Posts Tagged ‘asian art museum’

Some Pig! – Our Asian Art Museum Invites You to Take a Photo with #HAPPYDRAGON by Artist #HungYi

Friday, June 10th, 2016

Thought it could have a been a pig

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…but I was wrong:

“Dragon on our steps? Don’t be alarmed! Here’s a peek at our newest friend, a VERY by artist 🌸🐲🌸

So now you can to go to McAllister and Larkin in Civic Center to take photos like this and this.

See it all at AsianArt.Org

The Biggest Bus in the World Promotes Our Asian Art Museum

Friday, May 13th, 2016

You can’t miss this

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105(!) Year Old Artist Tyrus Wong to be Honored at Asian Art Museum March 9th to Kick Off CAAMFest

Friday, March 4th, 2016

Oh look, it’s Disney Legend Tyrus Wong:

“The Center for Asian American Media Celebrates The Continued Legacy of Tyrus Wong With Signing of Rediscovered Painting

SAN FRANCISCO, March 4, 2016 – The Center for Asian American Media (CAAM), is thrilled to announce a truly endearing event taking place the day before CAAMFest 2016’s Opening Night presentation of the Bay Area premiere of TYRUS.

Tyrus Wong, the 105-year-old subject of TYRUS and pioneering icon whose art has touched millions through films like REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE and Disney’s BAMBI, will sign an original piece of his artwork that had been unidentified for decades. The painting was rediscovered by CAAM Board Member David Lei at the Chinese United Methodist Church in San Francisco’s Chinatown.

The event, hosted by CAAM, the Asian Art Museum and the Angel Island Immigration Station Foundation, will take place on Wednesday, March 9th, at 4:00PM in the Asian Art Museum’s Peterson Room, where San Francisco District 1 Supervisor Eric Mar will present a Tyrus Wong Day proclamation in honor of the artist.

Wong will be joined by his daughter, Kim, and TYRUS director, Pamela Tom. Tom’s award-winning documentary paints a beautifully intimate portrait of Wong, eloquently exploring his childhood arrival at the Angel Island Immigration Station, the evolution of his voice and legacy and the formation of what he views as his greatest achievement, his family.

The painting will be on display at the Asian Art Museum on Thursday, March 10th, for one day only. The public is invited to view the signed piece during regular museum hours and CAAMFest’s Opening Night Gala. Learn more at

Kim Wong, Pamela Tom and David Lei will be available for soundbites and photo opportunities. Press are invited to attend, and can RSVP to Larsen Associates at as space is limited.

About CAAMFest:
CAAMFest, formerly the San Francisco International Asian American Film Festival (SFIAAFF), takes placeMarch 1020, 2016 in the Bay Area. CAAMFest is a celebration of film, music, food and digital media from the world’s most innovative Asian and Asian American artists.

About CAAM:
CAAM (Center for Asian American Media) is a non-profit organization dedicated to presenting stories that convey the richness and diversity of Asian American experiences to the broadest audience possible. CAAM does this by funding, producing, distributing and exhibiting works in film, television and digital media. For more information on CAAM, please visit”


Friday, February 26th, 2016

I can’t think of a subject I know less about than art of the Islamic world in the 16th through 18th centuries, but check it out – this short, well-produced video is MESMERIZING:

Look at all the baubles for The Man With The Golden Gun. Bling bling! It’s as if Faberge made guns instead of eggs…

Of course, most of the exhibit is beyond my ken, but look what these people are saying:

‘Pearls on a String’ provides a glimpse of Islamic arts by Janos Gereben SF Performing Arts Examiner

Poets, Patrons and Artists at the Islamic Courts posted By Emily Wilson

Art: Pearls of the Orient by Jonathan Curiel

Now you’re up-to-speed.

Curator Qamar Adamjee introducing the exhibit with AAA Director Jay Xu:

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And here’s the geography:

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I’ll post some photos next week. In the meantime, see you there!

Pearls On a String: Artists, Patrons, and Poets at the Great Islamic Courts
Asian Art Museum, 200 Larkin, 10AM – 5PM Daily, Closed Mondays, Open Late on Thursdays

Seattle Had Its Spoon Man, But San Francisco Had Pigeon Man – Remembering Civic Center’s #1 Pigeon-Feeder of 2012

Thursday, July 24th, 2014

Forget about superwellknown Spoon Man from two decades back.

Just two years ago, San Francisco had its own icon – Pigeon Man.

All the pigeons of Civic Center knew Pigeon Man was coming – they’d walk with him down Larkin, Pied Piper-style. See?

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They used the crosswalk better than the average San Francisco pedestrian:

Here was the reward, some kind of grain, like what the Road Runner used to peck at:


“Art” Happens on McAllister Street – Colorful Origami Crane Birds Suddenly Appear on Our Asian Art Museum

Tuesday, July 16th, 2013

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Oh, and Membership at the Asian Art Museum / Chong-Moon Lee Center for Asian Art and Culture is cheaper than you might think…

Awesome Bronze Japanese Guardian Lions Installed at Our Asian Art Museum – Donated by Marsha Vargas Handley

Tuesday, May 14th, 2013

I missed the big installation yesterday but KTSF was there.

Check it.

Here’s what the “South Lion” looks like.  Its left paw is “resting on a Buddhist jewel with an openwork design of sculpted peonies, a flower closely associated with lions.” DNKT.

This is a composite shot, but it’s the best one I have now. Guardian lion, 1868-1912. Japan. Bronze. Gift of Marsha Vargas Handley in memory of Raymond G. Handley 

These critters certainly have found an appropriate resting place!

The ceremonial unveiling is coming soon.

All the deets from your Asian Art Museum:


The Asian Art Museum has installed two monumental Japanese bronze lion sculptures on granite plinths outside the museum’s front entrance on Larkin Street. Recently acquired by the museum through a donation from longtime supporter Marsha Vargas Handley in memory of Raymond G. Handley, the 800 lb. sculptures date to the late nineteenth century and are similar to the majestic guardian lions typically placed opposite each other outside Buddhist temples and Shinto shrines.

The practice of adorning public buildings with sculptures of lions is a time-honored custom in the US–the New York Public Library and the Art Institute of Chicago are noteworthy examples. The granite plinths outside the Asian Art Museum may well have been intended to support sculptures of lions when the building was originally built in 1916 to serve as the San Francisco Main Public Library. The museum is now following that longstanding tradition–this time with a uniquely Asian spin–giving a sneak peek of the treasures held inside.

The lion on the museum’s south side has its left paw resting on a Buddhist jewel, with an openwork design of sculpted peonies, a flower closely associated with lions. The south lion’s mouth is open, and the north lion’s is closed, symbolizing the sounds and spirit of the Japanese pronunciation of the first and last letters of the Sanskrit alphabet: “A” is pronounced with the mouth open, and “Un” with the mouth closed.

Physical Description: These lions’ enormous size—nearly five feet tall and six feet long— and standing positions are unusual. Paired guardian lions outside shrines today are often shown seated or crouching, and most are made of stone, wood, or, less commonly, ceramic. This pair of large sculptures also stands out in material (bronze). Relatively few bronze guardian lions from before World War II survive, due in part to mandatory metal collections ordered by the Japanese government during the war.

Conservation: The lions have undergone extensive conservation treatment, including repairs to the feet that fasten them to a new, customized base—a strategy of earthquake preparedness. Several layers of protective coating were applied to resist weathering of Ceremonial Unveiling: Details for a forthcoming ceremonial unveiling event will be announced soon.”

CRASH! Ginger Skaterboy Attacks MUNI Bus Stop Near City Hall – Broken Glass Everywhere – How #19 Polk Failed

Tuesday, May 7th, 2013

Here he is, in front of the Asian Art Museum.

Art student? I’m thinking art student with $19 headphones. Anyway…

…he’s the one who took out a huge panel of glass at the formerly famous* bus stop at McAllister and Larkin last week. There’s his weapon and there’s some of the glass he broke.

A modern-day warrior/Mean mean stride/ Today’s Tom Sawyer/ Mean mean pride:

Then, as twenty-odd people were staring at him, he yelled, “You should have stopped, Bitch!”

Indeed, a #19 Polk had just passed by him and a small crowd of fellow MUNI “passengers.”

Then, Dude sauntered up Polk, thusly:

How much does it cost Clear Channel / us to fix a glass panel at a MUNI bus stop? I know not.

$1000? $10,000?

On It Goes…

Exit the warrior, 
Today’s Tom Sawyer, 
He gets high on you, 
And the energy you trade, 
He gets right on to the friction of the day.

*Man-child Gavin Newsom had a press conference at the old bus stop at this location, back when urban farming was hot in the late-aughts. As seen from the CAAG’s Office, 355 McAllister:

OMG, They’re Here – China’s Terracotta Warriors are at Our Asian Art Museum Until May 27 – A Must See

Thursday, February 21st, 2013

This is it, this is history.

Get your tickets.


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Heh: Asian Art Museum “Loses” Terracotta Warrior – “2,112 Years Old, About 5’ 5” Tall, Mud-Colored, and Doesn’t Speak English”

Thursday, January 24th, 2013


“The Asian Art Museum needs your help. One of our terracotta warriors is lost, and we have to find him before China’s Terracotta Warriors: The First Emperor’s Legacy opens on February 22. What we know is this: a small group of terracotta warriors journeyed from their home in China to the museum—but somewhere along the way, this one took a wrong turn and is now missing. He’s 2,112 years old, about 5’ 5” tall, mud-colored, and doesn’t speak English.”

“If you spot him, please post a photo on Twitter, Instagram, or our Facebook wall and tag it with #LOSTWARRIOR so we can track his whereabouts on this map. Even if you don’t have photos, share and tag your tips and leads with #LOSTWARRIOR. Every little bit counts.
REWARD: Those who help may be eligible to win passes to the exhibition. Please spread the word, and thanks! Here’s our director Jay Xu with a personal call to action.