Posts Tagged ‘california’

de Young Museum: Extended Hours for Final Weekend of “The Summer of Love Experience: Art, Fashion, and Rock & Roll”

Friday, August 18th, 2017

I liked this show.

All the deets, including info on extended hours for the grande finale, Man:

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Extended Hours for Final Weekend of
The Summer of Love Experience: Art, Fashion, and Rock & Roll

WHAT 
Extended hours for final weekend of The Summer of Love Experience: Art, Fashion, and Rock & Roll  – with more than 200,000 visitors and 370,000 web views since opening in April.Due to high demand, the de Young will stay open late during the final weekend of The Summer of Love Experience, before the exhibition closes its doors on August 20th. Turn back the clock one last time and relive this magical moment in history through iconic rock posters, photographs, interactive liquid light shows, costumes and textiles, and avant-garde films that could only be presented by the de Young museum.

WHEN 
Friday, August 18 | 9:30 am–8:30 pm
Saturday, August 19 | 9:30 am–7:30 pm
Sunday, August 20 | 9:30 am–7:30 pm

WHERE 
de Young, 50 Hagiwara Tea Garden Drive, San Francisco

WHY
On this 50th anniversary of the Summer of Love, The Summer of Love Experience commemorates an “only in San Francisco” social and aesthetic movement, and reminds visitors that in a time of international upheaval, the city played a vital role in changing society and amplifying the pulse of the nation.

ABOUT THE EVENT
There is only a week left to see The Summer of Love Experience, one of the most beloved exhibitions of the year. Since its opening on April 8, 2017, the exhibition has seen record attendance, bringing more than 200,000 people to the de Young. With special artist appearances and new extended hours on final weekend; this is your opportunity to explore the Summer of Love at the de Young.

Special Artist Appearances: 
Friday, August 11, Abstract Painting and the Psychedelic Experience: An Evening with Bill Ham, legendary liquid light show artist
Friday, August 18th, “San Francisco Trips Festival” and other Cinematic Delights: Film Screening and Conversation with Ben Van Meter, famed film maker Both events are free and open to the public.

The Summer of Love Experience is the ultimate trip, with more than 400 cultural artifacts that embody the very essence and aesthetic of San Francisco’s Summer of Love, including an audio tour narrated by Peter Coyote, a floor-to-ceiling poster shop reminiscent of Haight Street, a liquid light show room newly commissioned from Bill Ham, numerous rock posters, fashion pieces and artworks by Bay Area artists and beloved items owned by Jerry Garcia, Janis Joplin, and more.

Exhibition by the Numbers
With one more week to go, The Summer of Love Experience has already become one of the most successful exhibitions in the history of the de Young museum, having welcomed more than 200,000 visitors and 370,000 unique visits to the exhibition web site. During the 19-week run of the show, the de Young staff and docents have held more than 100 guided tours. Friday Nights exhibition tours have all been fully booked within days of release date.

The publications, including the 340-page extensive hardcover catalogue, the 40-page softcover Pictorial and the Digital Story; a free, in-depth digital educational exhibition guide released by the de Young to accompany the exhibition have all enjoyed high readership.

Ticketing Information
For adults, tickets are $25; for seniors 65+, $20; students, $16, and for youths 6-17, $10. Members and children five and under receive free admission. More information can be found online.

An audio tour narrated by Peter Coyote is available for purchase to visitors.

Exhibition Organization
This exhibition is organized by the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. Presenting Sponsor Anonymous, in honor of Max Hollein. President’s Circle: Lisa and Douglas Goldman Fund, and Diane B. Wilsey. Benefactor’s Circle: Nion McEvoy and Leslie Berriman, and Ray and Dagmar Dolby Family Fund. Patron’s Circle: The Levi’s® Brand, Yurie and Carl Pascarella, Edith and Joseph O. Tobin II, M.H. de Young Tobin II, and The Paul L. Wattis Foundation. Additional support is provided by Nancy and Joachim Bechtle; Jack Calhoun and Trent Norris; Lauren Hall and David Hearth; Debbie and Blake Jorgensen; Fred Levin and Nancy Livingston, The Shenson Foundation, in memory of Ben and A. Jess Shenson; Dorothy Saxe; and Christine Suppes.About the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco
The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, comprising the de Young in Golden Gate Park and the Legion of Honor in Lincoln Park, are the largest public arts institution in San Francisco. The de Young originated from the 1894 California Midwinter International Exposition in Golden Gate Park and was established as the Memorial Museum in 1895. It was later renamed in honor of Michael H. de Young, who spearheaded its creation. The present copper-clad landmark building, designed by Herzog & de Meuron, opened in October 2005. It holds the institution’s significant collections of American painting, sculpture, and decorative arts from the seventeenth to the twenty-first centuries; art from Africa, Oceania, and the Americas; costume and textile arts; and international modern and contemporary art.

How People Got Around Frisco BEFORE Lyft and UBER: The Secret Phone Numbers of Veteran’s Cab in SoMA

Friday, August 18th, 2017

Here it is: Gritty HARRISON 1500 –>, lovely COSTCO #144, and of course, the Italianate red/white/green of VETERAN’S CAB 502-1300 all down at 11th and Harrison in SoMA:

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I don’t know how things work now but back in the day if you were a regular / reliable customer, cab companies / drivers would give you secret phone numbers that would get you to Dispatch quicker than the public “sucker” lines that you’d see: in the phone book (yes, an actual book); painted on the sides of cars; or, in the case of Veteran’s, lit up in neon for tout le monde to see.

I can’t recall anything at all about 415 502-1300. I suppose it was ahead of my time. (Maybe it connects you to UCSF these days.) But I DO recall 415 552-1300 from the pre-UBER/Lyft era. At that time, if you gave that line a jingle ’cause you needed a taxi at, let’s say 7:00 PM on a Saturday night, you’d most likely get a busy signal, oh well.

Why? Well it’s ’cause there were <1000 taxi medallions in Frisco for the longest time. This shortage meant that cabbies could make bank, especially considering how cheap rents were Back Then compared with now. It was such a sweet job that former Mayor Willie Brown drove a taxi to pay his way through UC Hastings Law School back in the 1950’s. And in the 1980’s, Frisco was gaining a national reputation as a place where it was hard to find a cab. Read THE MAYOR, THE CABBIES and the 84 DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION – Historical Essay by Rua Graffis, United Taxicab Workers, 1996 for the reason why.

Anywho, just think about what phone number cabbies would use to call in for a tow truck if a taxi broke down – they sure as Heck wouldn’t use the sucker line, right? They’d call a number where somebody would actually pick up. That’s the kind of number that you’d want to use.

What’s that, you lived out at 25th and Irving way out there in the Sunset? Well in that case, you might have had to wait / give up on getting a taxi, but at least an effort would be made. Or maybe a taxi driver heading in that general direction would drop off and then swing on by in 20 minutes or so.

I’m not saying that that was great, but all this attention paid by the taxi industry to those who knew how to get through meant there was less attention paid to some tourist / newcomer who didn’t know anything.

Of course, our Chamber of Commerce and our tourist industry HATED this situation, but then, in part due to the difficulty certain ballers (like Travis K) had finding a taxi in Frisco ’round about a decade ago, ALONG CAME UBER AND LYFT.

Now, any rube can get a ride, but traffic is much worse, and getting worser, so who knows which era you’d prefer.

Ah, mem’ries…

If You Park Your UBER / Lyft Ride on the Streets of San Francisco, You Can Pay People to Come By to Detail It?

Friday, August 18th, 2017

Sure looks that way:

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I guess this would help with tips / star rating?

Shabby, Rusted Japantown – We’d All Have Been MUCH Better Off Without REDEVELOPMENT, Ch. CCLIX – Concrete And Clay And General Decay

Thursday, August 17th, 2017

Our J-Town is sort of a mess, not that I’m complaining, not that I’m calling for a “Fix-It Team” to drop everything and work on the solitary issue, that I, the monomaniacal activist, care about, no not at all. Let me explain.

All this Redevelopment stuff, all this concrete put in in the 1960’s is not up to snuff earthquake-wise – the garage, the east mall, the west mall, just entire blocks of Redevelopment. How on Earth can you bring things up to 2017-era minimal standards without spending a metric shit-ton of (non-existent) money? Well IDK.

And if even if you had the money to spend, how long would it take? How many years? What they’ve been talking about, for years/decades is an entire redo, a Re-Redevelopment, which would entail kicking out all the shops and restaurants, the bustling successful ones along with those just scraping by, and have them go … go where exactly? How about excessively wide Webster Street? I’m talking about the actual street itself – take out a couple lanes and the median and set up temporary shops, you know, Hayes Valley-style. That was a proposal.

And then, tens of millions of dollars (and who knows, nine figures?) could be poured in to seismic up.

(And to pay for this, there would have been a $100k tax on condos, so good luck with that – do you want to build up Japantown with slivers filled up with 500-1000 new condo units? Well, that’s what some people wanted.

Anyway, the moral of the story is for SFGov to not be so goddamned confident with future projects. Kind of like, “Don’t Just Do Something, Just Stand There.” And maybe we should instead spend our money on fixing up our Mistakes From The Past.

JMO.

And now, Japantown, a land of Wind and Ghosts:

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And car break-ins, of course, for tourists and locals alike. The expensive signs make everything better though, some feel:

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So you want to build a bridge, young Designers and Architects and Planners, but you don’t want to maintain it, that’s Someone Else’s Problem? You want to get it on to Make the Baby, but you don’t have the Staying Power to take care of the Baby. It sure as Hell looks that way:

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But newish banners – that’s the solution, so far:

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In the meantime, Concrete and Clay. 

And General Decay

FIN

Clever or Too Clever? This is How El Tonayense Taco Truck “Reserves” Its Place Overnight in Front of the Best Buy

Thursday, August 17th, 2017

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IDK how things work here, how the taco truck people manage to reserve a parking space. But I’ll tell you, kind of thing was a huge issue during the Great Food Truck Battle of 2nd Street back in 2011.

Back then, if you didn’t want food trucks around your legacy lunch spot, you’d park your (or your friend’s) SUV or pick-em up exactly where a hated food truck would want to come to steal your customers.

Thusly

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And thusly:

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Anyway, like I say, I don’t know how this parking reservation system works today…

A Tent City Moves: Mayor Ed Lee’s Vietnam – He Can Take Any Hill in the Theater, But He Can’t Win the War

Thursday, August 17th, 2017

[TRIGGER WARNING: Military Analogy – “taking the hill” as in Hill 937 during the Vietnam War, for example. Also Personal Vietnam, as with DJT. Also a kind of Sports Reference, to the Big Game.]

This is 498 11th Street, let’s say. Really, it’s across the street from the end of the even side of the 400 block of 11th, but if I told you I was talking about the long-lasting Tent City (2015-2017) across the street from 498 11th, you’d go there and look around and say, “Oh, there it is.”

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How would you describe it? I almost don’t recognize the place, without tents* and parked RV/stolen-bicycle-part-processing stations.** Anyway, DPW SFPD SFMTA and other SFGov alphabet soups geared up*** to take this hill, betwixt Potrero and a Best Buy parking entrance/exit, really just part of one side of one city block, and now the water trucks come by three (3!) times a day, Mayor Willie Brown-style.

And this is 400 11th Street more or less. You can see the structure made to hold up the Veteran’s Cab sign on the left and the I-80 freeway on the right. In essence, a small Super Bowl Tent City moved one block, about 100 meters, a mere tenth of a Klick (Military Slang), to the northwest:

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IMO, absolutely nothing has changed, after this huge, years-long effort.

A solution to this whole issue is Above My Pay Grade. I’m just offering my Sit Rep.

Over and Out.

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**

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**

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***

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The Free Parking Abusers of Geary – If Your Primary Motivation for Getting a Handicapped Placard is Free Parking, You Don’t Need It

Wednesday, August 16th, 2017

I was on the edges of C-Town for a little while, on Sac above Grant so actually the traffic’s not too bad. Anyway, I (eventually) noticed that all the cars parked on the block (or my side of it, anyway) had handicapped placards AND that no Parking Control Officers were coming around. Could that be related?

I mean, if you have a quota, which you don’t, not officially, but actually you do, even these days, why would you waste your time where most of the rides are there all day and they’re not ticketable?

And here’s Geary on a Saturday, where they now have a bunch of meters installed.

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Of course, no PCO’s came here when I was here – they seldom do, it seems.

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Some of these placards are legit but MOST of them are not.

Of course, enforcement comes from making sure that the placards haven’t expired and from making sure the person belonging to the card has some relationship with the car being otherwise illegally parked, but not at all from people getting placards for the simple purpose of FREE PARKING all the live-long day.

The problem with this is that you make other people who similarly don’t need placards think they’re suckers for not joining the bandwagon. I mean, everybody has something wrong with them, right? That means that pretty much everybody can “qualify” for a placard in the State of Cali, pretty much.

Like Donald Trump has/had “bone spurs” like four-five times, that kind of thing.

Do you know who really hates the extremely high placard rate in Frisco? The SFMTA, that’s who. They know how much its costing them. If there’s reform, someday, it will come from them…

Dire Wolves, IRL – Where the Game of Thrones Got Its Fearsome Dogs – Canis Dirus in The House

Wednesday, August 16th, 2017

As seen in La Brea, Los Angeles. They’ve got hundreds and hundreds of tar-stained skulls up on a wall:

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And here’s a mama wolf on the right with a male on the left, complete with a wiener bone, no Viagra for me, TYVM:

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And feel free to call this place The La Brea Tar Pits, or The The Tar Tar Pits. It’s your right to do so.

Anyway, I thought direwolves were just made up – shows what I know…

Ford Motor Company of Dearborn, MI Defines “Living Wages” in SF, CA as Being Just 15% Above the Minimum – $16.13 Per Hour??

Wednesday, August 16th, 2017

And on top of that, Ford Motor Company (NYSEFS&P 100 ComponentS&P 500 Component) is “proud” to pay just $16.13 per hour.

See?

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And I’ll do the math for you, Gentle Reader, and I’ll show my “work,” heh:

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I think Ford could afFORD to pay about $10 an hour more to each one of its near minimum wage GoBike bike rental workers, especially in high-rent cities such as San Francisco (especially considering all the advertising they’re getting, especially considering how much they jacked up prices from the little-used, low-profile, tax and fee-payer-funded Bay Area Bike Share.)

Alternatively, FoMoCo could stop repeatedly claiming that it’s paying “living wages,” right?

What’s that, FORD is just like Citi in New York, a mere sponsor? Well, not really, as FORD tracks you, the GoBike user, more than Citibank does.  I mean, does Citi track how fast you drive your car the day after you install an app to use a bikeshare rental bike in NYC? IDTS. Like, why would it care? But does FORD?

look closer.

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Ah, mem’ries:

The Real Reason Behind Ford’s Move Into Bike-Sharing – Why would an auto giant want to start an urban bike-sharing business? Here’s a hint: It’s not about the bikes.

“Listen, here’s the deal. The opportunity is not bikes. That’s not why Ford’s in it. The opportunity is data, and the data is super valuable because it tells us these invisible paths that people are taking in this complex city in terms of how they want to get around.”

Oh what’s that, there’s no GPS on the bikes?

But what about your phone, is there GPS and whatnot on that?

There sure is. So that’s how they track your:

“Driving Characteristics, such as speed, use of accelerator, brakes, steering, seat belts, and other similar information about how the vehicle is used.”

And that’s not all…

FIN

Bad News for Amazon Whole Foods: “Court rules that ‘corrective education’ scheme is extortion – Herrera wins on two key issues in case”

Tuesday, August 15th, 2017

(So IDK. I thought that this exact kind of “corrective education” was “offered” to alleged shoplifters at the Whole Foodses of San Francisco, but I don’t know that this Corrective Education Company was the one involved.)

Anyway, I saw this scene at one of my rare visits to the Haight Street WF…

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…and then posted this and this.

And now here comes this, just released:

“Court rules that ‘corrective education’ scheme is extortion – ‘This is textbook extortion,’ court finds. Herrera wins on two key issues in case.

SAN FRANCISCO (Aug. 15, 2017) — City Attorney Dennis Herrera today hailed a key victory against Corrective Education Company after a court ruled that the private, profit-driven business was engaging in extortion and false imprisonment in its “diversion program” scheme.

“We should all be concerned about privatizing our justice system, especially when a business like Corrective Education Company uses the threat of criminal prosecution to intimidate and extort people,” Herrera said. “This ruling goes to the heart of their predatory business model, which is predicated on threats, deception and falsehoods. CEC is enriching itself on the backs of others, and many of the people they prey upon have limited means and are just barely getting by.”

Herrera sued the company in November 2015 over its “corrective education” scheme, asserting that the company’s practices amount to extortion and false imprisonment. The lawsuit was filed in San Francisco Superior Court on behalf of the People of the State of California.

Corrective Education Company contracts with major retailers, and when someone is suspected of shoplifting, they are taken to an isolated room and threatened with arrest and criminal prosecution unless they agree to watch a video created by CEC. In that video, CEC threatens to have suspects criminally prosecuted unless they sign a confession, agree to pay CEC up to $500, and undergo a six-hour “cognitive restructuring” and “behavioral modification” program. Faced with this Hobson’s “choice” between criminal prosecution and participating in CEC’s program, 90 percent of CEC’s victims — upwards of 13,000 Californians — “consent” to enroll in CEC’s program. After obtaining the forced confessions, CEC follows up with phone calls to the victims, again threatening them with criminal prosecution unless they pay CEC hundreds of dollars. CEC has also sent over 2,000 debt-collection letters in which it cloaks itself with prosecutorial authority in further efforts to enrich itself.

CEC operates in more than 25 states across the country.

In a ruling issued Monday afternoon, San Francisco Superior Court Judge Harold Kahn found Corrective Education Company engaged in extortion and false imprisonment.

“The undisputed facts … establish that CEC’s diversion program runs afoul of California’s extortion laws,” Judge Kahn wrote in his ruling granting summary adjudication on the two central issues in the case. “This is textbook extortion under California law, and has been so declared for at least 125 years.”

Numerous jurisdictions in California, including San Francisco and Los Angeles, offer legitimate, pretrial diversion programs that are overseen by district attorney’s offices. CEC operates entirely outside of the criminal justice system and without the approval of local prosecutors.

In his ruling, Kahn ruled that each iteration of CEC’s diversion program in California constitutes extortion and false imprisonment and that Herrera was entitled to an injunction halting the unlawful practices. CEC’s clients have included Walmart, Bloomingdale’s, Ralph’s, Abercrombie and Fitch, Burlington Coat Factory, and Kroger’s.

In the ruling, Kahn wrote: “By the quid pro quo of asking for money in exchange for forbearance in calling police, the retailer and CEC are acting in concert and are jointly liable for the extortionate conduct.”

The specifics of the injunction are still to be fleshed out, as is restitution and monetary civil penalties of up to $2,500 per violation.

The case is: People of the State of California v. Corrective Education Company, San Francisco Superior Court Case No. CGC-15-549094 filed Nov. 23, 2015.