immediately remove the mobile application from its App Store for violating several of the company’s own guidelines.  Apple App Store Review Guidelines provide that “Apps must comply with all legal requirements in any location where they are made available to users” and that “Apps whose use may result in physical harm may be rejected.”

Two other startups that similarly violate local and state law with mobile app-enabled schemes intended to illegally monetize public parking spaces in San Francisco will also face legal action in the form of cease-and-desist demands this week, according to the City Attorney’s Office.  Sweetch charges a $5 flat fee when its users obtain a parking spot from another Sweetch motorist.  Sweetch drivers who pass their spots off to other Sweetch members are refunded $4 of that fee.  ParkModo, which appears poised to launch later this week, according to recent employment postings on Craigslist, will employ drivers at a rate of $13.00 per hour to occupy public parking spaces in the Mission District.  As with Monkey Parking and Sweetch, ParkModo then plans to sell the on-street parking spots to its paying members through its iPhone app.  Sweetch and ParkModo members who make use of the apps to park in San Francisco are also subject to civil penalties of $300 per violation, and both companies are potentially liable for civil penalties of $2,500 per transaction for illegal business practices under the Cali04fornia Unfair Competition Law.

A copy of Herrera’s demand letter to Monkey Parking and additional information about the San Francisco City Attorney’s Office is available at:”

And here’s a little more from ParkModo:

“We are currently rolling out the beta in the following cities…

San Francisco – As beautiful as city it is, parking is just as bad! Not only is there way to much demand for the supply, but the parking police will catch you if they can! Be among the first 1000 people to download the app and get $5 in free parking!

New York – Instead of calling it the city that never sleeps, they should call it the city that never has parking! Get in on ParkModo and earn some serious cash and stop wasting your time. We know every minute in ny is precious.

Chicago – There may be wind here, but there is certainly no parking! Use ParkModo and fly like the wind when you need a space!”

SpotMojo App Comes to San Francisco Asking, “What Do YOU Want Here?” – Every Man a King, Every Woman a NIMBY

Tuesday, April 8th, 2014

Read all about it right here.

This is the sign what’s hung off of a long-empty building in the Western Addition these days:

Click to expand

Hey, maybe the whorehouse could move back to this block – it was doing land-office business until about a half-decade back.

Hey, why not rent the place yourself, Gentle Reader? It’s huge, like a restaurant bar kid of deal. The rent’s only $17k per month, last I heard.

Anyway SpotMojo, I don’t get you.

Just saying.


San Francisco Viral Video: An Uptown Tenderloin Thief Patiently Waits to Steal a MacBook Air – Blonde vs. Brunette

Monday, April 7th, 2014

This one’s gone viral, this coffee shop video.

Watch the last part first and then watch the whole thing over again:

Note the thief’s ridiculous get-up. Is she really a blonde? Is that a wig under the beanie hat?

Note her dime store purse – see how she asks her original mark to watch it for her, you know, to establish a trusting environment?

And of what use is a MacBook without its expensive power cord?


But I’ll tell you, millions of people will end up seeing this video of the Tenderloin District of San Francisco, up there at Post and Taylor.

The victim feels that SF is “an amazing city otherwise.”

UPDATE: If you have any more information about the girl in black and white, please reach out to the San Francisco Police Department at (415) 315-2400.

Case Number: 140281005

I am a freelance iOS developer. I live and work in San Francisco. A total tragedy happened to me yesterday. My virtual limbs (aka MacBook Air and iPhone) were stolen at a local coffee shop on Post st. and Taylor st. in SF Downtown area. Months worth of creative work I stored on my device will be lost forever, if I can’t catch this girl and get my computer back. Click here for new New Updates


Video found at :

Location: Post & Taylor

Time of Crime: April 4, 4:35pm (The time in surveillance camera is 12 hours off)

At 3:20pm, This blonde thief comes into the coffee shop and eyes my computer.”

And now a word for the trolls:

Thank u thank u. All my friends and good Samaritans out there who are helping me in my effort to get my computer back. Had a few people on YouTube and Reddit who claimed they know her. Yay!

The thief still remains at large. Any tips will be appreciated.

On the side note, too many trolls are flooding the posts with hateful comments and are distracting people from finding this thief. Most of those people are putting blame on me. Calling me stupid and deserving to have these expensive electronics stolen from me. I know I shouldn’t have left my computer unattended but I had false sense of security because I go to the same coffee shop every day and I know every single employee and regulars who were there when the crime happened. But how can a decent person defend an apparent thief who came in with one motive in mind, which was to steal someone’s computer. The thief sat there for an hour looking around to find her target and did not hesitate to take advantage of the opportune moment. This could happen to anyone the moment you drop your guard a little at a public place. I’m determined to find this thief for the principle of the matter and hope that no other coders/designers/any other techies around the Bay Area who love their computer more than anything fall victim to this bottom feeding scumbag bitch.

One more note, I got all my codes backed up unlike some trolls bashed me about. What I lost is some of my illustrations and most recent personal files.”

On It Goes