Posts Tagged ‘bikes’

FordGoBike Goes Electric: Ford Motor Company’s GoBike “Bikeshare” Rental Scheme to Expand with Battery-Assist Bicycles in April 2018

Monday, January 8th, 2018

Pretty soon it won’t be so hard to pedal up our 48 hills on a heavy, clunky GoBike rental

See all the deets in this just-released press release:

 “Motivate will launch a pilot program adding 250 Ford GoBike-branded GenZe electric bicycles to its bikeshare fleet in San Francisco, beginning April 2018. (Photo: Business Wire)

SAN FRANCISCO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Motivate International, the operator of the Bay Area’s regional bike share system, announced today it will add e-Bikes to its fleet, beginning with 250 e-Bikes in San Francisco this April. The pedal-assist e-Bikes, produced by Silicon Valley-based GenZe, will help riders by boosting their natural pedal power, so they can get up hills more easily and ride for longer distances. This new offering will integrate seamlessly with the Ford GoBike network and add a safe, reliable and affordable shared mobility option to the city.

“We believe e-Bikes will be a game-changer for the San Francisco bikeshare experience, vastly improving accessibility and rideability. All kinds of riders, no matter their fitness or riding level, will be able to zoom up hills and zip around the city.”

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“Our shared e-Bike is the newest product in our pipeline of innovative, sustainable mobility solutions,” said Jay Walder, CEO of Motivate. “We believe e-Bikes will be a game-changer for the San Francisco bikeshare experience, vastly improving accessibility and rideability. All kinds of riders, no matter their fitness or riding level, will be able to zoom up hills and zip around the city.”

“E-Bikes will give Bay Area residents and visitors one more option when traveling around San Francisco, which will help to make San Francisco more livable and reduce congestion and household transportation costs. We look forward to the expansion of the Ford GoBike e-Bike pilot to the other Ford GoBike cities,” said Alix Bockleman, deputy executive director for policy at the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC), the regional governmental agency that partners with Motivate to bring bike sharing to the Bay Area. MTC also manages the Bay Area’s Clipper® card, which can now be used to unlock Ford GoBike.

“In many ways, e-Bikes are ideal for bikeshare programs because they make local, short-distance cycling easier for people,” said Vish Palekar, CEO of GenZe. “Our e-Bikes can go anywhere a conventional bicycle can go, including shared lanes and cycling paths – allowing riders to commute greater distances with no traffic and zero emissions. We’re excited to be a part of this innovative bikeshare initiative, and our partnership with Motivate.”

Riders can locate e-Bikes using the Ford GoBike app, rent them from any station where they are available using their Clipper card or smart phone, and park them at any station in San Francisco. For a limited time, Ford GoBike members and riders purchasing a day pass or single-trip fare will be able to ride an e-Bike at no extra cost. Bike Share for All members (low-income residents who become Ford GoBike annual members at the greatly discounted rate of $5 for their initial year) will always be able to use e-Bikes at no extra cost throughout the pilot, for rides of up to 60 minutes.

The custom e-Bikes were developed through a partnership with GenZe, a leading developer of zero-emissions, two-wheel electric vehicles. To announce the pilot program, the e-Bikes will be displayed at this week’s Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas as a part of the tech show’s “Smart Cities” exhibit. The e-Bike’s maximum speed is 18 mph. It features a 345 Wh Li-ion battery and a user interface panel that lets riders know their speed and battery charge level.

By adding e-Bikes on a 12-month pilot basis, Motivate will be able to gather community feedback and work with its city partners to evaluate the results of the program before looking to add e-Bikes permanently to the Ford GoBike system.

Since launching in June, the Ford GoBike system has become an integral part of the Bay Area’s transportation network. With 262 stations and 2,600+ bikes on the ground across San Francisco, San Jose, Berkeley, Oakland and Emeryville, the system has generated more than half a million rides since launch in June of 2017. When completed in 2018, the 7,000-bike, 546-station Ford GoBike network will be the second-largest bike share system in North America, while setting new national standards in density, convenience and socio-economic equity.

About Motivate

Motivate, the global leader in bike share, operates tens of thousands of bikes across four continents. Led by an executive team with deep experience at the highest levels of public transportation and technology, the company is relentlessly focused on innovation and has a proven and sustainable business model to manage complex operations and logistics. A vertically integrated company, Motivate controls the full technology stack, enabling us to lead on the design and deployment of the next generation of bike share technology. Motivate works in close partnership with government officials to implement bike share systems that meet the unique needs of the cities in which we operate. Motivate systems, including Citi Bike in New York, Divvy in Chicago, Capital Bikeshare in the D.C. area, Hubway in the Boston area, BIKETOWN in Portland and Ford GoBike in the San Francisco Bay Area, are responsible for over 80 percent of bike share trips taken annually. To learn more please visit the Motivate newsroom at https://www.motivateco.com/news.

About the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC)

MTC is the transportation planning, financing and coordinating agency for the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area. For more information, go to http://mtc.ca.gov.

About GenZe

GenZe has a simple motto: “Two Wheels. One Planet. Zero Emissions.” GenZe is committed to providing easily-accessible personal transportation through e-Bikes and e-Scooters loaded with smart, connected technology and powered by sustainable, zero-emissions electric energy.

GenZe manufactures and assembles in Ann Arbor, Michigan with corporate headquarters in Silicon Valley. GenZe is a division of the globally-expanding $19 billion Mahindra Group, which focuses on enabling people to rise through new and better solutions to tomorrow’s challenges. The Mahindra Group is a worldwide leader in aerospace, automotive, utility vehicles, tractors, motorcycles, clean energy, and more. For more information on GenZe, visit www.genze.com.”

Our US Postal Service Gets an Early Start with Parking in the New Bike Lanes of Masonic Avenue

Monday, November 27th, 2017

And this lengthy project isn’t even done yet:

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Where will these trucks park after completion?

– The slow lane, leaving just one for MUNI and cars?

– The slightly elevated bike lane, as seen?

– The new overly-wide sidewalks?

– Some yet-to-be-designated delivery vehicle / UBER Lyft dropoff point?

IDK.

 

Test Riding the New and “Improved” Masonic Boulevard – It’s Not Going to be a Night-and-Day Difference, Safetywise

Tuesday, November 21st, 2017

Here you go, heading south, in the downhill direction – you’ve got your new median on the left, your downsized two lanes of traffic, your removed bus stops (so MUNI will just stop in traffic in future), your (slightly) raised cycle track and then your preexisting houses and driveways on the right:

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And here’s your reverse angle:

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So this isn’t much of a difference, safetywise, right?

What else, oh, for the next year or two of construction, we’ll continue to see this kind of half-assed engineering – this is a wheelchair ramp, of sorts:

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Hey, why would bike riders even want to get onto the sidewalks of Masonic? Well, you should try it sometime, as this person ahead of me wisely was doing. (And boy, if you threw in heavy rain and a few epically drunk drivers, the likes of which killed a pedestrian and a bike rider on this stretch of Masonic the past decade or so, well that’d make the sidewalk even more appealing.)

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Those are USF trees you can see on the right in the above photo. This used to be the narrowest sidewalk of Masonic north of Fell, but as you can see it’s quite wide now.

But look, turnabout is fair play, as peds seems to enjoy walking in the new bike path. That’s a bus stop there on the left, complete with a cut out to please Area Residents:

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There are costs and benefits to these changes, of course. It’s too bad that our SFMTA didn’t even try to document them…

Either Ford Rejected Palo Alto or Vice Versa – GoBike Rental Service Cancelled in PA – City is on “a New and Better Path”

Tuesday, October 31st, 2017

Ouch. This is how it was supposed to be, down StanFORD way:

Palo Alto expands bike share system with Ford’s help

But TWTATIN, see? Here’s the reason why Ford Motor Company ads won’t be rolling all over PA:

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So, not only will Palo Alto’s “bikeshare” rentals not have giant FORD logos on them, Palo Altons will have a newer and better program. Sounds like a win-win, considering all the baggage that comes with making a deal with FoMoCo.

Wonder if Ford Motor’s vaunted GoBike rental program will end up as three islands – SF, SJ and East Bay? (Of course, these blue bikes will continue to travel across bridges and tunnels from county to county, but that’s not allowed, you know, per se.)

(And as far as Frisco is concerned, it seems Ford is having trouble installing stations west of Masonic. Some neighbors are up in arms, mostly over the loss of parking spaces, and they hold a lot of sway in this town. Anyway, planned stations that were already supposed to be a done deal in the Upper Haight and on Hayes have stalled, and some Ford’s already given up on.)

Anyway, Ford and Palo Alto will always have the Ford Research and Innovation Center on Hillview.

Or not, either way.

I’m not sure how much the bay area needs Ford anyway…

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How to Tell You’re in a “Good” Neighborhood in Frisco: Are the Stripped Bike Frames You See Chained or Unchained?

Friday, October 20th, 2017

You see, ’cause in good nabes, ppl just donate unused frames to the street, a La Raza, a la gente, you dig? It’s a donation.

Good Frisco, in this case The Richmond:

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Regular Frisco, in this case, The Twitterloin:

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Keep on Truckin’, Gentle Readers…

Here It Is: SFGov’s Latest PowerPoint on “BETTER” MARKET STREET

Friday, October 6th, 2017

Here’s your link with 33 pages. Enjoy.

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(Funnier adjectives include “elegant” and “transformative.”)

Random Right-Turn-Only Requirement for Drivers and Bike Riders at 9th and California?

Monday, October 2nd, 2017

On 9th Ave looking north:

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I don’t see any other markings or signs, except for some official-looking painted-on arrow and a similar sign / street arrow  for southbound traffic.

One wonders, is this real life? You can’t simply drive north on 9th, or even turn left?

One wonders if these are real SFMTA signs…

Apparently, Some of Our Tourists Have NO PROBLEM Paying MORE THAN $12 Per Hour to Rent Ford Motor Company GoBikes

Wednesday, September 27th, 2017

Of course, there are still some tourists who misunderstand that they have to check their rental bike back in every 30 minutes and end up getting billed more than $100, after paying $10 or so for a “Daypass.” So yeah, that still happens.

But what also happens is other tourists do the math and say to themselves, well, I can rent this bike for $16 for the first hour and $12 per hour thereafter and goshdarnit, I’m cool with that.

Like this in Golden Gate Park, heading away from the nearest Ford Motor Company bike rental station:

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Now, if you operate an “exclusive” bike rental operation in, say, IDK, Golden Gate Park, well, this just might drive you crazy, as it’s been doing.

One solution to this bike rental competition issue would be to more clearly state what the FordGoBike rental rate is, and perhaps double the late-turn-in rate, the better to be more like a “last mile” “bikeshare” system and less like a traditional bike rental…

Rec & Park Lays Down the Law in the Panhandle: New GGB-Style Stencils Tell Cyclists to SLOW at Crosswalks

Tuesday, September 26th, 2017

Here you go – the paint’s still wet:

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When I say GGB-style, I mean the way they do things on the narrow sidewalk of the east side of the Golden Gate Bridge. It’s kind of the same thing up there.

Anyway, here you have it – our brand-new painted pedestrian crosswalks on the Golden Gate Park Panhandle’s multi-use path now have instructions, telling bike riders “XING SLOW,” see?

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So this should end any (endless) discussion about who has right of way, and it should get a certain percentage of (usually male, road-bike owning, I-had-a-dream-last-night-that-I-won-the-Tour-de France) bike riders to be more cautious.

In closing, here’s a big-ass RPD stencil:

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It Begins: Rec and Park Finally Gets Around to Painting Crosswalks onto the Panhandle Bike Path – But Who Has the Right of Way?

Friday, September 22nd, 2017

Here you go – this is this morning:

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And here’s the result. Crosswalks are laid out all the intersections this multi-use path has with Shrader, Cole, Clayton, Ashbury, Central, and Lyon, as I was just talking about a couple days back.

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So, who has the right of way at these intersections – is it bike riders or peds? Well, IDK. I know about the arguments, I just don’t know the answers. (Is this bike path a “wilderness trail?” I’ve heard that one, from an in insurance company trying to deny coverage.)

Anyway, I’m thinking that about 25% of the peds have quite deficient situational awareness on this path (including two of the three workers seen above) and about 15% of the bike riders are stereotypical jerkwads who “knows my rights” and go a bit too fast. When these two subsets meet up at these unusual intersections, accidents happen, oh well.

We’ll see how this goes. (One hopes our RPD could put up a little signage about a speed limit and who has the right of way, if that’s not too bold for RPD to consider…)

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