Posts Tagged ‘Beth Lisick’

OMG, David Eggers is Coming! David Eggers is Coming This Thursday to Our Main Library – It’s One City One Book 2010

Tuesday, October 12th, 2010

Our San Francisco Public Library invites you to a talk by author Dave Eggers, at the Koret Auditorium in the S.F. Main Library. It’s a part of One City One Book 2010:

Dave Eggers will be in conversation with humorist/writer Beth Lisick on Thursday, Oct. 14, starting at 6 p.m. He’ll be talking about his book, Zeitoun, the One City One Book selection for 2010. The event is at the San Francisco Main Library, 100 Larkin Street, San Francisco, in the Koret Auditorium. It’s one of the few chances to hear Dave live and for free. There will be no taping of this event, so it’s the only chance to see him.”

Check it out:

The San Francisco Public Library invites San Franciscans to participate in the 6th annual One City One Book: San Francisco Reads program, by announcing the selection of Zeitoun by Dave Eggers.

“The One City One Book program strives to provide a book that is thought provoking and illuminating for our diverse residents while uniting us in a common literary effort,” said City Librarian Luis Herrera. “The selection of San Francisco writer Dave Eggers’ book about a family in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina brings forth important issues about communities in the wake of disaster that is sure to resonate with readers citywide.”

Eggers’ nonfiction book is about Abdulrahman Zeitoun, a prosperous Syrian-American father of four, who chose to stay in New Orleans when Hurricane Katrina struck to protect his house and his contracting business. In the days that followed, he traveled the flooded streets in a secondhand canoe, passing on supplies and helping those he could.
 
 Eggers’s riveting nonfiction book, three years in the making, explores Zeitoun’s roots in Syria, his marriage to Kathy—an American who converted to Islam—and their children, and the surreal atmosphere (in New Orleans and the U.S., in general) in which what happened to Abdulrahman Zeitoun became possible. Zeitoun was written in close collaboration with its subjects and involved vast research—in the U.S., Spain, and Syria.
 
This true story is a page turner that is sure to engage readers this summer and the Library encourages them to participate in informative programs in September and October.

Ever more deets, after the jump

(more…)

S.F. Public Library Announces “Zeitoun” by Dave Eggers as “One City One Book” Selection for 2010

Monday, August 2nd, 2010

Our San Francisco Public Library has just announced its pick for One City One Book 2010. All the deets are below.

(Pretty soon, all of San Francisco will be one giant book discussion group, so don’t get left behind.)

And best of all, you can look forward to a talk by author Dave Eggers, in conversation with Beth Lisick, in the Koret Auditorium at the Main Library on Oct. 14, 2010.

Check it out:

The San Francisco Public Library invites San Franciscans to participate in the 6th annual One City One Book: San Francisco Reads program, by announcing the selection of Zeitoun by Dave Eggers.

“The One City One Book program strives to provide a book that is thought provoking and illuminating for our diverse residents while uniting us in a common literary effort,” said City Librarian Luis Herrera. “The selection of San Francisco writer Dave Eggers’ book about a family in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina brings forth important issues about communities in the wake of disaster that is sure to resonate with readers citywide.”

Eggers’ nonfiction book is about Abdulrahman Zeitoun, a prosperous Syrian-American father of four, who chose to stay in New Orleans when Hurricane Katrina struck to protect his house and his contracting business. In the days that followed, he traveled the flooded streets in a secondhand canoe, passing on supplies and helping those he could.
 
 Eggers’s riveting nonfiction book, three years in the making, explores Zeitoun’s roots in Syria, his marriage to Kathy—an American who converted to Islam—and their children, and the surreal atmosphere (in New Orleans and the U.S., in general) in which what happened to Abdulrahman Zeitoun became possible. Zeitoun was written in close collaboration with its subjects and involved vast research—in the U.S., Spain, and Syria.
 
This true story is a page turner that is sure to engage readers this summer and the Library encourages them to participate in informative programs in September and October.

Ever more deets, after the jump

(more…)

San Francisco Public Library Wins Award and Cash for 2009 Fine Amnesty Program

Wednesday, June 30th, 2010

Remember last year when Captain Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger and others participated in the San Francisco Public Library’s fine amnesty program? Well, it was such a success that the SFPL just got an award.

And, bonus, the Presidio Branch Library got back a 1947 print of George Bernard Shaw’s Man and Superman. It was 45 years overdue.

Remember, give a hoot, read a book!

All the deets:

San Francisco Public Library Receives National John Cotton Dana Award at American Library Association Annual Conference
 
Recognition for 2009’s Fine Amnesty Program, “Return the Books”
 
The San Francisco Public Library was one of six libraries nationwide to be honored with a John Cotton Dana Public Relations Award Sunday at the annual American Library Association (ALA) Conference in Washington D.C. The award recognizes and honors outstanding achievement in library public relations.

SFPL was recognized for its 2009 Overdue Fine Amnesty Program campaign, “Return the Books,” which led to the recovery of 29,000-plus items, valued at approximately $730,000, over the two week amnesty period in May 2009.

The low-cost, multifaceted overdue fine amnesty campaign used the tagline, “What’s Your Excuse?” and obtained free participation by local and national personalities including Captain Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger, Josh Kornbluth, Beth Lisick, W. Kamau Bell, and Marga Gomez, each offering clever excuses in a series of television public service announcements about their excuses for not returning library materials. The campaign netted a 23.6 percent return on overdue materials.

The fine amnesty program was intended to help library patrons cope with the economic downturn by removing one obstacle – overdue fines –allowing them to resume using library resources. The total number of recovered items was 29,228, including 3,151 books that were more than 60 days overdue and were therefore “assumed lost” or unlikely to be returned. The value of those long overdue items was nearly $79,000. Among the older items returned was a copy ofGeorge Bernard Shaw’s Man and Superman (reprinted 1947) with a due date stamp of Jan. 29, 1964, making it more than 45 years overdue from the  Presidio Branch Library. San Francisco library patrons also saved themselves $55,165 in overdue materials fines and more than 3,000 patrons were able to obtain a clean slate on their record.

The John Cotton Dana Public Relations Award, which has been awarded since 1946, is sponsored by the H.W. Wilson Company, the H.W. Wilson Foundation and the Library Leadership and Management Association (LLAMA), a division of the American Library Association (ALA). It is considered to be the most prestigious of all library awards in the field of public relations. The award comes with a $5,000 prize which is being returned to the City to help offset the general fund costs from foregoing the overdue fines over the two-week amnesty period.