Posts Tagged ‘Approach’

Know Better Your Failed Jetliners: MD-11 Above 1 Rincon – Made in CA in the LBC – Too Crashy for Passenger Use

Friday, February 28th, 2014

So most of these three-engine jets are now freighters.

Three-engined jetliners sort-of-made-sense back in the day, back when turbofan engines were less reliable and less powerful. But these days, in the era of the Big Twin, the only use for trijets is as a freighter.

As here, near the tall, tall Rincon 1 building in SoMa, a UPS Airlines freighter coming in to SFO from an unusual direction on account of the crazy wind we’ve been having:

Click to expand

Fundamentally, the MD-11 is an evolution of the ill-starred McDonnell-Douglas DC-10, which became a very unappealing aircraft back in the 1970′s. It was like girl you got a fat ass, girl you need a makeover. So she was made over. And the resulting MD-11 is indeed sexier, more appealing to operators, and that’s why you can still see them above.

But, as they say, mistakes were made. The tailplane was decreased in size for improved fuel economy however the MD11 became trickier to handle as a result.

And twinjets will always beat any fuel efficiency race with trijets.

Oh well.

December 3rd, 2011 was San Francisco’s DAY WITHOUT CLOUDS – A Jumbo Sky Filled with (Quiet) Jumbo Jets

Sunday, December 4th, 2011

Yesterday, owing to the unusual winds what blew away* the fog, I saw jumbo jets above S.F. in places where I normally don’t, but I couldn’t really hear  them. (I guess jets have gotten a lot quieter these days.)

Like  this low-flying United Air 747-400 near the Ferry Building – you could hardly hear it:

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*I suppose – cf. yesterday’s Blue Sky Red Bridge from Burrito Justice

U.S. Coast Guard Recovers Huge Buoy Off of San Francisco

Tuesday, January 6th, 2009

What were you doing new year’s eve? Well, that was probably more fun than what the crew of Coast Guard Cutter Aspen did, which was fix our buoy problem.

The San Francisco Approach Lighted Whistle Buoy SF, commonly known as the “Sea Buoy” was recovered by the Coast Guard Cutter ASPEN. The buoy was found on the sea floor in its assigned position, still attached to its mooring. The buoy was lifted onto the deck of the ASPEN, and will be brought back to San Francisco for repairs

They’re looking into why it sank – it might have been hit by an outbound vessel. Click to expand:  

Doesn’t look like too much fun.  

Let’s be careful out there.