Posts Tagged ‘boxes’

San Francisco Residential Architecture 2014: (Expensive) Little Boxes on the Hillside, (Expensive) Little Boxes Made of Ticky Tacky

Wednesday, March 12th, 2014

Little boxes on the hillside,
Little boxes made of ticky tacky,
Little boxes on the hillside,
Little boxes all the same.

See?

Click to expand

There’s a green one and a pink one 
And a blue one and a yellow one,
And they’re all made out of ticky tacky
And they all look just the same.

Not that I’m complaining or nothing.

WINDOW, WINDOW, BOX, WINDOW, WINDOW, BOX, WINDOW, WINDOW, BOX, WINDOW, WINDOW, BOX, ETC.

Friday, February 14th, 2014

Gracious urban living, Frisco-style:

Click to expand

And you may find yourself
Living in a shotgun shack

San Francisco Residential Architecture: (Expensive) Little Boxes on the Hillside, (Expensive) Little Boxes Made of Ticky Tacky

Wednesday, October 16th, 2013

Little boxes on the hillside,
Little boxes made of ticky tacky,
Little boxes on the hillside,
Little boxes all the same.

See?

Click to expand

There’s a green one and a pink one 
And a blue one and a yellow one,
And they’re all made out of ticky tacky
And they all look just the same.

Not that I’m complaining or nothing.

Why Does San Francisco’s Corrupt DPW Sometimes Haul Away San Francisco Chronicle Newsboxes? Photo

Friday, February 1st, 2013

I don’t know.

Click to expand

Something to do with corruption?

San Francisco Paints Green “Bicycle Boxes” in the Lower Haight to Warn Pedestrians of Cyclists Running “The Wiggle”

Tuesday, May 29th, 2012

This is the first I’ve seen of these things, so here’s a photo of one of the new “bike boxes,” or whatever they’re called:

Click to expand

I wonder, does Strava have a Wiggle segment? You know, so people could keep track of their times and race each other, you know virtually, you know, as Chris Bucchere used to?

Maybe, I don’t know.

Just in Time for the Holidays: Bike Lane-Themed Packing Tape! Bike Lane-Themed Packing Tape!

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2011

Via the Niana Blog from Carl and Cole, here’s what you need:

Bike Lane-Themed Packing Tape

“Whether you are a biker or not, it’s perfect for sealing your holiday cartons, boxes, or anything! People will be pleasantly surprised before they even open their packages.

2.5 inch x110 yards or 65mm x 100m. Wider than the regular 2 inch tapes (so that you don’t have to tape several times to ensure the carton opening is covered completely.)

I even used the bike lane tape on my checked luggage, and my suitcase totally stood out in the luggage conveyor at the airport. Not only my suitcase won’t be picked up by others by mistake any more, it also earned plenty of eyeballs :-)

OK then.

No AT&T LightSpeed Internet Service Anytime Soon – NIMBYs Win Against City – A Stay from Judge Harold Khan

Tuesday, November 15th, 2011

The hard-core NIMBYs at San Francisco Beautiful (our Comcast monopoly’s L’il Buddy) ended up going two for two yesterday in their crusade ensure that dial-up internet service is the best that some San Franciscans can get. That is, they won a stay from Superior Court Judge Harold Khan temporarily blocking the installation of AT&T sidewalk boxes and they’ll have no requirement to post a bond to keep their stay.

This is, of course, despite the fact that the Board of Supervisors recently approved the installation.

Let’s hear the reaction from AT&T Regional Vice President, Marc Blakeman:

“Residents across the City, as well as the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, have voiced support for competition and choice when it comes to TV, high speed internet and digital phone service. 

Despite today’s decision to issue a temporary stay, AT&T believes it ultimately will prevail in the litigation and it remains committed to bringing San Francisco a next generation IP network.”

Which, you know, sounds good to me, but I’m not a NIMBY.

So, when you see these existing boxes, which Judge Khan has no control over, what’s your reaction? Do you say, well there’s graffiti on a telephone box or an electricity box or a mail box so we shouldn’t have telephones and we shouldn’t have electricity and we shouldn’t have mail service? I don’t know.

Click to expand

Let’s hear from the NIMBY side of things after the jump, but I warn you, it’s barely legible.

On It Goes…

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OMG, NOPA NIMBY Nightmare: Telephone Pole Has a Cell Phone Antenna PLUS a PG&E SmartMeter – Double Trouble

Friday, October 28th, 2011

The SmartMeter is the round white thing on the right and the cellie antenna is that stuff jutting out at the very top.

How would you like this RF farm parked three yards from your front door? 

Click to expand

Poor NIMBYs.

Poor by-now-certainly-sterile, wealthy, white, wizened, whiny NoPNA NIMBYs of the Western Addition.

And won’t somebody please think of the children?

The Presidio Gets Into Geocaching: A New Wildlife-Themed, Outdoor Treasure Hunt – You Know, For Kids!

Friday, August 12th, 2011

Grab your GPS device and head on over to the Presidio to get in on the Geocaching craze.

All the deets, below.

HIGH TECH HIDE-AND-SEEK” IN THE PRESIDIO

GEOCACHING TAKES FAMILIES, ADVENTURERS OFF THE BEATEN TRAIL

Presidio of San Francisco (August 11, 2011) — “I found it!” exclaimed Alex, his face beaming with pride and the excitement only a 7-year old can muster. With a little help from his mom’s smartphone and a lot of perseverance, Alex had located his first geocache, discreetly hidden near a trail in the Presidio’s Lobos Creek Valley.

The Trust, in conjunction with the National Wildlife Federation, has brought Ranger Rick’s Geocache Trails—a new wildlife-themed, outdoor treasure hunt—to the Presidio.

Sometimes referred to as a game of “high-tech hide and seek,” geocaching is relatively new to national parks, but the phenomenon has been around for more than a decade. Using a smartphone or handheld GPS device, people hunt for “caches” (typically small boxes) hidden in public places around the world.

“Geocaching in the Presidio combines the excitement of a treasure hunt with the reward of discovering lesser known parts of the park,” says Damien Raffa, education and volunteer program manager for the Presidio Trust. “Offering this kind of adventure helps us bring new people into the park and expose them to some of the Presidio’s hidden gems.”

The Presidio offers two ways to play. Visitors can go to www.presidio.gov/kids/trails/ and download GPS co-ordinates, while those without a GPS device can download a map for a self-guided experience. Then simply follow the co-ordinates to uncover the geocache. The cache will never be buried but could be tucked inside a log or tree stump, under a bush or behind a wall. Inside the cache, searchers will find a logbook to sign and a unique stamp depicting a member of the Presidio’s wildlife community.

Ever more deets, after the jump.

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Supervisor Scott Wiener’s “Dear NIMBY” Letter for Those Distraught By Yesterday’s Vote to Allow AT&T U-Verse Service

Thursday, July 21st, 2011

Well, here it is, via Noe Valley SF, a Hyper-Local Guide to Noe Valley … With Attitude, it’s Supervisor Scott Wiener’s address to the NIMBY associations of District 8 regarding his approval of U-Verse Internet/TV/Phone service for San Francisco after all those years of delay.

See below – it goes on and on.

I myself don’t recall seeing too many AT&T boxes in the 415 with graffiti. The shots produced by the NIMBYs generally are from out of town / out of state. Anyway, here’s one of the genuine AT&T utility boxes already in town. It sort of has graffiti:

Via Eric Fischer – click to expand

Leave us begin:

From: Date: Wed, Jul 20, 2011 at 4:41 PM
Subject: My vote on the AT&T issue
To: Scott.Wiener@sfgov.org

I’m sending this email to a number of neighborhood association leaders and other involved folks in District 8, in order to explain my vote yesterday on the AT&T environmental appeal. I would appreciate it if you would forward this email to your boards, memberships, and neighbors who have an interest in this issue. The voters are entitled to an explanation of all of my votes (and I cast many each week), including votes as controversial as this one. People can agree or disagree, but they deserve an explanation.

I will start by saying that I struggled mightily with this issue. Like many of you, I do not like these boxes, or any of the utility boxes that are already on our streets. Part of me very much wanted to vote against AT&T and for an EIR simply because I dislike the boxes. But one of the commitments that I made to myself, and to the voters, was that I’m not just going to be a reactive elected official. I committed that I was going to be the kind of elected official who tried to find solutions to hard issues. I also committed to myself early on that I would not abuse CEQA by ordering EIRs where the law doesn’t support it simply because I have policy issues with the underlying project. As described below, ordering an EIR here probably would have been illegal and certainly would have fed into our City and State’s addiction to environmental review, with the effect that good projects (including public projects) are delayed, killed, or made much more expensive than they need to be.

The issue here was very hard — pretty much everyone agrees that Comcast is in desperate need of competition while also agreeing that these boxes stink. There were also incredibly strong views on both sides of this issue. I received many emails from opponents, passionately and articulately describing the issues with the boxes, and from proponents, passionately and articulately describing why we need the service and competition. This was a no-win vote for me in terms of popularity contests. Either way I voted was going to make one group or the other upset with me. But, for better or for worse, casting controversial votes is what we do at the Board. If I wanted to be loved by everyone all the time, I wouldn’t have run for office.

And, this issue pointed to a major problem we have in San Francisco. We do a bad job managing our sidewalks. Our departments don’t coordinate well. We don’t have a strong master plan. We haven’t fully implemented the Better Streets Plan. That plan is how we should be managing our sidewalks and deciding what to put on them and where. Not through CEQA, which is a blunt instrument that doesn’t get you much other than delay and expense, but through actually having a plan for our sidewalks. As described below, through a strong and well-planned permitting system, we can do that.

So, why did I, in the end, tip in favor of voting to reject the appeal?”

It continues.

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