Posts Tagged ‘birds’

Spring Has Sprung, So the World-Famous BELL PLUMBING & DRAIN Art Van has Once Again Become a Nest for Birds

Wednesday, April 2nd, 2014

See? It says nest right there:

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It’s Bayshore, baby!

Pigeons Invade the Western Addition Lucky Supermarket in NoPA – What Happened Next Will Amaze You

Wednesday, February 12th, 2014

Or not. I mean, it’s just a pigeon flying through a super.

[UPDATE: All you need to know about city pigeons eating junk food is right here, from Erin Sherbert at SF Weekly.]

This one made it to the end of the store though, shown here in the chips section:

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Leave us recall 2010, when another boid had a go:

Mmmm…rice!

Here’s What Happens to Your Mylar Helium Balloons: They Fly to Middle Farallon Island and Mess with the Sea Lions

Monday, December 30th, 2013

See?

Perhaps from a Raider’s game, or a black celebration:

Steller sea lion with Mylar balloons near Middle Farallon (photo by CS) – click to expand

Get all the deets on westernmost San Francisco from Notes from Smellephant IslandThe adventures of a wayward biologist living with seals on the Farallon Islands”

 

The “World’s Most Rodent-Packed Island” is in San Francisco – When Will We Let the Feds Kill the Mice on South Farallon?

Tuesday, December 17th, 2013

Here we go, from the USA Today from a few months back:

“Those suffering from musophobia would be wise to steer clear of the South Farallon Islands. The archipelago, which sits just 27 miles off San Francisco, is the most rodent-dense island in the world, with an average of 500 Eurasian house mice occupying each of its 120 acres (that’s 60,000 total).”

Now I’ll tell you, I have had it with these motherfucking mice on this motherfucking island.

So why don’t we finally get rid of them, like this:

South Farallon Islands Invasive House Mouse Eradication Project: Revised Draft Environmental Impact Statement

(That’s posted on a either pro-mouse or anti-mouse website – I just can’t tell and don’t really care.)

A few years back, up in Alaska, the Feds killed off all the rats on Rat Island in the Rat Island Group:

THE RAT ISLAND RAT ERADICATION PROJECT: A CRITICAL EVALUATION OF NONTARGET MORTALITY - Final report issued December 2010

See? That was a huge success. Now the chopper pilots were nervous up there ’cause a big storm was coming so they wanted to bug out of there with a quickness so they didn’t follow their marching orders very well so more bald eagles died than was necessary. But they killed all the rats on Rat Island, hurray!

All we need to do is nothing. Then the feds can get off their asses and start killing all the mice.

“More study” is NOT needed.

That’s your update.

A relatively fog-free day in the Sunset District.

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Through the tinted glass of the ginourmous windows of Yelp-rated Sava Pool

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From a higher sperspective in the Twin Peaks area, on an exceptionally clear morning.

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Can you see the lighthouse on the top of South East Farallon Island?

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Noisy Canon 10D at 840mm, from Christmas Tree Point Road, a skosh more than 30 miles away…

“Art” Happens on McAllister Street – Colorful Origami Crane Birds Suddenly Appear on Our Asian Art Museum

Tuesday, July 16th, 2013

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Oh, and Membership at the Asian Art Museum / Chong-Moon Lee Center for Asian Art and Culture is cheaper than you might think…

What’s It Like to Feed Hundreds of Pigeons in the Same Place Every Day? Civic Center’s Pigeon Man Knows

Friday, July 27th, 2012

Pigeon Man, he’s there every day:

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Where does he get his supply of pigeon feed?

No one knows.

Civic Center’s Famous Pigeon Man – Feeding Hundreds of Birds Every Day – Same Time, Same Place

Monday, July 23rd, 2012

The pigeons of Civic Center know Pigeon Man is coming – they walk with him down Larkin:

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See? They use the crosswalk better than the average San Francisco pedestrian:

Now, here’s your payoff, some kind of grain, like what the Road Runner used to peck at:

Hurray!

The Feds Make a Deal to Set Aside More Space for Western Snowy Plovers, San Francisco’s Cutest Birds

Thursday, June 21st, 2012

The Center for Biological Diversity is crowing about more room being designated for the Western Snowy Plover along the west coast.

San Francisco isn’t getting more space for these critters but they already have as much as they need here now, not that some area dog owners agree with the way things are these days.

Anyway, here are some San Francisco Snowy Plovers and the also the deets of the new agreement with the Feds are below.

(Oh, and remember, as always, plover rhymes with lover.)

A snowy plover on Ocean Beach _not_ being harassed by a dog:

Now, Ocean Beach Dog, ooh, somebody over there got an off-leash ticket from the Feds a looooong time ago. (Can you guess what year by looking at the website design? Sure you can.) Oh well. Well, the Feds don’t like Ocean Beach Dog and people what behave like Ocean Beach Dog. The Feds consider us Whacko City, USA because of outfits like OBD, oh well.

Most dogs don’t bother the boids, of course. Can you see the snowy plover?

But some dogs do harass the birds. (These aren’t actually snowy plovers near Lawton and the Great Highway but the dogs don’t know or care about that.)

(Get those Ocean Beach birds, good boy!)

And here’s the sitch up in Crissy Field:

See the birds, see the unleashed dog?

Is is surprising to you that an unleashed dog could find and chase these plovers? What was surprising to me was to hear that this particular boid flew up from Morro Bay (where it was banded and which is like way south of here) all the way up to the Marina District:

Keep on keeping on, plovers:

More Than 24,000 Acres of Critical Habitat Protected for Western Snowy Plover

PORTLAND, Ore.— In response to a Center for Biological Diversity lawsuit, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today designated 24,527 acres (38 square miles) of critical habitat to protect the Pacific Coast population of threatened western snowy plovers in Washington, Oregon and California.

“Protecting critical habitat will help this lovely shorebird continue on the path to recovery,” said Tierra Curry, a conservation biologist at the Center. “Species with federally protected habitat are more than twice as likely to be moving toward recovery than species without it, so this puts a big safety net between plovers and extinction.”

Western snowy plovers breed primarily on beaches in southern Washington, Oregon, California and Baja California. Today’s designation includes four critical habitat units in Washington (covering 6,077 acres), nine units in Oregon (covering 2,112 acres) and 47 units in California (covering 16,337 acres).

Snowy plovers were listed as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act in 1993, when the coastal population had dropped to 1,500 birds and plovers no longer bred at nearly two-thirds of their former nesting sites. That Endangered Species Act protection allowed the population to increase to more than 3,600 adults by 2010.

Plovers are recovering but still face many threats, including widespread and frequent disturbance of nesting sites by humans, vehicles and off-leash dogs; crushing by off-road vehicles; global climate change; pesticide use; and habitat loss.

The western snowy plover was first granted 19,474 acres of critical habitat in 1999. In 2005 the Bush administration illegally reduced the critical habitat to 12,145 acres, eliminating protection for thousands of acres scientists believed necessary for the snowy plover’s survival and abandoning key habitat areas crucial for recovery. In 2008 the Center sued over the unlawful reduction of the plover’s habitat protections, leading to a settlement agreement with the Service and today’s revised designation.

Today’s final rule includes the reinstatement of habitat areas identified by government scientists as essential that were improperly withdrawn in 2005; inclusion of some areas not currently occupied by plovers but important for their recovery; and addition of habitats such as back-dune systems in an attempt to offset anticipated effects of sea-level rise caused by climate change.

The western snowy plover is a shy, pocket-sized shorebird that weighs less than two ounces and lives for three years. Plovers forage for worms, insects and crustaceans in wet sand and in kelp that has washed ashore. The word “plover” is thought to come from the Old French”plovier” or “rain bird” because plovers were seen on sandy French beaches during spring rains.

The Center for Biological Diversity is a national, nonprofit conservation organization with more than 375,000 members and online activists dedicated to the protection of endangered species and wild places.”

Oh, and also remember that San Francisco is for Plovers:

Single Parent Heads to the Western Addition’s “Ghetto Lucky” to Feed Hungry Teenager, Avian Edition

Monday, June 18th, 2012

I’ll tell you, I don’t know why people call the Lucky on Fulton the Ghetto Lucky, but lots of people do.*

Anywho, this was the scene out front the other day – the fledgling on the upper right was getting fed by the parent on the lower left:

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These kinds of boids seem to like whatever kind of vegetation the Sav Mart / Albertson’s people put in there. And they’re all over the place now, feeding their hungry kids.

The next step will be how to get inside the Fulton Lucky for some light noshing.

Like this:

Nature is Everywhere.

*Actually, there’s nothing wrong with it. I mean, it’s not Whole Foods or nothing, but maybe that’s a good thing…

The Bald Eagles are Coming, the Bald Eagles are Coming Back to San Francisco! From Santa Clara, San Mateo, and Marin

Thursday, April 5th, 2012

Start off here at Bluoz and then you’ll be able to link through to HawkManStan and others.

Here’s the latest, from Santa Clara County:

Via John K at Calaveras Reservoir – click to expand

What can I say but that it’s Bald Eagle Watch time, baby?

Dese boids are coming in from the north and from the south.

When will we have a nesting pair here in San Francisco?