Posts Tagged ‘arguello’

Presenting the Newish Sidewalks of Arguello in the Presidio: The “Arguello Gap Closure Project”

Wednesday, July 16th, 2014

I’ll tell you man, at first I didn’t notice this change on Arguello in the Presidio, the Arguello Gap Closure Project.

Click to expand

Anyway, enjoy.

Improves pedestrian and bicyclist safety by widening road to provide:

• New pedestrian path
• New bike lanes with lane markings and  signage
• Addresses gap in pedestrian and bicycle network between southern portion of the Presidio with the Main Post
• Relocation of street lights
• Updated storm drain infrastructure”

OMG, OMG, Meet Hundreds of Adorable Goats Today at the Presidio! Nature’s Lawnmowers Come to the Golf Course

Tuesday, August 7th, 2012

Get on up to the Presidio today at 1:00 PM to see hundreds of goats being delivered to clean up the areas surround our Presidio Golf Course. Deets below.

And then, to make your day completely hurcine, go ahead and nosh on a warm Goat Cheese Naploleon at the popular Presidio Cafe:

GOAT CHEESE NAPOLEON – warm Laura Chenel goat cheese, puff pastry, sweet & spicy pecans, fresh berries & balsamic dressing

It’s the circle of life, or something, nom nom.

Oh, here they are:

Three Boer Goats via Jennifer Schwalm

(When young, these critters kind of look like dogs.)

All the deets:

“NATURE’S LAWNMOWERS” REPORT FOR TOUR OF DUTY AT PRESIDIO GOLF COURSE

Date: Tuesday August 7, 2012

Time: 1:00pm

Location: Presidio Golf Course; behind the clubhouse (300 Finley Road, inside the Arguello Gate)

Who: The Presidio Trust and Arnold Palmer Golf welcome a herd of goats to the Presidio Golf Course to tame the overgrown ivy, blackberry and hemlock that have popped up around the links. The goats will arrive at 1:00pm on Tuesday, August 7 and will be corralled at the clubhouse for about an hour when the public can “meet the goats.” After all the goats are unloaded, they will be shepherded by three border collies to a site near the driving range.

What: The 250-300 Boer goats begin their culinary odyssey in an overgrown thicket behind the driving range. The hungry herd’s two-week tour of duty will be spent chomping through weeds and transforming them into natural fertilizer, allowing native grasses to flourish. Once the unwanted vegetation has been eaten back, not only can errant golf balls be retrieved, but serpentine soil will be revealed. The hope is long buried seeds will sprout, enabling native wildflowers and grasses to once again take root and thrive. The goats’ next stop will be a wetland area near the 4TH hole now thick with thistle and hemlock.

The project is part of a broader effort to upgrade the course using sustainable means whenever possible. Improvements are planned for every hole and bunker on the course, including the creation of so-called “fuzzy bunkers” using native plants and grasses. The result will be a course that is both more attractive and more challenging, with a less manicured and wilder look evocative of traditional Scottish links courses.

Originally constructed in 1895, the Presidio Golf Course is the second oldest course west of the Mississippi. Long restricted to members of the military and the exclusive Presidio Golf Club, the course was opened to public play 1995.

The goats are supplied by California Grazing, a holistic land management company that provides brush and weed control through grazing.”

See you there!

The Reason Why Arguello Isn’t Called First Avenue, Plus Bloggish Snark from a Century Ago, Plus NIMBYs!

Monday, September 13th, 2010

Arguello Boulevard used to be called 1st Avenue, back in the day. (That makes sense since it’s right next to 2nd Avenue.) The story of how it got its name changed to honor José Darío Argüello a century ago can be found in the SF History Encyclopedia.

Check it, there was an official San Francisco street renaming commission with a sweeping proposal:

“The scheme called for First Avenue to become Arguello, Second Avenue to become Borcia, Third Avenue to become Coronado, continuing for all 26 letters of the alphabet. Starting with Twenty-seventh Avenue, the streets would be designated by male or female saints, starting with San Antonio and ending with Santa Ynez at Forty-Seventh Avenue. Unable to find Spanish saints with names beginning with K, Q, W, X or Z, they chose first Alcatraz, then Ayala for Forty-eighth Avenue and La Playa for Forty-ninth Avenue.”

See? So when you talk about your favorite new restaurant on the 200-block of Clement, just tell your friends the joint is between Borcia and Coronado – they’ll love it.

This cartoon from the ‘Xam certainly is irreverent, borderline snarky:

And The Embarcadero used to be called East Street?

“Lost! Lost in barbarous Mexico”

But the renaming scheme ran into a little blowback from racist NIMBY landed gentry residents and insular neighborhood associations, much as it would today.

“The neighborhood newspaper, The Richmond Banner, editorialized on November 19: “If the wishes of the twelve of our “patriotic” supervisors are carried out, our Sunset and Richmond districts will soon be known as the Spanish Town of San Francisco, and ‘The Spanish will then have taken San Francisco’ notwithstanding Dewey’s victory at Manila Bay several years ago.” The editorial contrasted the twelve who voted for the name changes against the five “true Americans” who resisted the proposal to “Spaniardize” the districts. “The people of Sunset and Richmond are fully aroused and will never submit to the insult and injustice heaped upon them by the majority of the Board of Supervisors.” In closing, the editor pledged, “Sunset and Richmond districts will stand together and fight this miserable surrender of American names to a finish.”

O.K. then.

But, as you probably already know, everything got worked out in a Grand Compromise:

“Bowing to the pressure, the Commission agreed that the avenues could remain unchanged except for First Avenue and Forty-ninth Avenueand the alphabetical cross-streets would be the only other western district streets to be renamed, except for the Geary Street extension. The name of Point Lobos was removed from most of the Richmond, but would be given to the curving road that extended from Fortieth Avenue to the Cliff House.”

And here’s the conclusion:

“The street naming of 1909 started with the noblest of motives. It soon took on the atmosphere of a farcical comic opera. The outraged citizenry made exaggerated claims rife with bombastic racism, nationalism and religious partisanship.”

Same As It Ever Was

How to Deal with the Cable Monopoly in San Francisco – Tim Redmond vs. Comcast

Wednesday, June 2nd, 2010

Or, How to Beat Comcast.

Seems as if Tim Redmond is just a tiny bit irked with Big Cable these days. So much so, that he even complained directly to Comcast’s Big Guy, Brian Roberts.

Artist’s conception of the leader of our TV monopoly:

(It must be a hard knock life listening to people complain about their TV service…)

The thing is that the last thing monopolies want to do is hire more people. So, you need to think before you let Comcast waste your time and money. Here are four options:

1. Avoid that service center down on Portola. Comcast’s other office in the inner, Inner Richmond District is a veritable ghost town of lonely employees yearning for the company of customers needing help. Check it out at 3732 Geary Blvd (between Arguello Blvd & 2nd Ave). You’ll be in and out in no time – that’s much better than the old days when you had to wait all day for a “trained” tech to come out.

2. Cancel Comcast and get a dish. I don’t know how it works or which system is better, but it couldn’t be worse than Comcast, right? Certainly would be cheaper and you wouldn’t be giving your hard-earned to a monopoly.

3. Cancel Comcast and just use rabbit ears. I’ll tell you, my Sony is approaching two decades of service and it displays that digital TV just fine. I mean, if your show isn’t on channels 2, 4, 5, 7, or 9 it’s just not worth watching, right? Comcast wants you to think you need cable TV but you don’t need cable TV. Try a Comcast vacation for 30 days and then you’ll wonder why you ever gave those melon-farmers $1000 (after taxes!) a year.

4. Threaten to cancel Comcast and have them lower your bill to less than $30. Here’s what you do, love. Just ring up (877) 870-4310 and tell them you don’t want cable no mo. (This is a lie, but that’s O.K.) They’ll ask you why and then you’ll tell them that you just got laid off or something. Then it’s name-your-price time, baby. Have them throw in a digital box, free HBO, I don’t know, whatever. They’ll lower your bill wayyyyyy down for six months or a year or whatnot. Then it’ll be time to call them up all over again. Easy peasy. As they say, Asking Comcast To Lower Your Bill Results In Comcast Lowering Your Bill. But of course, you don’t just ask, you tell them you can’t afford it and you want to cancel.

Am I saying that you’re a sucker if you don’t call up Comcast right now at (877) 870-4310 and threaten to cancel? Yes. Yes I am.

Choose or lose.

It’s Hard to Tell You’re in California’s Fourth-Largest City When at Andy Goldsworthy’s Spire

Wednesday, May 12th, 2010

I guess you can see a famous landmark in the background, but otherwise this scene in the Presidio is fairly bucolic. 

“Spire” by Andy Goldsworthy. Click to expand

Enveloping the Presidio with lush greenery, the historic forest is a beloved park feature. It provides habitat for birds and wildlife and also contributes to the Presidio’s designation as a National Historic Landmark District.

The Presidio forest was planted over a relatively short period of time and is more than 100 years old. While the eucalyptus trees continue to thrive, the pines and cypress are declining. Each year, the Presidio Trust replants two to three acres, staggering the effort to create an uneven-aged forest that can be more easily sustained.

Since 2002, the Trust has planted nearly 2,000 trees and is preserving the qualities that define the forest’s character, such as the orderly military alignment of trees. The Trust’s reforestation strategy also takes into account the forest’s importance as wildlife habitat and considers the needs of visitors who walk in its shade or admire the views it frames.

The grove along the Bay Area Ridge Trail near the Arguello Gate (see photo above) is predominantly cypress trees. The Trust has removed 150 dying trees from this area and will replant 1,200 trees along the Bay Area Ridge Trail over the next 10 years.

In 2006, artist Andy Goldsworthy visited the Presidio and was inspired by the history and character of the forest. He saw an opportunity to create a sculpture with the felled mature trees. Constructed in October 2008, The Spire tells the story of the forest, celebrates its history and natural rhythms, and welcomes the next generation of trees. It is a poetic reference to the forest’s past; as new young trees grow up to meet the sculpture, it will eventually disappear into the forest.

Andy Goldsworthy was born in 1956 and spent his childhood in Yorkshire, England. Goldsworthy’s work has been made in the open air, in places as diverse as the Yorkshire Dales, the North Pole, and the Australian Outback. His works in the Bay Area include Stone River at Stanford University, made from the rubble left after the Loma Prieta earthquake, and Drawn Stone at the De Young Museum in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park, which also recalls San Francisco’s earthquakes and their effects.

Goldsworthy draws his inspiration from places and creates art from the materials found close at hand, such as twigs, leaves, stones, snow and ice, reeds, and thorns. The works made from these natural materials interact in different ways with their environments. The Presidio’s man-made forest is an evocative backdrop for the artist who strives “to make connections between what we call nature and what we call man-made.”

Spire recalls one of Goldsworthy’s earliest sculptures, Memories, also spires of mature trees, created in 1984 in the Grizedale Forest in the Lake District of North West England. “I have not found another great location for this type of work until now.”

The Spire is located on the Bay Area Ridge Trail near the Arguello Gate, west of Inspiration Point Overlook and north of the Presidio Golf Course Clubhouse (view Spire map).”

The Reason Why San Francisco Loves the ForTwo Smart Car: Easy Parking

Friday, March 6th, 2009

Even a Mini Cooper would have trouble parallel parking in this space, but a red fortwo from smart had no trouble at all. Now the driver has full access to the Clement street shopping district. And it appears to be parked legally, unlike some other smarts in town these days that park 90 degrees the wrong way.

Hurray!

Click to expand

Look for the fortwo in the new movie release The Pink Panther II, starring Steve Martin.

Base-model MSRP is now a bit over $12k – maybe it’s for you.

An Unexpected River in the Presidio on the Arguello Bike Line

Tuesday, October 28th, 2008

This is what it looked like the other night on dark, dark Arguello Avenue coming up out of the Main Post near Infantry Terrace. An unexpected river flowing down the bike lane, leaving you with the option of just pushing your rig uphill on the sidewalk (which some people do anyway, owing to the steepness).

Click to expand:

A busted water main or another unearthed spring?

You make the call.