Posts Tagged ‘bay area bicycle share’

The Toughest Job You’ll Never Love: Work for Ford / Bay Area Bike Share / Motivate for a Whopping $1 Above Minimum Wage

Thursday, March 30th, 2017

IDK, man. I still see more people sitting on locked up BABS bikes than people actually using them.

And how many millions have we spent on this program?

It’s making some people rich, but not its workers, not at, what, a nominal amount north of min wage?

Do you like bikes? Well, then why don’t we take all this money and simply give bikes away to residents? I mean, you know, as a mental exercise, something to think about. As things stand now, nobody really uses these rides ($9 minimum, ouch, so I’ve never even tried them, plus a nice $1200 charge on your credit card if you lose it, or in the event you have a hassle checking it back in and somebody steals it), but, somehow, this whole deal makes some people happy, and Ford (Motor Company) can get a Super Bowl ad snippet out of it, OK fine.

Anyway, have at it:

Bay Area Field Team Member (SOMA / south beach)
About Bay Area Bike Share
Bicycle sharing is a sustainable, healthy, and community-based transport option that enhances urban livability and mobility. Bay Area Motivate currently operates 700 bikes & 70 stations in the Bay Area with plans to expand the system — tenfold – with 7000 bikes by the end of 2018.

Overview of Position:
As a Field Team Member, you will play a fundamental role in Bay Area Motivate bike share operations. You will be responsible for maintaining the overall functionality and ride-ability of the Bay Area bike share system. Working under the primary guidance of the Operations Leadership Team, a Field Team Member will assist and support redistribution of bikes, maintain and repair all stations and related equipment, while supporting general bike share operations across the System.

TO APPLY: https://850.dayforcehcm.com/CandidatePortal/en-US/motivate/Posting/View/493

Primary Responsibilities and Essential Functions:
Redistribution
▪ Operate a large vehicle or bike train (large tricycle with cart) to redistribute bikes as required, based on real-time demand data
▪ Load/unload vehicles with bikes and dock/undock bikes at stations which requires repetitive motion and individual responsibility for lifting up to 50lbs
▪ Evaluate bike condition, document and record data regarding bikes and related equipment, and escalate if needed
▪ Communicate effectively and efficiently using verbal, written or typed communications with supervisors, managers and support related positions
▪ Partner and work collaboratively with Operations Leadership, fellow employees and related positions to assess, evaluate and determine inventory management and control
▪ Keep and maintain clean and presentable work areas, tools and equipment which may include, but is not limited to, company vehicles and work locations, at all times
▪ Perform bike valet duties including corralling and securing bikes, clearing stations, and helping customers

Station Maintenance, Appearance and Repair
▪ Complete station maintenance in a professional and timely manner consistent with all Bay Area Motivate (BAM) policies and procedures. Report any and all issues or concerns with Station performance to Deputy Operations Manager or designee.
▪ Ensure bike stations are operational which may require reboot of stations, replace station batteries, swap SD cards, and similar responsibilities as necessary
▪ Timely response to all station emergencies or identified issues, include tracking, recording and reporting all work orders

General Responsibilities
▪ Follow safe work practices and help create and maintain a safe work environment
▪ Follow any routes and assignments as delegated by dispatch and maintenance
▪ Communicate professionally and timely with all customers, management, vendors and employees
▪ Escalate issues as needed to Operations Management or designated Bay Area leader
▪ Work with all Motivate employees and team members to ensure timely and productive workflows
▪ Complete valet duties including corralling, securing and distributing bikes as needed
▪ Additional duties and responsibilities as determined by management.

Required Skills and Experience:
▪ Minimum 18 years of age or older.
▪ Valid Driver’s License and acceptable Motor Vehicle Record.
▪ Demonstrated success meeting and exceeding Bay Area Motivate performance expectations.
▪ Experience operating vehicles in congested city traffic.
▪ Knowledge of Bay Area geography and street layout.
▪ Proficiency with Microsoft Office and other technology as needed to perform the essential functions of the job
▪ Interpersonal skills — open to others’ ideas; patience and willingness to experiment and try new things while working collaboratively.
▪ Dependability and schedule adherence — ability and commitment to working all scheduled work hours. Bay Area Motivate work schedules may include, evenings, weekends and holidays.
▪ Ability to effectively and professionally communicate with management, co-workers, vendors and customers
▪ Ability to lift up to 50 pounds; stoop, bend, and stand for long periods of time.
▪ Willingness to work outdoors, year-round and in all weather conditions.

TO APPLY: https://850.dayforcehcm.com/CandidatePortal/en-US/motivate/Posting/View/493

The above description is not intended to be an exhaustive list of all duties, responsibilities, or qualifications associated with the job. From time to time, and related to the nature of work performed to accomplish Motivate’s Mission, employees may be required to perform duties outside of their normal responsibilities.

Motivate is proud to be an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer and strongly encourages applications from women, minorities, protected veterans and individuals with disabilities. Motivate is a drug-free workplace.

We thank all applicants in advance for their interest in this position, however, only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

Anti-Bicycling Sign on Rec and Park Property, Golden Gate Park

Monday, March 6th, 2017

Meesa thinks, “HOW WUDE!”

7J7C8135 copy

IDK how official these signs are. (Suppose they were ginned up by the RPD, but I didn’t see the typical coding letters what most SFGOV signs have.)

Anyway, such riding is not allowed, per KRON 4’s world-famous Stanley Roberts

Reverse Spin Class, Bike “-Share” Bike Rental, Market Street, USA

Tuesday, August 9th, 2016

I’ll tell you, I see more people sitting on these rides stationary without paying money than I see people riding these bikes with paying money.

7J7C9894 copy

Wow, pretty low Yelp score there, huh Bay Area Bike Share? Oh, what’s that, you don’t care, because you’re a millionaire lady with a fat government contract? OK fine.

Anyway, this guy was spinning backwards – that’s a first for me. Sometimes people don’t spin at all – they just talk on the phone, or play the Candy Crush or whathaveyou as I roll by on my $96 Walmart bike, which, you know, we could just buy for and give away free to all residents of Frisco who wanted one, for cheaper than what we spend, year in and year out, forever, on the Bay Area Bike Rental Share.

Oh well.

PRIDEBIKE Sighting, June 2016

Monday, June 20th, 2016

Or I should say #PRIDEBIKE in this Age of Instagram:

7J7C7469 copy

All the deets on this rainbow bicycle from BABS (Bay Area Bike Rental), which is, you know, striving to become popular

Government-Subsidized “BAY AREA BIKE SHARE” Tries to Rip Off Tourist for $300, Only Steals $150 – When Will BABS Solve This Repeated Issue?

Monday, November 16th, 2015

Suffer Fabian:

“Wow, watch out guys, especially tourists, that’s a total rip-off! Wrongly assumed it would be like bike share services in Europe, 30 minutes free of charge and for a day pass (i.e. renting the bike for the day) would cost me 9$. Took 2 bikes for 2 days for my girlfriend and me thinking I would at the end cost me something like $36 – which sounds reasonable for those heavy, sometimes poorly maintained bikes. They charged me at the end more than $300! Ridiculous. Cannot see how this is a sustainable service. Ended up paying half after intense discussions which is some relief, however for $150 I could have rented out 2 high-end mountain bikes for that price.”

Here’s what the tourists see:

Capturefsfddd

I know there are more words around this image, but I’m just telling you what the tourists see.

Is BABS aware of this issue? Yes, but it just doesn’t give a fuck. They’re all like “fuck you, pay me,” or actually, they’re like oh, well, just pay half then. That’s the deal – get charged waaaaay too much money by mistake and then talk your way down to 50% of the overcharge. It’s like a unwritten BABS policy now.

And believe it or not, BABS would have only a 1.5 star Yelp rating but for its hectoring of customers who dare give it a one-star review, and but for the shill 5 star reviews.

It goes on and on:

I’m giving one star because the quality and condition of the bikes is absolutely horrible. All the bikes are heavy pieces of junk! Forget investing in more docking stations Bay Area bike share, invest in better bikes!! I’ve been to many cities around the world and all the bikes there looks way better than the ones we have here.

Perhaps BABS deserves its abysmal two-star Yelp rating?

Bay Area Bike Share Debuts Today at a Cost of $16K Per Bicycle, So Far

Thursday, August 29th, 2013

“Bay Area Bike Share debuts today

System goes live with 700 bikes at 70 stations in five cities

SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 29, 2013 — The Bay Area Air Quality Management District, the Metropolitan Transportation Commission and its project partners today announce the launch of the Bay Area Bike Share pilot program. Beginning today, the public will have access to shared bicycles 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at specific locations within the cities of San Francisco, Redwood City, Palo Alto, Mountain View and San Jose.

(Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130829/SF71644)

The Bay Area Bike Share pilot is a part of the MTC’s Initiatives Program and the Air District’s Transportation Fund for Clean Air program, which tests innovative projects for their ability to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from transportation.  The Air District initiated this effort in 2010 and has contributed $2.8 million to launch this project.  Touted as a “last mile solution”, the goal of the bike sharing pilot program is to make it more convenient for Bay Area residents to take public transit without taking their own bike on the system, and then use bike share bicycles to reach their final destination resulting in reduced air pollution in the areas served.

The cost of the full pilot totals $11.2 million, and is funded using Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality ($7.1 million), Transportation Fund for Clean Air ($2.8 million) and other local funds ($1.3 million). The program is managed by the Air District in partnership with MTC and local partners.

“We’re excited to announce the launch of this pioneering regional bike share program,” said Jack Broadbent, executive officer of the Air District.  “This system brings it all together and makes connecting from public transportation to the workplace or other destination simple, convenient and fun.”

Membership rates to join Bay Area Bike Share are $88 for an annual pass, $22 for a three-day pass and $9 for a daily pass. Each pass provides for unlimited trips during the membership period, with no additional cost for the first 30 minutes of each trip. Trips that exceed 30 minutes will incur surcharges. Annual memberships are available for sale at www.bayareabikeshare.com.

“The launch of Bay Area Bike Share is the first step in our city’s efforts to build a world-class bike share system for San Francisco,” said San Francisco Mayor Edwin M. Lee. “Bay Area Bike Share will give San Francisco’s residents and visitors access to a bike when they want one. It’s an easy, convenient, affordable and healthy transportation option that we’re eager to add to our transportation network, and we look forward to seeing Bay Area Bike Share transform the way we move around San Francisco.”

The pilot will launch in two phases. The first phase is deploying today, August 29, 2013, with 700 bikes. For the second phase of the pilot, it is anticipated that 300 additional bikes and 30 kiosks will be added in the first quarter 2014 to reach the full pilot complement of 1,000 bikes and 100 stations.

“We are excited to participate in the Bay Area Bike Share pilot program and offer San Jose residents another convenient way to get around downtown and to/from our public transit hubs,” Mayor Chuck Reed said. “This type of program has the potential to get more cars off the road, reduce traffic congestion and promote a healthier and more vibrant community.”

The kiosk stations are located near transit hubs, high-density residential areas and key destination points such as employment centers and universities, making it easier to quickly and conveniently connect to and from transit and to make short-distance trips by bike.  Bike sharing will also help to reduce the need to take bikes on board regional and local transit – relieving congestion on those systems.

“Bicycles are a great way to attract new customers who now find transit is an option for them to cover the long distances from the train or the bus to their office. And it allows them to skip a transfer to other systems to reach their destinations,” said Michael J. Scanlon, CEO/general manager for the San Mateo County Transit District. “Bikeshare provides an option for transit operators who struggle to provide enough bicycle capacity and an incentive for new riders to take advantage of commute alternatives.”

In addition to the Air District and MTC, the pilot project is a partnership among local government agencies including the City and County of San Francisco, SamTrans, Caltrain, the County of San Mateo, the City of Redwood City and the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority.

In the Bay Area, the transportation sector accounts for more than 50 percent of overall air pollution. Significant emission reductions from the transportation sector will help the Bay Area attain and maintain state and national air quality standards and reduce greenhouse gases.

Bay Area residents and visitors can learn more about the bike share system at www.bayareabikeshare.com,facebook.com/bayareabikeshare and sfbayareabikeshare (twitter).

The Bay Area Air Quality Management District is the regional agency responsible for protecting air quality in the nine-county Bay Area. For more information, visit www.baaqmd.gov.

MTC is the transportation planning, coordinating and financing agency for the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area, and operates the region’s 511 traveler information system.

The project partners who have joined together to launch this effort include:

Air District          Caltrain

MTC                   The County of San Mateo

City and Co. of SF    The City of Redwood City

SamTrans               Santa Clara Valley
Transportation Authority
SOURCE  The Bay Area Air Quality Management District

Photo:http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130829/SF71644
http://photoarchive.ap.org/
The Bay Area Air Quality Management District

CONTACT: Ralph Borrmann, 415.749.4900, MTC Contact: John Goodwin, 510-817-5862

Web Site: http://bayareabikeshare.com