Posts Tagged ‘bike’

Frisco’s Tallest Bike – HAPPY SUKKOT from Chabad of Cole Valley

Monday, October 24th, 2016

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Distracted Riding

Tuesday, October 18th, 2016

Maybe texting, maybe not texting – I didn’t see him texting anyway.

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And, as the sheep in Animal Farm used to say, One Earpod Good, Two Earpods Baaaad.

Balboa Dip, Two Angles

Tuesday, October 18th, 2016

Who says The Richmond is boring?

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This is, and has been, a thing – see?

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Hey, should these two blocks be on the Strava? Well, since there’re stop signs at the bottom of the dip, the answer is NO. Unless the “King of the Mountain” can actually stop, wait for any cross traffic to clear and then climb up to the next intersection in just 13 seconds…

If only Strava had more lawyer-advisors, you know, instead of the lawyer-investors, then Strava might look at this issue differently…

Walmart has a Deal for You: A Mountain Bike with Disk Brakes for Just $77

Monday, October 17th, 2016

Did I say disc brakes? I meant to say disc brake, as there’s only one on this ride – a setup I’ve never seen before:

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I’m sure this ride is a little heavy, but you can’t beat $77.

I’ll have to tell you about these kinds of bikes, sometime…

The UPSHIFT Car Rental Delivery Service is On The Road in Frisco

Thursday, October 13th, 2016

I hadn’t thought of this new biz for a couple years, but now here it is, spotted in the wilds of the Financh:

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I guess Bro here just drove a rental Prius to somebody’s home, took out his Bianchi and is now heading home? I think that’s how things work.

Market Street: Where Parking Your Bike “For Just Five Minutes” Turns Into Five Days, and Then Maybe Five Weeks

Thursday, October 13th, 2016

That’s what everybody says, that they parked their bike for just five minutes and then when they came back it had been ripped off. Then the owner gives up and leaves the carcass there and then we have this, for day after day:

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A quarter century ago, there were fewer bike thieves in Frisco, and they’d endeavor to steal your whole bike, instead of just parts off of your bike. It was a better era.

Anywho, if you took this mess into a Local Bike Shop, they might tell you to make an appointment, I’m srsly. And then they’d tell you that you’d be better off buying a whole new bike, most likely.

On It Goes…

The 94117 is Mad Max but with Bike Parts Instead of Cars

Friday, October 7th, 2016

The Burley trailer for your twins what was stolen out of your garage in Cole Valley has been repurposed.

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No tires necessary, just run them on the rims…

Trek Factory Racing? – Holy Toledo – As Seen in Frisco’s Financh

Wednesday, October 5th, 2016

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A Crazy New SFMTA Plan to Allow Bike Riders to Run Red Lights on Fell and Oak in the “Panhandle-Adjacent” Area

Tuesday, October 4th, 2016

Here it is: The “Fell and Oak Streets Panhandle-Adjacent Bikeway Feasibility Study”

The basic idea is to take out one of the four lanes of Fell and one of the four lanes of Oak along the Golden Gate Park Panhandle from the Baker Street DMV to Stanyan and turn them into dedicated bike lanes.

You don’t need to even look at the report to know that this idea is “feasible” – obviously, our SFMTA can do this if it wants to:

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But why does the SFMTA want to do this? This is not stated in the report.

As things stand now, you can ride your bike on the left side of the left lanes of Fell and Oak, or on the right sides of the right lanes of Fell and Oak, or in any part of any lane of Fell and Oak if you’re keeping up with traffic (but this is especially hard to do heading uphill on Fell), or on the “multi-use pathway” (what I and most people call the bike path) what winds through the Panhandle.

So, why not widen the bike path again, SFGov? It used to be 8 foot wide and now it’s 12 foot wide, so why not go for 16 foot wide? (Hey, why doesn’t our SFMTA simply take over Rec and Park? You know it wants to.)

My point is that it would also be “feasible” to somehow force RPD to widen the current bike path (and also the extremely bumpy, injury-inducing Panhandle jogging/walking path along Oak) independent of whatever the SFMTA wants to do to the streets.

Anyway, here’s the news – check out page 12 of 13. No bike rider (or what term should I use this year, “person with bikes?” Or “person with bike?” Or “person with a bike?”) is going to want to sit at a red light at a “minor street” when s/he could just use the bike trail the SFTMA figures, so why not just allow them to ride on Fell and Oak without having to worry about traffic lights at all? And the pedestrians? Well, you’ll see:

“Minor Street Intersections

The minor cross-streets in the project area from east to west are Lyon Street, Central Avenue, Ashbury Street, Clayton Street, Cole Street, and Shrader Street. Each is a consistent width of 38’-9” curb-to-curb with 15-foot wide sidewalks. All of these streets are discontinued [Fuck man. How much colledge do you need to start talking like this, just asking] at the park, each forming a pair of “T” intersections at Oak and Fell streets. The preferred control for the protected bike lane at these “T” intersections is to exclude it from the traffic signal, allowing bicyclists to proceed through the intersection without stopping unless a pedestrian is crossing the bikeway. Due to the relatively low pedestrian volumes at these intersections, it is expected that people using the protected bike lane [aka cyclists? aka bike riders?] would routinely violate the signal if required to stop during every pedestrian phase, creating unpredictability and likely conflict between users on foot and on bicycles. This treatment also recognizes that in order to attract many bicycle commuters, the new protected bike lanes would need to be time-competitive with the existing multi-use path that has the advantage of a single traffic control signal for the length of the Panhandle.

Excluding the protected bike lane from the traffic signal requires installing new pedestrian refuge islands in the shadow of the parking strip. The existing vehicle and pedestrian signal heads currently located within the park would also need to be relocated to new poles on the pedestrian refuge islands.

Implementing these changes would cost between $70,000 and $150,000 per intersection, and require the removal of approximately four parking spaces per intersection. Over the eleven minor-street “T” intersections along the Panhandle (excluding Fell Street/Shrader Street which which has been discussed separately), the total cost would be between $0.9 and $1.5 million dollars and approximately 48 parking spaces would be removed.

This design introduces a variety of benefits and compromises [“compromises!” Or maybe “costs,” as in a cost/benefit analysis?] for pedestrians crossing to and from the park at the minor intersections:

Pedestrians would be required to wait for gaps in bicycle traffic to cross the protected bike lane (which may present new challenges to people with low or no vision). Design treatments for the protected bike lanes (e.g., stencil messages, rumble strips, signs) should also be considered to clearly indicate the necessity of yielding to pedestrians to people on bicycles.”

Frisco Traffic: Shirtless Recumbent and All-Electric Scooter

Wednesday, September 28th, 2016

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