Posts Tagged ‘Cargo’

Here’s What You Need: An Electric-Assist Cargo Bike from NTS Works of Santa Cruz – But a Bit Pricey at $4800

Wednesday, September 4th, 2013

I don’t know, man, but here’s your 68-pound, $4800 cargo bike from NTS Works:

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It’s new, it’s you, maybe.

All the deets of today’s debut:

“Introducing NTS Works’ electric 2×4 Cargo Bike

SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 4, 2013

What:
It rides like a bicycle and works like a pick-up truck. The revolutionary electric 2×4 Cargo Bike is using patent-pending technology to deliver more than 100 pounds of goods to customers in urban centers where vehicles either can’t go due to traffic congestion or can’t park due to high cost in time and money.

Who:
Creators at NTS Works, a start-up company based in Santa Cruz, Calif., are using their experience as founders, inventors, designers and battery technology developers at Zero Motorcycles to produce the 2×4 (pronounced “two-by-four”) electric cargo delivery bicycle.

Where and When:

–  NTS Works founder and CEO Neal Saiki will be in San Jose/San Francisco
on Wednesday, Sept. 4 and Thursday, Sept. 5 with the 2×4 Cargo Bike.
–  Neal will be available for media interviews to talk about the bike and
his experience as founder of NTS Works, and his technical and business
background as founder of Zero Motorcycles.
–  Neal can be reached by mobile phone at 831.247.2015, or via email:
neal@NTSWorks.com; media inquiries can be directed to Michael Coates
(408.399.9081 or mcoates@mightycomm.com or Tom Fulks (916.508.3837 or
tfulks@mightycomm.com) of Mightycomm.
Why:

–  Technology story:
–  The 2×4 Cargo Bike’s revolutionary design carries up to eight bags
of groceries, or more than 100 pounds of cargo.
–  It handles just like a regular bike under load. What sets 2×4 Cargo
Bike apart from other delivery bikes is the new and unique way of
steering the cargo. The patent-pending steering mechanism – unlike
anything currently available in the biking world – places the cargo
load directly over the front wheel for the best possible balance,
handling and maneuverability in tight urban environments.
–  The 2×4 pedal assist senses the rider’s energy/power needs and adds
three levels of power for flats, hills and acceleration.
–  The 2×4′s battery technology uses the highest quality lithium ion
cells available, with 500 watt hours for a real world range of 30
miles. The battery has a lifetime warranty, which no other e-bike
maker offers.
–  The 2×4 Cargo Bike is a real bicycle, in that it requires pedaling
to move forward. A steady and maintainable workout is provided to
the rider regardless of cycling skill. The 2×4′s smart pedal sensor
design provides just enough juice to get up grades without the rider
having to get out of the saddle, stand on the pedals and grind out a
sweaty climb.
–  Entrepreneur story: Neal Saiki is the founder of Zero Motorcycles, a
successful electric motorcycle company, and an inventor (battery
technology is one of his areas of expertise). Neal is a lifelong cyclist
and has applied his knowledge to designing and building an electric
bicycle that works for the task at hand and meets a need at a reasonable
price.
–  Environmental story: The 2×4 Cargo Bike is on the leading edge for
environmentally sound local delivery in urban areas, offering zero
emissions, pedal power with an electric assist (for hills, etc.), new
battery technology and a new, smart way to deliver goods in congested
urban centers.
–  Coolness story: This is a really great bike. You’ve just got to see it
to appreciate the creative design and ride it under load to appreciate
how totally awesome it is.
SOURCE  NTS Works

Photo:http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130904/SF74110
http://photoarchive.ap.org/
NTS Works

CONTACT: Michael Coates, 408.399.9081mcoates@mightycommunications.com

Web Site: http://www.zeromotorcycles.com

When You Need to Move Something Big Real Fast in San Francisco, Spirit Courier has the Right Bike for the Job

Friday, October 26th, 2012

See?

We’ve come a long way, baby.

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The modern-day warriors at Spirit Courier dominate the dojo that is the Financh, the Nine-Four-Triple-One

Check their cv’s.

Just saying.

A modern-day warrior 
Mean mean stride, 
Today’s Tom Sawyer 
Mean mean pride. 

Though his mind is not for rent, 
Don’t put him down as arrogant. 
His reserve, a quiet defense, 
Riding out the day’s events. 
The river

A Long Way Down: Child Cargo on Folding Bike

Friday, October 5th, 2012

OK fine:

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Well That’s an Odd-Looking San Francisco Taxi Cab: From Turkey (or Romania!) With Love, It’s Your “Transit Connect”

Friday, May 25th, 2012

Well I guess this weird taxicab is a Ford, sort of.

Anyway, it has lots of windows so you won’t feel too much like cargo on your way to SFO in the back of a cargo van:

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Learn all about the vagaries of international bidness, including the world-famous, anti-consumer 1963 Chicken Tax and how it affects us today, right here.

San Francisco’s Spirit Courier Uses an Unstealable Cargo Bike, So It Doesn’t Need to be Locked to Anything

Tuesday, May 1st, 2012

See?

How would you like to drive this monster around the mean streets of San Francisco?

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Danish Cargo Bike Fever: Catch It

 

The Breeders’ Choice: Xtracycle Cargo Bikes Have Become the Minivans of San Francisco

Tuesday, August 30th, 2011

See? You could probably fit another couple of ankle-biters on there, no problem:

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(But you shouldn’t have too many kids anyway, else the locals will start calling you a “breeder,” and that’s meant to be quite an insult.)

Get in on the fun here, but the prices seem a bit high, oh well…

How Many Large Dogs Can Fit in the Back of a Two-Seater SmartCar? How About One, For Starters?

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2011

Snug as a bug in a rug, don’t you think?

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Oh, here’s how other people carry their dogs around in Smarts.

(And thank goodness the practice of Smart-tipping hasn’t taken off on the West Coast, huh?)

Woof woof.

All Those Airplanes Making Noise Over San Francisco are Landing at OAKland – A Rare and Dangerous Fed-Ex MD-11 Jumbo

Monday, November 22nd, 2010

Here’s a recent view from the Western Addition towards the west, so the giant American flag you can see is indicating an atypical stiff breeze from the south, more or less.

Airline passengers don’t fly in three-engined tri-jets anymore because the concept isn’t fit for the 21st century. But the stuff you order on the Amazon rides old-school Fed-Ex Cargo McDonnell Douglas DC-10‘s and MD-11‘s all the time.

Now, the DC-10 got a bad rep about three decades back – some of that wasn’t its fault (like when a pilot heard 1500 feet instead of 1500 meters) but some of it was. So Mickey D came out with a replacement, the MD-11. It was better in a lot of ways but it turned out to be more crashy than its predecessor and that’s a whole story in itself.*

Anyway, these MD trijets generally do fine when they land facing straight into the wind, as here:

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Stay safe in your pterodactyls, in your flying dinosaurs, Fed-Ex pilots!

*Like how they made the landing gear stronger to handle the stretched body, so they’re stronger than the wing they’re hanging from – that situation has killed passengers and pilots. McDonnell Douglas simply tried way too hard to make up for the fact that its only jumbo design just happened to have an unnecessary third engine sucking up a lot of fuel.

Concrete and Clay and General Decay: Heron’s Head Park Lets You Explore the Bay

Thursday, June 3rd, 2010

Boy, I’ll tell you, if you ever make it to the end of Heron’s Head Park, you’ll feel like you’re on the bay, like you’re sailing along in a boat. You’ll feel the salt air whooshing along while the big ships pass by.

You’re out there, baby, betwixt Lash Lighter Basin and India Basin at the end of Cargo Way.  

Bring a fishing pole ‘n stuff.  

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Of course there’s still a lot of concrete and clay and general decay, but things are getting better.

See you there!