Posts Tagged ‘California Attorney General’

Jerry Brown Throws Down: Criminal Music Companies to Pay for Music Fests Statewide in 2010

Monday, May 17th, 2010

California Attorney General Jerry Brown can’t abide goddamn record companies that fix prices. (Feel free to read that as record companies, straight up.) Anyway, when you bought all those Rico Suave CDs back in the day, you paid too much. 

Can I tell you how this all relates to the big scheme of things? No, I get my record co. antitrust lawsuits mixed up. But this whole deal probably had something to do with bad behavior by execs from Universal Music Group, Sony Music EntertainmentWarner Music Group, and/or EMI Group.

But that doesn’t matter now. What matters that these melon-farmers are going to own up for past misdeeds by paying for statewide music festivals.

El Protector De La Gente, Jerry Brown:

via Thomas Hawk

Check it:

Alameda Los Angeles San Bernardino Solano
Butte Marin San Diego Sonoma
Calaveras Mendocino San Francisco Stanislaus
Contra Costa Mono San Joaquin Tehama
Del Norte Monterey San Luis Obispo Ventura
El Dorado Napa Santa Barbara Yolo
Fresno Nevada Santa Clara Yuba
Humboldt Orange Santa Cruz  
Inyo Plumas Shasta
Kern Riverside Sierra
Lassen Sacramento Siskiyou

 

January April July October
February May August November
March June September December

Enjoy.

Brown and Arts Council Host Statewide Music Festivals Funded by a Price-Fixing Settlement
SACRAMENTO -Yodeling, operas, musicals, Japanese drumming and symphonies are among the summer events around the state sponsored by more than a half million dollars from a Department of Justice settlement with music companies in a case of fixing advertised prices.

Attorney General Edmund G. Brown Jr. and the California Arts Council today announced dozens of musical presentations during this summer’s festival season and throughout 2010. Visit the California Arts Council’s website for a full listing of concerts and events benefiting from the grants:
http://www.cac.ca.gov/programs/doj/.

“The Attorney General’s office is proud to be part of providing these cultural events that bring people together to experience all types of music. It’s affordable because of our ability to provide discounted tickets,” Brown said, “and these performances are a testament to the incredible richness and diversity of the state’s music.”

The grants support performances and events in 43 of the state’s 58 counties, reaching an estimated audience of 200,000.

All the deets, after the jump

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Jerry Brown Throws Down: Midas Auto Shop Franchisee Spanked Hard for Bait and Switch

Monday, January 25th, 2010

California Attorney General Jerry Brown can’t abide car repair shop owners who rip you off for unnecessary work. News comes this morning about a judge in Alameda County who signed off on a: 

$1.8 million settlement that prevents Maurice Irving Glad (aka Mike Glad), owner of 22 Midas auto shops throughout California, from owning or operating an auto repair shop in the state, after the franchisee “deceptively lured” customers with cheap brake specials and then charged hundreds of dollars for unnecessary repairs.”

Now what do you suppose Mike did with some of that ill-gotten booty? Well, he traveled the world, natch, but he also produced an Academy Award-nominated documentary (narrated by Edward James Olmos!) called Recycled Life. (So all those people in the East Bay and the South Bay who thought they were just fixing their cars actually were financing the Hollywood dream factory by paying an average of $268 more than they should have….)

Anyway, get the deets below to see how our California Bureau of Automotive Repair does sting operations. And get the other side of the story from Mike’s mouthpiece via Henry K. Lee right here.

El Protector De La Gente, Jerry Brown:

Read all about it, after the jump

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Jerry Brown Throws Down: State AGs Take On Abbott Labs for Blocking Generic Competition

Thursday, January 7th, 2010

California Attorney General Jerry Brown can’t abide big drug companies illegally blocking cheap generic substitutes from coming to market in a timely fashion. Check out the news just released by Press Secretary Christine Gasparac about Abbott Laboratories (ABT) and Groupe Fourner SA and how they impeded generic competition for the cholesterol-reducing drug Tricor.

All the deets are below and here’s a pdf of the $22.5 million settlement announced this morning.

El Protector De La Gente, Jerry Brown.

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California and 23 States Reach $25 Million Settlement Against Pharmaceutical Companies that Blocked Generic Drugs

Oakland-Attorney General Edmund G. Brown Jr. and 23 other state attorneys general today announced a $22.5 million settlement with pharmaceutical giants Abbott and Fournier after the companies “illegally blocked” cheaper generic substitutes for the cholesterol-reducing drug Tricor.

The settlement is the result of one of the country’s first legal actions challenging pharmaceutical companies for “product hopping,” a strategy to block generic competition by making slight changes to the formulation of a drug.

“Abbott and Fournier devised a complex scheme that illegally blocked cheaper generic drugs from entering the market,” Brown said. “They used minor reformulations of the drug to delay competition and filed frivolous patent lawsuits. This scheme cost California and other states millions of dollars.”

Beginning in 1998, Abbott and Fournier, two of the nation’s largest pharamaceutical companies, partnered to manufacture and distribute Tricor, a cholesterol-reducing drug. Tricor’s annual sales were in excess of $750 million.

By 2002, as Tricor’s patents were set to expire, several drug companies sought approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market a generic drug equivalent to Tricor. To be approved by the FDA, the generic-drug manufacturer must prove that its drug has the same active ingredients and the same labeling as the brand-name drug, in addition to being a therapeutic equivalent of the brand-name product.

Once a generic drug is approved for market, the market share for a brand-name drug like Tricor can decrease by up to 80 percent. Most states and group health plans require pharmacists to substitute the generic drug for a brand-name drug to get the cost benefit of the cheaper generic version.

Knowing generic manufacturers were attempting to enter the market, the lawsuit alleged that Abbott and Fournier devised a complex scheme to delay and prevent the approval and marketing of generic versions of Tricor. The companies made minor changes in the form and dosage strength of Tricor that did not provide any significant health benefits over previous Tricor formulations. These minor changes interfered with and delayed any FDA approval of the generics.

To further delay the process, Abbott and Fournier also filed more than a dozen lawsuits against generic drug manufacturers Teva Pharmaceuticals and Impax Laboratories because the law prohibits the FDA from approving a generic drug for 30 months after patent-infringement lawsuits have been filed. After the 30-month automatic stays expired, all of the suits were eventually dismissed.

As a result of the scheme, Abbott and Fournier recorded Tricor sales exceeding $1 billion at the expense of consumers and state governments.

Today’s settlement agreement requires the companies to cease illegal efforts to block generic competition to Tricor and to pay the states approximately $22.5 million dollars. In California, the Department of General Services, Medi-Cal and the Department of Corrections will be reimbursed for overcharges.

States joining California in today’s lawsuit include: Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Maryland, Minnesota, Missouri, Nevada, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Washington, and West Virginia.