Posts Tagged ‘cars’

THE PORTOLA Update: Lousy Transit and Lousy Parking – Does Any Other District in Frisco Have It This Bad?

Friday, January 19th, 2018

Here’s the new sign for THE Portola, fka Little Jerusalem and The Flat.

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(So, when you’re talking about the San Francisco district, it’s the PORtola, but when you’re talking about the Street in the Presidio or the Drive (what’s basically a continuation of Market, which as the joke goes is “straight until it hits the Castro”), it’s porTOla, but  if you’re talking about the dude himself, it’s portoLA. That’s my understanding. (Oh, here’s KALW’s take.))

Anyway, Man, parking is a competitive sport here – ppl just circle and circle, and then they squeeze on in, thusly:

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Of course, parking is no picnic in more name-brand hoods such as Russian Hill or Nob Hill, but in those places non-driving options seem better.

Look at this, free parking for laundromat customers only, which I’ve never seen before in Frisco. What luxury!

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Anyway, ppl end up buying cars to fit the space they have:

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And they end up posting signs on the topic:

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And here – a brace of rusty rear-engined, air-cooled relics, all in a row, perhaps from the same owner. (I’ll bet this kind of thing gets discussed on NextDoor.)

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I don’t hear anything good about MUNI down here, on the wrong side of perpetually-congested Hospital Curve. So how else should one get around?

I wouldn’t mind riding a bike in the Portola, but I prolly would mind the ride to get all the way down there. I wouldn’t know a good way.

(Anyway, that’s my impression. I know all about the northern half of Frisco, but The South? Not much at all.)

The solution would appear to be just having a garage….

Severe Pwnage on Page – What Happens When You Park Your Car on the Streets of San Francisco

Wednesday, January 17th, 2018

My accident reconstruction capabilities, which were untaxed by this straightforward fender bender on nearby Hayes, are unable to make sense of this one on Page near Clayton:

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This damage was caused either by a Panzerkampfwagen Tiger B heavy tank or a Mercedes Benz E350

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Mystery Shroom, Masonic

Thursday, January 11th, 2018

Don’t know what this new thing does, or what it emits. Might make a nice street stool though:

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Thank goodness I have protection

MUNI Motorheads – These Well-Paid SFMTA Employees Take Don’t Take the Bus to Work, That’s for Sure

Thursday, January 11th, 2018

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Hey, I know. Why don’t we start charging SFGov employees like $400 a month to park, you know, due to the High Cost Of Free Parking and whatnot?

Until then, zoom zoom…

Scoot

Wednesday, January 10th, 2018

I’ve never moved a Scoot to escape, myself.

Another close parker on the Streets of San Francisco:

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Oh, if only all Scoot-ers were perfect parkers

If You Like Seeing a Caravan of Nannies in Idling Porsches and Mercedes Benzes on Avenues Golden Gate and Central, You’re Going to LOVE the Expansion Plans of San Francisco Day School

Monday, January 8th, 2018

This is Central. When this double parked line of vehicles gets longer, it turns west on Turk:

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And here’s the front of the line on GGA:

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Anyway, here’s the Plan and all the deets:

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Frisco’s Nicest Garage Owners: Gingerly Pulling Out Instead of Calling the SFMTA to Tow Away _Two_ Vehicles

Tuesday, December 26th, 2017

I didn’t think they could make it but they did:

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Both of the parked cars are illegally parked, perhaps two feet away from where they should be. If only one had followed the rules, then this wagon could have gotten out easily, instead of requiring a spotter.

I cry foul.

Anyway, this is the worst I’ve seen, in all my years…

SFMTA Forces Pedestrians to Wait as Pickups Turning Left Get Priority – At Recently “Improved” Oak and Baker

Tuesday, December 12th, 2017

So, this truck has priority and then a few seconds later peds may cross:

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This is similar to the design at masonic O’Farrell / Anza and Masonic, where peds also need to wait at the start of the signal, so about three or four drivers (assuming they’re paying attention – if they’re not sometimes only one car makes it through, sadly) can turn. And then when that’s done, peds may cross, not that ppl aren’t confused still, with that odd intersection.

Did I mention that Target paid for the signals at O’Farrell and Masonic? That seems to have had an effect upon design, you know, what with the SFMTA being the political animal it is…

Tesla Forgets the Lesson Toyota Taught GM in Fremont: “Build fast, fix later: speed hurts quality at Tesla”

Wednesday, November 29th, 2017

Read and learn, from NPR:

“At the old GM plant in Fremont, Calif., the system had been totally different and there was one cardinal rule that everyone knew: the assembly line could never stop.

“You just didn’t see the line stop,” Madrid said. “I saw a guy fall in the pit and they didn’t stop the line.”

Lee, the supervisor who oversaw the plant summed it up this way: “You saw a problem, you stopped that line: you were fired.”

As a result, vehicles at the plant had lots of defects. Haggerty saw all kinds of mistakes go right down the line.

“So we had Monte Carlos with Regal front ends and vice versa,” he recalled. There were cars with engines put in backwards, cars without steering wheels or brakes. Workers fixed them later in a yard outside — sometimes doing more damage to the vehicles.”

So those were the bad old days of GM in Fremont. But then came the Toyota Way of doing things during the NUMMI era:

At the NUMMI plant you can see Toyota’s solution to this — a thin nylon rope that hangs on hooks along the assembly line. It’s called the andon cord and when pulled, it will stop the line.

The first pull summons a team leader. Workers try to correct the problem on the line. If it takes too long to fix, the line stops. The andon cord also plays a surprisingly cheerful little song that workers can chose. For longtime GM workers who switched to the NUMMI system, all this was a revelation.

After two decades at the GM Fremont plant, Earl Ferguson flew to Japan to learn a whole new way of making cars.

When Madrid trained in Japan, he saw workers stop the line to fix a bolt.

“That impressed me,” he said. “I said, ‘Gee that makes sense.’ Fix it now so you don’t have to go through all this stuff. That’s when it dawned on me. We can do it. One bolt. One bolt changed my attitude.”

And guess what’s made at that very same factory down south in Fremont today – that’s right, Teslas:

After Tesla’s Model S sedans and Model X SUVs roll off the company’s Fremont, California assembly line, the electric vehicles usually make another stop – for repairs, nine current and former employees have told Reuters.

The luxury cars regularly require fixes before they can leave the factory, according to the workers. Quality checks have routinely revealed defects in more than 90 percent of Model S and Model X vehicles inspected after assembly, these individuals said, citing figures from Tesla’s internal tracking system as recently as October. Some of these people told Reuters of seeing problems as far back as 2012.

By now, the reader should have realized that New Tesla is sort of like Old GM.

Artist’s conception of Elon Musk wearing Mens crocs size XXL, if he ever were to do that and then pose awkwardly in/on an expensive vehicle that obviously didn’t fit him (or Arnold, or Gavin, or a lot of others who Wanted To Believe):

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Test Riding the New and “Improved” Masonic Boulevard – It’s Not Going to be a Night-and-Day Difference, Safetywise

Tuesday, November 21st, 2017

Here you go, heading south, in the downhill direction – you’ve got your new median on the left, your downsized two lanes of traffic, your removed bus stops (so MUNI will just stop in traffic in future), your (slightly) raised cycle track and then your preexisting houses and driveways on the right:

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And here’s your reverse angle:

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So this isn’t much of a difference, safetywise, right?

What else, oh, for the next year or two of construction, we’ll continue to see this kind of half-assed engineering – this is a wheelchair ramp, of sorts:

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Hey, why would bike riders even want to get onto the sidewalks of Masonic? Well, you should try it sometime, as this person ahead of me wisely was doing. (And boy, if you threw in heavy rain and a few epically drunk drivers, the likes of which killed a pedestrian and a bike rider on this stretch of Masonic the past decade or so, well that’d make the sidewalk even more appealing.)

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Those are USF trees you can see on the right in the above photo. This used to be the narrowest sidewalk of Masonic north of Fell, but as you can see it’s quite wide now.

But look, turnabout is fair play, as peds seems to enjoy walking in the new bike path. That’s a bus stop there on the left, complete with a cut out to please Area Residents:

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There are costs and benefits to these changes, of course. It’s too bad that our SFMTA didn’t even try to document them…