Posts Tagged ‘california’

The Owner of This Car Used to Feed Feral Cats in Golden Gate Park – Huge Bags of Food on JFK Drive

Thursday, November 20th, 2014

I don’t know if she’s still doing this.

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Another woman had a car with a bumper sticker showing two hunters aiming at / shooting each other – that was her solution to hunting.

Anyway, they’d stop and then walk up to the nearest cover to dispense cat food.

The bird lovers did not / do not approve…

The Most Garish Electronic Sign You Could Put Atop Your Car

Thursday, November 20th, 2014

I’m speechless:

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I cry foul

An SFMTA Fantasy for Van Ness – Check Out This Illustration – IRL, Route 101 Will be Filled with Cars, Bumper to Bumper

Thursday, November 20th, 2014

Is this a joke?

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This is a joke, right?

School buses in San Francisco? Are we going to have yet another SFUSD consent decree and be busing kids around even more? Actually, SFMTA, the trend is to have less busing and also lots of kids ride on SFMTA buses, as you well know, SFMTA. So why would you show a Van Ness with more school buses than cars?

And also, the number of buses on Van Ness will be greater than the number of people waiting for buses on Van Ness?

What are you smoking, SFMTA?

Sometimes I don’t know.

San Francisco 2024 Olympics Roundup: Reaction to Today’s Big Push in the Pages of the SF Chronicle

Thursday, November 20th, 2014

Well, today’s the big day for the bid to have the 2024 Olympics in the Bay Area.

San Francisco puts in chips for 2024 Olympics by John Coté

1. Obviously, an Olympics in the bay area would be good news for the San Francisco Chronicle. Obvs. I mean, that goes without saying, right? See the editorial below. I mean, they learned us this in Economics, case studies of media support for Olympics past.

2. What’s this?

“We have a lot of reverence for the Olympics … but there may be some ways to modernize the Games or do it a little differently,” said Giants President and CEO Larry Baer…

Sounds like Larry’s been looking at opinion polls. You know, Lare-Bear, the other option is to simply let authoritarian regimes host them from now on.

3. Gee, I really think “improvements” should be in quote marks here:

“Plenty of uncertainty remains, however, including whether improvements to housing, transportation and other infrastructure are worth the cost of hosting the Games.”

4. Is this right, our we still in the first inning?

Baer acknowledges that their effort is still in “the first inning,” even after a months-long exploratory process that included meeting with U.S. Olympic officials in July.

I’d say we’re in the seventh inning stretch. This contest will be all over in a month or two. After that, the only question will be whether America gets the Games in 2024.  This “first inning” stuff is spin spin spin.

5. Here’s the start of some nice OTOH grafs:

“It looks more and more like a boondoggle,” said Andrew Zimbalist, economics professor at Smith College in Massachusetts and author of the upcoming book “Circus Maximus: The Economic Gamble Behind Hosting the Olympics and World Cup.” “It’s a very difficult calculus to make work for you,” Zimbalist said. “The modern Olympics costs billions and billions of dollars to host. The recent evidence we have is that it does not increase tourism, even during the Games.”

6. But this part here is false:

Private funding from international corporate sponsorships, ticket sales and local sponsorships would cover operating costs that Baer projected at about $4.5 billion.

How does John Cote know that operating costs will be covered? He doesn’t.

7. And what a coincidence that our budget and Boston’s are exactly the same! Who’s cribbing from whom?

Boston has a similar cost projection of $4.5 billion for hosting the 2024 Games, a number Zimbalist dismissed as “a nonsense figure.” “They don’t know what they’re talking about,” Zimbalist said.

This is a nice, strong statement. One would expect the cost overage to run from something like 200% to 500% – something in that territory.

8. Uh, the America’s Cup was a “boon” to which industries?

Last year’s America’s Cup was a boon to certain businesses but…” 

I can’t think of a one, honestly. A “boon,” really?

9. Here we go:

Olympic bid leaders aren’t touting the Games’ economic benefits, but rather the ability to rally a region around tackling some of its major problems — transportation and housing — while improving San Francisco’s marginalized southeast corner.

So, if we want to help black people in the southeast, why don’t we simply give them the $4.5 billion and be done with things?

10. And here’s your stinger:

“Olympians,” said Cribbs, “are just ordinary people who do extraordinary things.”

 Sometimes, I suppose. Other times, it’s like this:

Moving on… to this:

OPINION – Solid start to Bay Area bid for 2024 Olympic Games – San Francisco Chronicle

11. Whoo boy:

At the top of the list is a pledge that they will not be asking for any direct public subsidies in what is expected to become a $4.5 billion venture if San Francisco were to become the first U.S. city to host the Summer Games since Atlanta in 1996.

Didn’t we just through this with the America’s Cup? Who’s pledging that there will be no public subsidies? This is laughable.

12. Whoo boy redux:

“We’re trying to take all the lessons learned, not just from other Olympics but what we learned from America’s Cup,” said San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee, adding, “We’re going to be smart about it.”

This is what everybody says every two years. What makes 2024 different?

13. Whoo boy redux II, Electric Boogaloo:

This region’s diversity, appeal as an international destination and leadership in technological innovation would make it a perfect fit for an Olympic Games — as long as it’s done our way, with sensibility and sustainability. The framework of this fledgling bid is very encouraging

The Olympics in the Bay Area would be good for some and not good for others. The Chronicle says we should do things “our” way, but we’re following the well-worn path of countless others. Any “sensible” Olympics proposal from the bay area would get rejected by the IOC, so that option’s not really on the table, now is it?

And here comes CW Nevius, a bit off-message:

Bay Area’s Olympic dreams focused on landfill near Candlestick by C.W. Nevius

14. Ah, Nevius. Let’s watch him beg for access right here on Twitter. A bit unseemly, IMO. And then he goes on about the weather / climate. That’s the least of our problems, right?

15. Remember that stuff from Larry Baer up above about us being in “the first inning?” Forget all that:

It could work, but it would need buy-in — and soon 

I’m not sure why the Neve is so negatory on Brisbane. I think it could “work” as well as any other location.

Anyway, for some reason, the boosters picked today to have a Big Push in the Chronicle.

We’ll see how it goes.

Onward They Charge:

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Boston and D.C. Just Had Private Meetings with Olympic Officials – Will SF Have One Too Today or Tomorrow?

Thursday, November 20th, 2014

Or perhaps next week?

Check it, Boston just had its big meeting with the USOC, and DC had its yesterday.

What comes next on the list? SF and LA, right?

Now look at how many people were involved with this process in Boston two days ago.

If something similar were to happen in San Francisco, we’d have leaders from Stanford, UCB, UCSF, UCOP, ETC, and a bunch of Mayors from all over the bay area, gathering to meet with USOC chief executive Scott Blackmun.

I’m thinking our meeting will have a lot fewer people, as it’s still a secret, AFAIK.

And also, we seem to far behind Boston in terms of a public conversation.

The bogus I’m-the-Mayor-and-I-was-skeptical-at-first-but-now… pivot has already occurred in Boston a while back. Given the reputation of the Olympics process these days, the best way for the PR people promoting this coming fiasco to handle things is to have a kind of campaign like THIS IS NOT YOUR FATHER’S OLDSMOBILE or THAT DOESN’T LOOK LIKE A BUICK.

Anyway, it doesn’t look like the Public, La Raza, will be involved in this process anytime soon.

Oh well.

Does This Youth Need a Full Face Helmet to Cycle on the Sidewalks of San Francisco?

Wednesday, November 19th, 2014

The answer is “NO.”

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Is it legal for him to bike on the sidewalks of SF? IDK. It depends on his age.

Lady Cyclist on an Old-School Fixie Bicycle in Golden Gate Park: Guess the Decade

Wednesday, November 19th, 2014

I’m thinking that this kind of scene is pretty much what you could have seen in each of the past 13 decades…

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Here’s One Way that San Francisco Tourists are Better than San Francisco Residents

Wednesday, November 19th, 2014

San Francisco tourists never ever spend time telling you how many years they’ve lived in San Francisco. And of course, they never say that they were “born and raised” in the 415 either.

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How refreshing!

An Amazing Joint Press Release from Yank Sing Restaurant Workers AND Yank Sing Itself – $4 Million Labor Settlement

Wednesday, November 19th, 2014

So I’ve seen labor violation settlements like this $4 million one before, but I’ve never seen the associated press release come from both the restaurant’s and the workers’ side.

That’s why you can see plugs for this expensive 3.5-star Yelp rated restaurant chain.

(And I’ll tell you, it’s refreshing to see nonprofits in Chinatown NOT promoting the biggest pork barrel project in America as “transit justice” and NOT giving stencils to voters to tell them how to vote.)

Let’s get back to business and, if desired, let the racial profiling commence without any more wage and hour violations:

Chinese press release (新聞稿): http://www.cpasf.org/press/settlement-yanksing-chinese

Spanish press release (Comunicado de Prensa): http://www.cpasf.org/press/settlement-yanksing-spanish

PRESS RELEASE – For Immediate Release: Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Contact:        
Emily Lee, Chinese Progressive Association
Mariam Hosseini, Asian Law Caucus
Jonathan Glick, Yank Sing

Immigrant Workers Negotiate $4 Million Settlement - Award-Winning Restaurant Commits to Lead Industry Change in Workplace Standards

San Francisco, Ca – Today, a $4 million settlement and workplace agreement for restaurant workers at Yank Sing, a nationally rated dim sum restaurant, is being announced by workers and their employer. The settlement was the result of a unique collaboration between workers, Yank Sing, the Chinese Progressive Association, the Asian Law Caucus, and state and local labor enforcement agencies.  The landmark settlement not only compensates for past practices, but provides workers with pay and benefits beyond what the law requires while creating a business model that will lead to long term success for both workers and the restaurant.

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The Time to Buy Tickets for San Francisco Ballet’s Family Performances of The Nutcracker is Now – Best for Ages 5-11

Wednesday, November 19th, 2014

Here are all the deets from our San Francisco Ballet about five special Family Performances of The Nutcracker

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Family Performance 2012 (© Carson Lancaster)

“For five performances only, the first 500 children (under the age of 12) to arrive receive a special gift and everyone enjoys complimentary beverages and treats at intermission. For 30 minutes only, starting one hour prior to curtain, Nutcracker characters are available for photos, so arrive early and bring your camera!*

Family Performance Dates

*Family Performances are popular! Lines for entrance to the Opera House and for photos form quickly, so arrive early. Children’s gifts are handed out at the doors on a first come/first served basis, starting one hour prior to curtain. So that our dancers aren’t late for the performance, photo lines must be stopped 30 minutes prior to curtain.”

See you there!