Posts Tagged ‘asian art museum’

Seattle Had Its Spoon Man, But San Francisco Had Pigeon Man – Remembering Civic Center’s #1 Pigeon-Feeder of 2012

Thursday, July 24th, 2014

Forget about superwellknown Spoon Man from two decades back.

Just two years ago, San Francisco had its own icon – Pigeon Man.

All the pigeons of Civic Center knew Pigeon Man was coming – they’d walk with him down Larkin, Pied Piper-style. See?

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They used the crosswalk better than the average San Francisco pedestrian:

Here was the reward, some kind of grain, like what the Road Runner used to peck at:

Hurray!

“Art” Happens on McAllister Street – Colorful Origami Crane Birds Suddenly Appear on Our Asian Art Museum

Tuesday, July 16th, 2013

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Oh, and Membership at the Asian Art Museum / Chong-Moon Lee Center for Asian Art and Culture is cheaper than you might think…

Awesome Bronze Japanese Guardian Lions Installed at Our Asian Art Museum – Donated by Marsha Vargas Handley

Tuesday, May 14th, 2013

I missed the big installation yesterday but KTSF was there.

Check it.

Here’s what the “South Lion” looks like.  Its left paw is “resting on a Buddhist jewel with an openwork design of sculpted peonies, a flower closely associated with lions.” DNKT.

This is a composite shot, but it’s the best one I have now. Guardian lion, 1868-1912. Japan. Bronze. Gift of Marsha Vargas Handley in memory of Raymond G. Handley 

These critters certainly have found an appropriate resting place!

The ceremonial unveiling is coming soon.

All the deets from your Asian Art Museum:

“ASIAN ART MUSEUM INSTALLS TWO JAPANESE BRONZE LIONS ON FRONT STEPS

The Asian Art Museum has installed two monumental Japanese bronze lion sculptures on granite plinths outside the museum’s front entrance on Larkin Street. Recently acquired by the museum through a donation from longtime supporter Marsha Vargas Handley in memory of Raymond G. Handley, the 800 lb. sculptures date to the late nineteenth century and are similar to the majestic guardian lions typically placed opposite each other outside Buddhist temples and Shinto shrines.

The practice of adorning public buildings with sculptures of lions is a time-honored custom in the US–the New York Public Library and the Art Institute of Chicago are noteworthy examples. The granite plinths outside the Asian Art Museum may well have been intended to support sculptures of lions when the building was originally built in 1916 to serve as the San Francisco Main Public Library. The museum is now following that longstanding tradition–this time with a uniquely Asian spin–giving a sneak peek of the treasures held inside.

The lion on the museum’s south side has its left paw resting on a Buddhist jewel, with an openwork design of sculpted peonies, a flower closely associated with lions. The south lion’s mouth is open, and the north lion’s is closed, symbolizing the sounds and spirit of the Japanese pronunciation of the first and last letters of the Sanskrit alphabet: “A” is pronounced with the mouth open, and “Un” with the mouth closed.

Physical Description: These lions’ enormous size—nearly five feet tall and six feet long— and standing positions are unusual. Paired guardian lions outside shrines today are often shown seated or crouching, and most are made of stone, wood, or, less commonly, ceramic. This pair of large sculptures also stands out in material (bronze). Relatively few bronze guardian lions from before World War II survive, due in part to mandatory metal collections ordered by the Japanese government during the war.

Conservation: The lions have undergone extensive conservation treatment, including repairs to the feet that fasten them to a new, customized base—a strategy of earthquake preparedness. Several layers of protective coating were applied to resist weathering of Ceremonial Unveiling: Details for a forthcoming ceremonial unveiling event will be announced soon.”

CRASH! Ginger Skaterboy Attacks MUNI Bus Stop Near City Hall – Broken Glass Everywhere – How #19 Polk Failed

Tuesday, May 7th, 2013

Here he is, in front of the Asian Art Museum.

Art student? I’m thinking art student with $19 headphones. Anyway…

…he’s the one who took out a huge panel of glass at the formerly famous* bus stop at McAllister and Larkin last week. There’s his weapon and there’s some of the glass he broke.

A modern-day warrior/Mean mean stride/ Today’s Tom Sawyer/ Mean mean pride:

Then, as twenty-odd people were staring at him, he yelled, “You should have stopped, Bitch!”

Indeed, a #19 Polk had just passed by him and a small crowd of fellow MUNI “passengers.”

Then, Dude sauntered up Polk, thusly:

How much does it cost Clear Channel / us to fix a glass panel at a MUNI bus stop? I know not.

$1000? $10,000?

On It Goes…

Exit the warrior, 
Today’s Tom Sawyer, 
He gets high on you, 
And the energy you trade, 
He gets right on to the friction of the day.

*Man-child Gavin Newsom had a press conference at the old bus stop at this location, back when urban farming was hot in the late-aughts. As seen from the CAAG’s Office, 355 McAllister:

OMG, They’re Here – China’s Terracotta Warriors are at Our Asian Art Museum Until May 27 – A Must See

Thursday, February 21st, 2013

This is it, this is history.

Get your tickets.

Heh:

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Heh: Asian Art Museum “Loses” Terracotta Warrior – “2,112 Years Old, About 5’ 5” Tall, Mud-Colored, and Doesn’t Speak English”

Thursday, January 24th, 2013

Heh:

“The Asian Art Museum needs your help. One of our terracotta warriors is lost, and we have to find him before China’s Terracotta Warriors: The First Emperor’s Legacy opens on February 22. What we know is this: a small group of terracotta warriors journeyed from their home in China to the museum—but somewhere along the way, this one took a wrong turn and is now missing. He’s 2,112 years old, about 5’ 5” tall, mud-colored, and doesn’t speak English.”

“If you spot him, please post a photo on Twitter, Instagram, or our Facebook wall and tag it with #LOSTWARRIOR so we can track his whereabouts on this map. Even if you don’t have photos, share and tag your tips and leads with #LOSTWARRIOR. Every little bit counts.
REWARD: Those who help may be eligible to win passes to the exhibition. Please spread the word, and thanks! Here’s our director Jay Xu with a personal call to action.

Heh.

Your Asian Art Museum: Terracotta Warriors on Sale Now, Out of Character Calligraphy Continues, India Celebration Nov 18th

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012

Famous Asian Art Museum supporter Jerry Yang came by to introduce Out of Character: Decoding Chinese Calligraphy so that was nice.

Anyway, here’s what’s going on these days:

Out of Character: Decoding Chinese Calligraphy 
Through January 13, FREE with museum admission

The SF Chronicle has called Out of Character–the first major American exhibition on calligraphy in more than a decade–a “smashing show” that aims to make Chinese calligraphy “less mysterious.” Many of the masterpieces are on public view for the first time, but that’s not all. Rounding out this beautiful presentation are a few modern paintings by abstract American artists and a short animated film by contemporary Chinese artist Xu Bing. Whet your appetite with this fun trailer.

Finally: Tickets for Terracotta Warriors Available Starting Today 
Exhibition Opens February 22

Last month we filled you in on the Terracotta Warriors’ impending visit. Starting today, you can hop online and purchase advance tickets to see the Eighth Wonder of the World. We’re anticipating big crowds, so getting tickets now is your best bet. Click here to get started.

India Celebration 
Sunday, November 18, 11:00 am-4:00 pm
FREE with museum admission

It’s almost time for Diwali, one of India’s most important festivals of the year. More popularly known as the festival of lights, it’s named after the row of lamps that are symbolically lit outside homes. Here’s how we’ll celebrate at the museum: a performance with Ashwin Batish (of “sitar power” fame) and his family, Hindi script art activities, yoga with kids, storytelling tours with families, and more.

Other Events in November 

11/3 – Screening: World of Alarmel Valli
11/3 – Talk: An Indian Way of Seeing
11/4 – Target First Free Sunday Featuring Calligrapher Kong Pak-yu
11/20 and beyond – Holiday Art Activity for Families

Photos from Asian Art Museum’s “In the Moment: Japanese Art from the Larry Ellison Collection” – Opens June 2013

Thursday, September 20th, 2012

Here’s the big news from Kenneth Baker yesterday.

More deets:

“Called “In the Moment: Japanese Art from the Larry Ellison Collection,” the exhibit will include works by noted artists of the Momoyama (1573—1615) and Edo (1615—1868) periods along a 13th—14th century wooden sculpture of Shotoku Taishi; six-panel folding screens dating to the 17th century by Kano Sansetsu; and 18th century paintings by acclaimed masters Maruyama Okyo and Ito Jakuchu.”

This should be an excellent show.

All photos courtesy of the Asian Art Museum:

Shotoku Taishi as an Infant, Unknown, Kamakura period (1249-1335). Wood with polychromy. Larry Ellison Collection

Tigers (detail), 1779. By Maruyama Okyo (Japanese, 1733-1795). One of a pair of hanging scrolls; ink and light colors on paper. Larry Ellison Collection.

Auspicious Pine, Bamboo, Plum, Crane and Turtles, Edo period (1615-1868),ca. 1630-1650. By Kano Sansetsu (Japanese, 1590-1651,By Sansetsu, Kano 1590-1651. One of a pair of six panel folding screens. Ink and colors on gold. Larry Ellison Collection

Oh, and don’t forget about Korean Culture Day this Sunday, September 23, 2012. It’s free!

“IN THE MOMENT: JAPANESE ART FROM THE LARRY ELLISON COLLECTION
Asian Art Museum debuts Ellison’s Japanese art collection, coinciding with 2013 America’s Cup

SAN FRANCISCO, September 20, 2012—Next summer, as the America’s Cup Challenger Series takes to San Francisco Bay, the Asian Art Museum will feature an exhibition of Japanese art from the rarely seen collection of Larry Ellison, Oracle CEO and owner of ORACLE TEAM USA, defender of the 2013 America’s Cup.

In the Moment: Japanese Art from the Larry Ellison Collection will introduce approximately 80 exceptional artworks spanning 1,300 years. The exhibition explores the dynamic nature of art selection and display in traditional Japanese settings, where artworks are often temporarily presented in response to a special occasion or to reflect the change of seasons. In the Moment also considers Mr. Ellison’s active involvement in displaying art in his Japanese-style home, shedding light on his appreciation for Japan’s art and culture.

Included in the exhibition are significant works by noted artists of the Momoyama (1573–1615) and Edo (1615–1868) periods along with other important examples of religious art, lacquer, woodwork, and metalwork. Highlights include a 13th–14th century wooden sculpture of Shotoku Taishi; six-panel folding screens dating to the 17th century by Kano Sansetsu; and 18th century paintings by acclaimed masters Maruyama Okyo and Ito Jakuchu.

“This exhibition offers a rare glimpse of an extraordinary collection,” said Jay Xu, director of the Asian Art Museum. “We aim to present it in a fresh and original way that explores traditional Japanese principles governing the relationship of art to our surroundings and social relationships.”

The exhibition is organized by the Asian Art Museum and curated by Dr. Laura Allen, the museum’s curator of Japanese art, and Melissa Rinne, associate curator of Japanese art, in consultation with Mr. Ellison’s curator, Dr. Emily Sano.

The exhibition is on view June 28, 2013 through September 22, 2013. The Asian Art Museum will serve as the only venue for the exhibition.

For more information visit: www.asianart.org

Your Asian Art Museum: Free “Phantoms” This Sunday! Korean Culture Day Sept 23! Origami Graffiti!

Friday, August 31st, 2012

OMG, your world-class Asian Art Museum is busy busy busy these days.

First up is the origami paper-crane pop-up graffiti bombing of the McAllister wall.

Get all the deets from the Uptown Almanac, the San Francisco Chronicle and KGO-ABC.

Here’s how it’s holding up, last night…

…and the day before:

It’s persevering, huh?

Next up is the closing of the Big Show, check it:

Phantoms of Asia: Contemporary Awakens the Past

CLOSING THIS SUNDAY

Just as this exhibition has touched upon the fleeting nature of life, it too must come to an end. An expansive exploration of spirituality, cosmic order, and the afterlife, it’s a provocative presentation of both contemporary art and older objects from our collection. The result is a one-of-a-kind journey transcending time and place. Phantoms will go out with a bang: everyone can see it for FREE this Sunday, as part of our Target First Free Sunday.”

I’d recommend showing up early or late on Sept 2, 2012.  Feel free to practice your Gangnam Style while waiting in line. Speaking of which, don’t forget about:

Korean Culture Day 2012

Sunday, September 23
11 am–4 pm
Museum-wide 

Free admission”

All the deets on that after the jump.

(more…)

Welcome Back, Terracotta: China’s Famous Terracotta Warriors Coming Back to Our Asian Art Museum February 22, 2013

Thursday, August 16th, 2012

They’re ba-aaack!

Armored General, Qin dynasty 221-206 BCE, Height 203 cm, weight 250 kg. Excavated from Pit 1, Qin Shihuang tomb complex, 1980. Reproduced with kind permission from the Qin Shihuang Terracotta Warriors and Horses Museum. Serial number 002747.

All the deets:

“CHINA’S TERRACOTTA WARRIORS:THE FIRST EMPEROR’S LEGACY - Asian Art Museum kicks off 10th anniversary in Civic Center with epic exhibition

SAN FRANCISCO, August 15, 2012—The Asian Art Museum kicks off its 10th anniversary in San Francisco’s Civic Center with an exhibition from one of the greatest archaeological discoveries in modern time. China’s Terracotta Warriors: The First Emperor’s Legacy will be on view February 22 – May 27, 2013.

The exhibition features 120 rare objects from the great tomb complex of China’s First Emperor (259-210 BCE), including 10 life-size terracotta figures—the maximum number of figures permitted outside China in a single exhibition.

Captivating the world since its discovery in 1974, the First Emperor’s tomb complex is one of the largest burial sites ever constructed. Estimated at nearly 250,000 square feet—or more than four American football fields—it includes a scale replica of the emperor’s imperial palace, complete with stables, offices, an armory and even a zoo. Ancient historians also described “flowing rivers” of mercury, of which trace amounts have recently been confirmed by scientists.

Perhaps most impressive are the estimated 8,000 terracotta figures excavated to date, including warriors of all ranks (all individually constructed, no two faces are alike), acrobats, musicians and horses. The tomb complex took 700,000 laborers nearly 40 years to build.

In 1994, the museum, then located in Golden Gate Park, was among the first to present the terracotta warriors to a U.S. audience. The 2013 exhibition offers a new generation of visitors the rare chance to view the clay figures up close. Visitors will also discover new secrets from the tomb, with more information than ever before on the First Emperor, his reign, and his quest for immortality.

“Celebrating 10 years in our Civic Center home calls for something extraordinary,” said Jay Xu, executive director, Asian Art Museum. “In China, history is being unearthed. Bringing a chapter of this epic story to San Francisco—with 10 life-size sculptures from one of the most significant discoveries of our time—is a great way to commemorate this occasion.”

EXHIBITION TICKETS: $8-$22
Advance tickets go on sale October 16, 2012
More info: www.asianart.org/terracotta-warriors