Posts Tagged ‘ban’

Seen Above Frisco: A Special Emirates A-380 with Wildlife Livery – Living with the Large Electronic Devices Ban

Tuesday, April 18th, 2017

Seen heading north, which is how you get to Dubai, more or less. And speaking of special, I think this is one of the higher weight versions, the better to make a 16-hour flight:

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1. So this explains the elephants and whatnot on the side.

2. And I don’t know what explains the electronics ban. Maybe it’s mostly protectionism.

And man, just look at that stubby jet. Compare with the twice-stretched Boeing 747:

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Since the A380 was built to be stretched, its wings are too big. If Airbus never ends up doing a cabin stretch, then the extra big wings will just be a waste. And that’s just part of the reason why the big A380 was more of an evolution rather than a revolution.

Anyway, it’s Euro tourist season now, so we have a lot of extra A380’s overhead. Happy Spring.

So Much For Frisco’s Oversize Vehicle Overnight Parking Ban on Fell Street – Still Life in Mobile Homes

Monday, August 22nd, 2016

This was the promise, back in aught-twelve:

In 2012 the San Francisco Board of Supervisors enacted a new violation in the SF Transportation Code to address inappropriate parking of oversized vehicles on city streets. SFTC Section 7.2.54 prohibits parking a vehicle over 22 feet in length or over 7 feet in height, or camp trailers, fifth-wheel travel trailers, house cars, trailer coaches, mobilehomes, recreational vehicles, or semi-trailers, between the hours of 12 a.m. and 6 a.m. when SFMTA signs are posted giving notice.

And yet this is the reality, in 2016. (I’ll note that the one in front has the brand-name “BRAVE” written on it in large letters – that’d certainly be true if the owner/renter planned to leave it there past midnight.)

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The millionaire homeowners of Fell wanted these rides gone from their view, but, well this is what they’re staring out when they walk down their stoops these days.

Of course this photo was made in the daytime, so maybe this caravan moves out every night to neighboring streets without the SFMTA ban? IDK, cause I’m sleeping during those hours, usually.

But actually, a ticket for just $110 sounds cheap compared with the cost of a tiny Airbnb apartment in the 94117 what could go for double that, easily, for one night.

I’ll have to do an RV nose count next time I’m skulking about the Panhandle after midnight…

Press Release: “Board of Supervisors President London Breed Introduces Toughest Styrofoam Ban Law in the Country”

Tuesday, April 19th, 2016

“Board of Supervisors President London Breed Introduces Toughest Styrofoam Ban Law in the Country

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
APRIL 19, 2016

SAN FRANCISCO— Board of Supervisors President London Breed today introduced legislation to create the most expansive Styrofoam prohibitions in the country including a ban on the sale of Styrofoam: 1) cups, plates, clamshells, meat trays, egg cartons, and other food ware; 2) packing materials, including packing peanuts; 3) coolers; 4) pool and beach toys; and 5) dock floats, buoys, and other marine products, as well as a ban on the use of Styrofoam packing material for items packaged in San Francisco.

“Three days before we celebrate the 47th Earth Day, I am excited to introduce some of the strongest environmental protection legislation in the country,” said President Breed. “We are a city prized for our natural beauty, surrounded by water on three sides. We have a moral, a public health, and frankly a financial responsibility to protect ourselves from pollutants like polystyrene foam.*”

Polystyrene cannot be recycled through San Francisco’s blue bin recycling collection program and essentially never decomposes. It is a significant source of litter on land and one of the most egregious elements of rising plastic pollution in the Bay and ocean.

Polystyrene breaks down into smaller, non-biodegradable pieces that seabirds often mistake for fish eggs. And unlike harder plastics, polystyrene contains a chemical used in its production called “styrene” that is metabolized after ingestion and threatens the entire food chain, including humans who eat contaminated marine wildlife. Styrene is linked to cancer and developmental disorders, and according to the US FDA, it leaches into food and drink from polystyrene food ware.

“The science is clear: this stuff is an environmental and public health pollutant, and we have to reduce its use,” said President Breed. “There are ample cost effective alternatives to Styrofoam on the market.”

More than 100 US cities have ordinances restricting polystyrene food service ware and/or packaging materials. San Francisco itself has prohibited serving food in polystyrene since 2007. President Breed’s legislation is the next step, covering new uses that have never been regulated in other cities.

“San Francisco will once again be at the forefront,” said President Breed. “We will replace hazardous products with compostable, recyclable ones. We will continue our work toward Zero Waste. And we will protect the public health and the natural beauty of our waterways and wildlife.”

President Breed worked closely with the San Francisco Department of the Environment, the nonprofit Sustainable San Francisco, the California Grocers Association, San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, as well as many local and international businesses. The legislation is designed to help businesses comply and accommodate those who cannot yet.
__________________________________________
*Styrofoam is actually a brand name for polystyrene foam.

This Rolling Billboard-on-Wheels Truck is Unstoppable – SFGov is Powerless to Regulate – Guess Which Amendment Protects Them

Friday, March 25th, 2016

That’s right, our First Amendment prevents local regulation, pretty much.

Read it and weep, Frisco!

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So there’s nothing to stop the crush of these orange Boost ads from circling and circling during rush hour.

Oh well

We would circle and we’d circle and we’d circle to stop and consider and centered on the pavement stacked up all the trucks jacked up and our wheels in slush and orange crush in pocket and all this here county, hell, any county, it’s just like heaven here, and I was remembering and I was just in a different county and all then this whirlybird that I headed for I had my goggles pulled off; I knew it all, I knew every back road and every truck stop…

 

Just 14 Points About Kara Swisher’s Fawning Interview / Prop F Victory Lap with Airbnb CEO Brian Chesky

Monday, November 30th, 2015

Here you go, a podcast from yesterday:

November 29, 2015 | Re/code Decode, hosted by Kara Swisher – Brian Chesky, Airbnb CEO; Holiday Gift Guide

“Airbnb CEO Brian Chesky talks with Kara Swisher about the attacks in Paris, raising “a couple billion” and the future of…”

Start at 14:00:

  1. No Airbnb, you can’t really say you had a recent “victory” in SF. A pyrrhic victory, maybe. (But your $8+ million helped to defeat Prop F, I’ll concede that.)
  2. “It’s hard to be a tech company in SF.” What on Earth does this mean? Why don’t you leave then, if things are so, so hard (but not really, not IRL) here?
  3. Oh, so using SF’s direct democracy ballot system when, as in this case, we have regulatory capture of the $F Democratic Party (and other$) is not only immature but “ridiculously immature?” Again, one wonders why Airbnb chose to come here to this horrible, horrible place.
  4. In regard to the “Airbnb Law,” didn’t Airbnb meet with then-Supervisor David Chiu something on the order of sixty (60) (!) times to craft regs as favorable to Airbnb as practically possible? I think so. Am I wrong on this? David Chiu was/is a partner of Airbnb, non? David Chiu is now in the Assembly thanks, in part, to Airbnb, non? So that’s what some people mean by the term Airbnb Law. (And incidentally, it was/is an unworkable mess, with a very low compliance rate, so far.)
  5. No, Airbnb, Prop F would not have “ban[ned] in-law units.”
  6. No, Airbnb, Prop F would not “have created a private right of action,” for the simple reason that Prop F didn’t pass and yet San Franciscans have a private right of action right now.
  7. Let’s stop now to ponder – does Kara Swisher know any of this stuff? She’s not up-to-speed, apparently, or she is and she wants to conduct a fawning interview. I’ll tell you, so far so good, KS. Mission accomplished.
  8. Does one need to be “against Airbnb” to approve of regulating Airbnb?
  9. “Even the San Francisco Chronicle…” I don’t know what this means. Was this editorial from the Publisher a surprise? Not at all. Also note that the Chron calls for changes to the regs cooked up by Airbnb and David Chiu…
  10. “[T]here’s this notion that we aren’t paying our share of taxes.” Well, here’s where that comes from. How much in hotel taxes should Airbnb have remitted as opposed to the mystery amount that it actually did – well, that’s not really knowable from outside of Airbnb.
  11. “We’re not jerks.” So why not explain what happened with the bus ads? Your choice, Airbnb. Are the people down in Socal who made the ads jerks? What did you do, just throw money around and say, oh don’t bother us, just make a contract with ClearChannel after you run it by a solitary Airbnber – that’ll be fine. We like surprises! And of course, this ad campaign was totally totally independent of anything having to do with Prop F. Of course.
  12. “Volunteers” knocking on 285,000 doors? Weren’t some of those “volunteers” actually paid, like with cash money? Yep. You want to get into this? We can get into this.
  13. Reference to “party houses.” I don’t think this issue was addressed. Or Airbnb Hotel, neither – these We Heart Airbnb podcast people didn’t have time to get into these things. I guess they were too busy with the “Holiday Gift Guide,” IDK.
  14. And what’s this – “I think the vast, vast majority of people are renting the homes they live in.” So what’s that as a number, is it 51%? IDK. Doesn’t Airbnb know this stat for San Francisco, like down to five significant digits? I think so. And how about this – most Airbnb units in SF are being rented out by people who rent out multiple Airbnb units. Is that true? Isn’t that a problem?

I think we’re at 24:00 now, so that’s ten minutes of audio for you to listen to.

(I don’t think I could have handled much more anyway.)

I leave you with this – here’s how one City Hall insider viewed things last summer:

“After Mayor Lee and the Board of Supervisors screwed up short-term rental legislation not once but twice, voters now face a choice: keep current law or replace it with Prop F. Those upset over “ballot box planning” should blame City Hall for not enacting the handful of changes that would have either prevented Prop F from going to the ballot or ensured its defeat.”

Airbnb don’t want no Prop F, so one assumes it’s all prepared for City Hall to take a fresh look at this regulatory mess (that Airbnb helped create) come 2016. Fine.

Oh, and just One More Thing:

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Sometimes when you win, you also lose…

Sugar, Irresistible Sugar, Relentless Sugar: On Sale Today in the 94132

Friday, July 17th, 2015

It’s twisted, huh?

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What’s This – Asiana Airlines is Actually Happy About Its Recent 45-Day Ban from SFO? And Its Stock Price is Up?

Monday, November 17th, 2014

Man, this recent report on Asiana Flight 214 from Anadolu Agency, the official press agency in Turkey(!), sure is informative – every line is pure gold.

Check it:

“We have two weeks to appeal and nothing is set in stone, but we are still considering what to do because to be honest we have got off light,” said the man, who did not wish to be named given the sensitivity of the case.

Well gee, this is true or somewhat true or not at all – how do you prove it? IDK. But man, this is not good for Asiana to have an employee/insider celebrating like this, for various reasons.

Three people died – one of them run over by a fire truck responding to the scene – and more than 180 of the 307 passengers and crew on board the Boeing 777 were injured when it clipped a sea wall and crashed into a runway at San Francisco airport on July 6 last year.

The SFFD gets a lot of criticism over its performance on that day, at least from outside of SF. (Here’s the rosier view from inside SF, FYI.)

United States National Transportation Safety Board officials have accused the pilots of mismanaging the landing due to a failure to manage speed and altitude, along with a reliance on an automatic throttle they didn’t fully understand.

Yep. It could be that it’s especially hard to learn on a modern Airbus and then switch over to the Boeing system. People should be looking into this…

“We can choose when to start the suspension, and if we do it during our off-peak season the damages will be greatly reduced,” he added.

Again, it’s OK to think this, but you shouldn’t come out and say this, IMO

The source said that he expected Korean Air – Asiana’s main rival – to be furious with the decision. As evidence, he highlighted that its services to Guam were stopped for more than four years after a 1997 crash claimed 228 lives, and that it was one of only two airlines that fly into South Korea’s Incheon International Airport that had refused to petition for leniency for Asiana – the other being its budget division Jin Air.

Sounds kind of petty, Korean Air.

Asiana had argued that suspensions had not been shown to improve safety.

Mmmm… I’m inclined to agree. I’m not sure about the effectiveness of this old school-style punishment.

The company’s stocks rallied on the local KOSPI bourse on Friday, rising 4.58 percent as the lighter-than-expected suspension was announced.

Did not know that.

You know, there are still a lot of stories to tell about Asiana 214. Like what about the people that received serious injuries – how are they doing?

On it goes…

A Modest Proposal: Let’s Ban Swimming at Ocean Beach, Let’s End the Carnage

Tuesday, May 27th, 2014

Now, let’s not ban surfing or kite-boarding or whathaveyou.

And oh, what about wading? Yes, that’s banned as well. How about above-the-knees as a demarcation betwixt wading and merely getting you feet wet.

Won’t the Feds need to be involved? Yes, sure, red tape, laws ‘n stuff – we could get around this if we tried, if we put our minds to it.

Won’t people violate the law? Sure, but that’s not the point. The point is that if sharks were eating people along this small stretch of beach every two, three, four, five, six months, like clockwork since forever, well, that would be international news. But when people die time and again, it’s like no big whoop.

Hey, do you know why we don’t have Baywatch-style lifeguard towers at Ocean Beach? Well, ’cause of the money, but also because the existence of the towers would send the message that swimming at Ocean Beach, and we don’t want to do that, right?

So we have these white pickups going back and forth, occasionally:

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So instead of the signage we have now in all those languages, after swimming gets banned we’ll have signs that simply say “SWIMMING BANNED” or whatever else it takes to get the message across.

Hey, you know what we’ve got that the visitors don’t got? We’ve got the lore, we’ve got the knowledge about this innocuous-appearing place being dangerous.

That means the onus is upon us.

One Weird Trick to Avoid Paying Ten Cents for a Paper Bag in SF – The Answer Will Amaze You: French Fries!

Monday, March 10th, 2014

Is this “french fries or onion rings” exception to the SF Checkout Bag Ordinance documented anywhere?

Check it:

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‘Cause I’m not seeing it. (Is there something in there about messy food?)

Anyway, order freedom fries or onion things if you want to stick it to the man and save money.

Official San Francisco Despises These “Rolling Billboard” Trucks, But Can’t Prevent Them From Circling and Circling

Thursday, December 5th, 2013

Especially in SoMA during convention time.

Why? Because of The Constitution. Or a constitution. Or one of them. Or both. (If a Scott Wiener-type really worked on this issue, it might have an effect, IDK.)

And oh yeah, these trucks all have Nevada license plates, ever more insulation from the long arm of SFGov

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Look for more of these trucks during next month’s “March of Life” 2014 on the Embarcadero

“We would circle and we’d circle and we’d circle to stop and consider and centered on the pavement stacked up all the trucks jacked up and our wheels in slush and orange crush in pocket and all this here county, hell, any county, it’s just like heaven here, and I was remembering and I was just in a different county and all then this whirlybird that I headed for I had my goggles pulled off; I knew it all, I knew every back road and every truck stop…”