Posts Tagged ‘bay area’

Something New: Checkpoint Charlie Atop Twin Peaks – SFPD “Community Policing” of a Sort

Saturday, July 22nd, 2017

I’ve been up to Twin Peaks seven days out of the past eight – this is the first I’ve seen anything like this:

There was an SFPD presence up here even before the killing of last week, but it has stepped up quite a bit now.

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VIDEO: San Francisco police step up patrols on Twin Peaks after 71-year-old man murdered by thieves

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City Attorney Dennis Herrera Seeks Court Orders Requiring Uber and Lyft to Follow the Law

Friday, July 21st, 2017

IMO:

  • I’m not sure if it’s the job of the City Attorney to “strike the right balance” betwixt UBER / Lyft convenience vs. traffic congestion.
  • This Travis Kalanick sentence is the highlight: “I had hoped with the changes to its leadership that Uber had reformed its corporate culture.” Not necessarily sarcastic, but it has a bite nevertheless.
  • If a San Francisco taxi driver tells you to get lost because s/he doesn’t want to take you all the way out to the Sunset (which would make money for the driver, just maybe not as much as expected, or as average) or says, “I don’t take people to the Potrero projects,” well that’s a misdemeanor called Failure to Convey. IDK if is this kind of law applies to UBER Lyfters right now. Anyway, that’s what they’re getting at with the talk of discrimination.
  • Oh, and the reason why UBER started here in the Frisco bay first has to do with longstanding SFMTA policies of taxi regulation. Late night ballers such as Travis K had a bear of a time getting home at night – at 2:00 AM on a weekend night sometimes you’d see hundreds of people within a block of Broadway / Columbus with their arms up trying hail a cab. This had to do with a taxi shortage what valued certain people more than the general taxi riding public.

JMO

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Anyway, just released:

Herrera seeks court orders requiring Uber and Lyft to follow the law – Herrera moves for court to enforce his subpoenas requiring Uber, Lyft to turn over records on safety, disability access and operations

SAN FRANCISCO (July 21, 2017) — City Attorney Dennis Herrera announced today that he is requesting court orders to compel Lyft, Uber and two Uber subsidiaries to comply with subpoenas issued on June 5, 2017.  The subpoenas were issued as part of the City Attorney’s investigation into whether ride-hailing companies are creating a public nuisance in San Francisco.

Herrera today filed petitions in San Francisco Superior Court seeking a court order requiring the companies to comply with the subpoenas. The subpoenas are aimed at ensuring Uber and Lyft’s estimated 45,000 drivers in San Francisco do not create a public nuisance by jeopardizing public safety, discriminating or otherwise violating local and state laws.

The administrative subpoenas seek four years of records in eight categories, including miles and hours logged by drivers, incentives that encourage drivers to “commute” to San Francisco from as far away as Fresno or Los Angeles, driver guidance and training, accessible vehicle information, and the routes taken by these drivers in San Francisco.

Herrera is turning to the courts after giving the companies multiple opportunities to comply with the subpoenas.

“Unfortunately, Uber is doing what it always seems to do: raise obstacles and drag its feet— all while continuing to flout the law,” Herrera said. “To its credit, Lyft was more responsive, but in the end they also raised unreasonable roadblocks. They provided a minimal amount of documents before deciding not to comply with the rest of our request. And they have so far failed to execute a confidentiality agreement that would protect any legitimate trade secrets.  From the beginning, we have been clear that the companies must comply with these subpoenas.  These motions are the next step in protecting the rights of the people who live and work in San Francisco.”

On June 22 Herrera won a court ruling requiring Uber to comply with a separate subpoena from Treasurer José Cisneros to help ensure that Uber drivers have business licenses. The court found Uber’s arguments unpersuasive in that case.

San Franciscans and city leaders alike are concerned with public nuisance, public safety, accessibility, discrimination, compensation and other issues arising from the explosive growth of companies like Uber and Lyft.  Herrera issued his subpoenas as he investigates these issues.  He has also requested information about congestion and environmental impacts.

“The status quo is not working,” Herrera said.  “There’s no question that Uber and Lyft offer convenience.  But convenience for some cannot trump the rights of every San Francisco resident and visitor, including the safe enjoyment of our roads and bike lanes. I’m trying to strike the right balance here.  ”

After the subpoenas were issued, Lyft contacted the City Attorney’s Office and worked with the city to try to craft a confidentiality agreement that complies with the subpoena and with public records law, while also protecting trade secrets from public disclosure.  Lyft ultimately was not willing to move forward with a satisfactory agreement, demanding unreasonable provisions.

Uber objected to the subpoenas and refused to produce any documents or data at all. It waited until the June 20 deadline to send a letter telling the city it was declining to produce the information but would be available to “meet and confer regarding Uber’s concerns.”  After that, Uber representatives were slow to meet, late to respond and then non-committal. They have failed to comply with the subpoena.

“Uber was stalling,” Herrera said.  “I had hoped with the changes to its leadership that Uber had reformed its corporate culture. So far, that doesn’t seem to be the case. Both Uber and Lyft were given ample opportunity to follow the law. They chose not to, so now we’re in court.”

Additional documentation from the case is available on the City Attorney’s website at:https://www.sfcityattorney.org/

Victim-Blaming, SFGov-Style

Friday, July 21st, 2017

A daytime theft, a few days back, under the pouring sun:

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(This is a little more disturbing than most, as this fam had pretty obviously just parked it there and the discarded hoodie hanging down there indicates a hasty getaway, or else somebody like Charles Manson (ex 636 Cole) came by to stage the crime scene, as was his thing.)

Anyway, this wave of car break-ins used to be a problem for the City and County of San Francisco, but they put up this sign, right across the street, last year (as you can see by the 3/16 at the bottom there):

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And that took care of that.

MISSION ACCOMPLISHED.

Two Words: Walmart Interns – Here’s Team 2017 in Frisco

Friday, July 21st, 2017

Let’s say they’re Quality Engineering Interns from SAN BRUNO, CA:

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Man, Walmart’s coming to Frisco, man. Sooner or later. Amazon’s here, right? Target didn’t used to be here, but now it is, right? And Lowe’s?

Anyway, I’m used to seeing Gap ‘Nana Navy interns exploring our town in packs ‘n stuff, but I never thought I’d see Walmart interns in the 415.

SoMA Costco Update: When Your Comfort Animal Needs Its Own Comfort Animal

Friday, July 21st, 2017

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Your 50th Anniversary SUMMER OF LOVE EXPERIENCE is Ending Soon – Catch It by August 20th, 2017

Friday, July 21st, 2017

At our de Young Museum in Golden Gate Park.

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I liked it.

All the deets.

This Expensive Tesla Model S Lacks a Front License Plate, Yet It’s Legal – One Simple Trick

Thursday, July 20th, 2017

So a certain kind of person doesn’t like front license plates, even though Cali is a Front License Plate State. Why, because it mars “the look” of their Porsche, Mercedes, BMW, Audi and/or Tesla. You know some of these people, Gentle Reader. I guarantee it.

Anyway, a subset of this group this is the cohort what takes years to put on their rear license plates, because, IDK, freedom? Because they don’t want to pay bridge tolls? Because they don’t want their, uh, affairs looked into by pesky family attorneys down the road? Because they want their rides to appear “brand new?” IDK.

And a subset of that group are those who drive around without plates but with an 11-99 CHP Foundation / Please Don’t Cite Me For Speeding Because I’m One Of The Good Guys license plate holder.

So that was the wind-up and now here’s the pitch. What kind of illegal behavior is this?

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Surprise! An MFG plate, for MANUFACTURING. And that means that Tesla can send out prototypes or whatever without an FLP

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See?

Manufacturers

vehicle manufacturers license platevehicle manufacturers license platevehicle manufacturers license plate

vehicle manufacturers license platevehicle manufacturers license platevehicle manufacturers license plate

Exclusions: Cannot be used on service vehicles. Only one plate is required on the vehicle.

Statutory Authority: §§9262, 11715

Nice and legal.

🌈

Falun Gong Practicing Atop Twin Peaks – And Lobbying the Tourists

Thursday, July 20th, 2017

Haven’t seen this afore:

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Everybody’s doing it, if you’ll notice:
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It’s quite a scene up there, sometimes:

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My Two San Francisco Skunk Sightings: 1) Japanese Tea Garden, 2004; and 2) Mount Sutro, Yesterday

Thursday, July 20th, 2017

From back before the time our Japanese Tea Garden cut down its free hours by about 90% – this was at about 7:00 PM or so, in 2004:

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And here’s yesterday up in UCSF’s so-called cloud* forest:

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That shot was as I was leaving – it was the only time this critter looked at me. It was busy digging along a line. It looked like it was farming or something.

And here’s the other shot, with its hair akimbo, like Robert Smith of The Cure. This animal needs some product:

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It wasn’t threatening me or anything, it was just digging away.

(Of course, I’ve seen more coyotes, foxes and raccoons in Frisco. Skunks is rare.)

In closing, Disintegration is the best album ever.

*Not a forest and not a cloud forest. If you want to call it a stand of exotic trees in a sometimes foggy area, then we can agree. 

MANSPLAINER: Flashing Lights and Sirens Don’t Mean PULL TO THE RIGHT AND STOP, They Mean GET OUT OF THE WAY

Wednesday, July 19th, 2017

What does the DMV have to say about this situation? IDK, I forget.

But I’m talking IRL here. And in real life these two drivers teamed up to block this fire truck from turning right for a little while. The right-side driver, who definitely heard the sirens whilst driving the entire block, could have easily stopped mid-block and thereby have left room for the SFFD:

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You gotta try to think of what the fire truck driver wants you to do, which is get outta the way, as opposed to what you did, which is slowly drive to the end of the block and stop.

Of course, this isn’t the end of the world – I’m just a dude here ‘splaining things without being asked to…