Posts Tagged ‘Borrow’

OMG, You Totally Need to Check Out an Electricity Meter from the SF Public Library – See How Much Juice You’re Using

Monday, January 28th, 2013

Well of course you know how much juice you’re using on a a monthly basis, but if you go to your local branch library you’ll be able to check out an electricity meter that’ll tell you how much each of your appliances is sucking down.

Like this:

Click to expand

The entire program is ably explained here by the San Francisco Chronicle’s Deb Wandelll. (And obviously, people, make sure you unplug you old analog 13″  CRT TVs that you don’t even use anymore…)

I’ll tell you, I haven’t borrowed anything from the lieberry in a good long time, but this thing I just checked out myself.

The big fridge is brand new and you can tell by looking at this meter, so that’s good. (I wish it didn’t have to be an expensive counter-depth model but this one was the biggest model available that would fit through some super-narrow Victorian doorways (after taking both fridge doors off, yish))

Now the mini fridge and the chest freezer, well, they’re just not built as well so they cost a pretty penny to run even though they’re newish. Oh well.

The 70″ Sharp is from 2011 – it’s fine. It’s LED after all.

Speaking of which, you can light up a whole room with a “25 watt” LED light on a desk lamp, as I do. The meter says that these bulbs burn 5 watts, which is about what I figured.

You can’t use the meter to see what your overhead room lights are using, but you can just look at the bulbs’ ratings for that. (2012 was probably the first year it made sense to convert to LED lighting  - Costco is now selling heavily-subsidized bulbs so you ought to get some yourself.)

Or if you want, you can just buy a meter from Amazon, I don’t care. But then what do you do with the meter when you’re done with it.

Congratulations to the SFPL for this program

OMG, Our San Francisco Public Library is Now Letting Your Check Out Electric Meters for Free – Save $$ at Home

Wednesday, January 16th, 2013

Soon you’ll be able to see how much juice each of your appliances is using by simply checking out a meter as if it were a book.

But act fast – these things should prove popular.

All the deets:

“San Francisco Public Library to Offer Home Metering Devices - To Measure Home Appliance Energy Use - Adds to list of services for city residents

SAN FRANCISCO, Jan 16, 2013 – The San Francisco Public Library today launched a new program to offer library patrons What’s Your Watt home electric metering devices as a tool to measure energy usage in home electronic appliances.

Sponsored by Wells Fargo and Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), What’s Your Watt is a collaborative effort by the San Francisco Public Library’s Green Stacks program, the Department of the Environment (SF Environment), and the Business Council on Climate Change (BC3). Wells Fargo presented the idea for the program and a seed grant to purchase meters, which are now available for check out at all 28 San Francisco public libraries. PG&E provided the home metering devices. Borrowers may take the devices home to determine wattage, associated costs and C02 emissions information for all electrical appliances, including computers, refrigerators and hair dryers.

“Thanks to the generous support of Wells Fargo and PG&E, San Francisco library users can now check out a home energy metering device along with their books,” said Melanie Nutter, director of SF Environment. “We are delighted that our libraries and local businesses are so committed to helping San Franciscans reduce their energy use, save money and lower their carbon emissions.”
Standard library borrowing rules apply for the home metering devices, which can be checked out for three weeks. Each branch library and the SFPL Green Bookmobile will have two devices and the Main Library will have six devices.

The What’s Your Watt home metering devices are simple to use and come with instructions in English, Spanish, Chinese and Russian. Additional information can be found at: www.sfenvironment.org/whatsyourwatt.

“It is our hope that San Franciscans will take advantage of this program so they can reduce their energy consumption to lower their energy bills, while benefitting the environment as well—both great goals to start in the new year,” said Tracy Curtis, president of Wells Fargo’s San Francisco market.

About SFPL Green Stacks
San Francisco Public Library’s Green Stacks is dedicated to helping the City go green. Libraries have always been dedicated to free, renewable resources and this new, citywide program highlights the environmental initiatives, programs, exhibitions and information created and supported by today’s library system. In partnership with SF Environment and Friends of the San Francisco Public Library, Green Stacks empowers all library users to live a more eco-friendly life.

About SF Environment
The San Francisco Department of the Environment (SF Environment) creates visionary policies and innovative programs that promote social equity, protect human health, and lead the way toward a sustainable future. We put our mission into action by mobilizing communities and providing the resources needed to safeguard our homes, our city, and ultimately our planet. For more information on SF Environment, visit: www.sfenvironment.org

About the Business Council on Climate Change
The Business Council on Climate Change (BC3) is a public-private partnership between local government and the business community that works to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in San Francisco through collaboration and direct action. For more information on BC3, visit: www.bc3sfbay.org

About Wells Fargo
In April 2012, Wells Fargo released a set of environmental commitments to be achieved by 2020; including reducing the company’s environmental impact, financing the transition to a greener economy and encouraging stronger and more sustainable communities. A leader in reducing its own greenhouse gas emissions and building sustainably, Wells Fargo has been recognized by the Carbon Disclosure Project and the U.S. Green Building Council. Since 2006, Wells Fargo has provided more than $11.7 billion in environmental finance, supporting sustainable buildings and renewable energy projects nationwide. This includes investments in more than 260 solar projects and 34 wind projects that generate enough clean renewable energy to power hundreds of thousands of American homes each year. For more information, please visit: www.wellsfargo.com/environment.

Wells Fargo & Company is a nationwide, diversified, community-based financial services company with $1.4 trillion in assets. Founded in 1852 and headquartered in San Francisco, it provides banking, insurance, investments, mortgage, and consumer and commercial finance through more than 9,000 stores, 12,000 ATMs, the Internet (wellsfargo.com), and has offices in more than 35 countries to support customers who conduct business in the global economy. With more than 265,000 team members, Wells Fargo serves one in three households in the US.

About PG&E
Pacific Gas and Electric Company is one of the largest combined natural gas and electric utilities in the US. Based in San Francisco, with 20,000 employees, the company delivers some of the nation’s cleanest energy to 15 million people in Northern and Central California.

Funding for What’s Your Watt was provided through a partnership with the City and County of San Francisco. Through the partnership, PG&E offers comprehensive energy efficiency services and technical assistance to residential, small commercial, large commercial and municipal customers. This program is funded in part by California utility customers and administered by PG&E under the auspices of the California Public Utilities Commission.

Mythbusters! Adam Savage Needs to Borrow a Large Aircraft in the Bay Area for a Few Days – Won’t You Help Him?

Wednesday, January 25th, 2012

Adam Savage would like to borrow your airplane for a few days:

“ATTENTION! Anyone have a 200+ seat plane we can use (no flying) for 2-3 days in the Bay Area? We won’t blow it up. WRITE mb@beyond.com.au”

See? They won’t blow it up.

Now, I know what you’re thinking, you’re thinking, “What about the Getty Jet?”

Via All Valley Blogs 

But I think that old gas-guzzling Boeing 727* is too small.

But what about the big Google Jets? Either the 757 or wide-body 767 should work.

Now, what are the Mythbusters up to?

*There’s nothing wrong with The Jetty per se, it’s just that it’s old school so your chances of dying on it are one or two orders of magnitude greater that what they’d be on the JetBlue or something. And it’s not possible to upgrade all its low-bypass engines to a more modern design. Therefore it’s expensive to operate compared to jets that weren’t designed half a century ago.