Posts Tagged ‘catamaran’

Here’s an Explanation of How the America’s Cup Rules are Being Changed, In The Name of Safety, to Benefit Larry Ellison

Tuesday, June 25th, 2013

“OR can quite legitimately claim that they need this change to improve the safety of their boat to acceptable levels. ETNZ/LR can quite legitimately claim that the issue is created by design choices.”

When you’re foiling a catamaran, you’re generating lift just like an airplane. The Emirates Team New Zealand yacht generates more lift with the forward element than the rear. The Oracle Racing Larry Ellison yacht does so as well but it gets a bit more lift from the rear compared with ETNZ.

So, ETNZ is more like a regular airplane with  a small tail and OR is more like this goofy thing:

Mandating a bigger tail for all comers in the name of safety is a way for the Larry Ellison America’s Cup people to gain an advantage for Larry Ellison and/or Artemis Racing, the team with the other failed design,

Let’s hear from Hump101, a poster at Sailing Anarchy:

“ETNZ have a boat that is almost entirely supported on its single main foil. The rudder provides very little lift, just control forces, which are relatively small. As speed changes, lift changes. The main foil is correspondingly adjusted, as this is allowed, so the lift remains as  required. The lift on the rudder changes, but since this force is relatively small, the change in attitude on the boat is not problematic, and the local effects of free surface and small size provide a natural limit to motions. When it goes wrong, the boat will pivot about its main foil, potentially creating a high bow down pitch angle, so they’ve included sufficient buoyancy in the bows to cope.

OR have a boat where the lift is shared between the main foil and the rudder. The amount of lift provided by the rudder is still a small proportion of the total, but the rudder lift force is large compared to the rudder control force. As speed changes, lift changes. The main foil is correspondingly adjusted, but the rudder isn’t. The change in force on the rudder is significant, and affects the attitude of the boat. A small rudder foil that is required to provide a lot of lift can only do so with a large angle of attack, so with a fixed angle, a large change in trim of the boat is required, hence poor control. When it goes wrong, the boat pivots about the rudder foil, and hence a reduced bow down pitch angle, and hence the boat can have lower volume bows to allow recovery.

I’m sure both teams have simulated both approaches. ETNZ decided that they would go for the former, at a price of bigger main foil, lower righting moment, and more aero drag, so they have better control over a wide range of speeds for a given rudder setting. OR decided on the latter as it provides a lower drag solution, but for a smaller range of speeds for a given rudder setting. Boat 1 was an extreme example of this, but boat 2 is less extreme.

However, OR have found that the range of speeds over which they have good control is too small using the maximum size of rudder foil allowed. Hence, when they are running in the narrow speed range, they look good, but as soon as this is not the case, they have large pitch angles. Using a larger rudder foil requires less boat trim to generate the change in force, and hence better control.

The problem OR face is if they were to move the main foils further aft and increase their size, they would then have a boat which, if it goes wrong, will not have enough buoyancy in the bow to recover from the large pitch angle that would occur with the bigger main foil. A potentially dangerous solution, and rebuilding the hulls is probably not feasible, since even if they had the time, the added weight is more than their program has in the bank. They aren’t allowed new hulls. Furthermore, they have made corresponding design choices with their wing that also suggest the expectation of a narrow speed range, and moving to a higher drag foil solution would present them with power issues.

I suspect that OR may have been using a larger rudder foil recently to achieve the improvements we’ve been seeing, and consequently they already know that operating with class legal rudder foils is not a safe option for them, since if they set up the small rudder foils for lighter winds, and the winds increase during a race, they will have an unacceptably high probability of pitchpoling.

As such, the move to increase allowed rudder foil size and control is a real issue for OR, as without it they will have to choose between pulling out of certain races when conditions change, or risking the boat and crew by continuing. ETNZ and LR, on the other hand, don’t have this issue, and in fact increasing the rudder foil size on their boats would not only increase drag, but also create control problems due to the size of the control force generated becoming too large. 

Hence the current dichotomy  OR can quite legitimately claim that they need this change to improve the safety of their boat to acceptable levels. ETNZ/LR can quite legitimately claim that the issue is created by design choices. Since the AC is not just a design and sailing competition, but a design, sailing, and legal competition, we’ll have to wait and see who has the best overall package.

And then, in response to a question about how the engineer knows all this:

“Because when the OR boat is in the water, its static waterline, combined with its visible hullform when on a crane, shows that the vessel CoG is well aft of the main foil location. On the ETNZ boat, this is not the case. Their main foil is about where the CoG appears to be (actually slightly forward, but not by much).

As such, the resulting moment generated by the offset between main lifting foil vector and sum of sailing force vector on OR requires the rudder foil to provide a significant lifting force, plus also to provide the dynamic positive and negative control force, whilst on ETNZ the rudder foil provide very little lift force, just the control force element.”

So that’s why this is a lot of horseshit and this could be in the near future of this attempt at an America’s Cup yachting match.

PRADA Makes a Mockery of the America’s Cup Safety Review Committee – Foiling Past Larry Ellison’s Paper Tiger

Monday, May 20th, 2013

Here’s the latest from the Larry Ellison People:

We appreciate the vote of confidence Mr. Bertelli, president of Luna Rossa Challenge, gave to the America’s Cup continuing as planned this summer on San Francisco Bay,”

Uh no. What you’re getting from Mr. Bertelli is NOT a vote of confidence.

In fact, it’s the opposite.

Let me show y0u. The Larry Ellison Safety Review Committee, which, of course, is reviewing, not investigating, oh no, never investigating, perish the thought, the safety issues created by, can you guess, anyone, anyone, that’s right, Larry Ellison, issued this statement last week:

“…teams have been asked to suspend all sailing in AC72 and AC45 catamarans until the middle of next week.”

Hey, how do you say “fuck you, Larry Ellison,” you know, en Italiano?

I think you say it like this:

Click to expand

Hey, is the SFPD doing a possible homicide investigation right about now? I think so. Think on that, Larry Ellison People. Think on that while trying to figure out how the very same “America’s Cup Family” that has brought us, already, the worst AC in history, is going to investigate itself, I’m sorry, review itself in a fair an impartial way.

Hey, doesn’t the Safety Review Committee have a whole mess of conflicts? Would you like me to list them for you? (Pillow Talk: “Hey Honey, do you think…”)

And that Artemis “Big Red” AC72 _didn’t_ fold up, as reported, “like a taco shell?”  So how did it fold up? Like a chalupa? Oh, what’s that, it didn’t fold up at all? Is that what you’re saying?   

The former Big Red upon San Francisco Bay, as seen last year, a ticking time bomb that went off this month, more expensive than some of the jetliners that flew above it, and more expensive and about as tall as some jetliners are long. And yet if you were killed flying to Vegas there’d be a big big investigation, right? And what’s the response from the Larry Ellison People? It’s if you want to make an omelette, you’re going to have to break some eggs.   

Now let’s hear from an AC72 crew member:

“I hope like hell that whoever survives this thing and wins it changes the boat class to anything safer than these God-forsaken death traps.”

Here’s What the Artemis Racing AC72 America’s Cup Yacht Looked Like Getting Hauled Out – Folded Up “Like a Taco Shell”

Saturday, May 11th, 2013

You can see  a little bit of the port hull and also the places where it ripped away:

Hauling out Artemis AC72 by Turtle Moon World

From the Newcastle Herald:

‘Nathan told me [the turn] didn’t seem any different to any other occasion,’’ Mr Outteridge said.

‘‘The bow dug in a little bit but he said that’s not unusual.

‘‘The next thing he heard a cracking noise and the boat went on its side.

‘‘Before it capsized it snapped in half, Nathan described it as folding like a taco shell.’’

And:

“A quick head count revealed one member of the crew was missing – Andrew Simpson – triggering a desperate search.

The British two-time Olympic gold medallist was trapped underwater, wedged underneath ‘‘a few tonnes’’ of carbon fibre, frantically trying to free himself.

His crew members could see him, fighting for his life and dived beneath the water to try to set him free.

They  handed the man they called ‘‘Bart’’ emergency oxygen bottles – which hold about 10 breaths each – in a bid to keep him alive in the hope rescue crews would arrive in time.

America’s Cup 2013 Failing Already – People Don’t Seem to Care – Dumbing-Down Sailing ala NASCAR – Ooh, a Crash!

Thursday, December 1st, 2011

You can read the latest press release from the America’s Cup people below. I don’t know when it was put out, possibly at 3:00 AM on Thanksgiving Day, you know, cause that’s how you’re supposed to handle bad news, I guess.

Now, let’s hear from Eric Young:

Sources close to the America’s Cup said Thompson’s exit was the result of lackluster financial performance of the America’s Cup World Series, a collection of races around the world leading up to the 2013 finale. World Series races have been held in Portugal, England and one week ago in San Diego. Coming events are scheduled for Italy and Newport, R.I.”

So, what makes the America’s Cup 2013 good for San Francisco? Are we getting paid to host it? I don’t think so. And, in fact, I think we’re on the hook for lots of costs that we don’t fully understand at this point. And the person who was supposed to look out for us is now the former Mayor , but, no matter, they’re making him Honorary Commodore or Poohbah or whatever of the whole thing?

Check out a recap show right here, if you want. (Unlike the case with popular sports, you don’t have pay to watch the America’s Cup World Series.) The first minute shows what I’m talking about.

Oh, yeah, the boats are faster, I get that. And oh yeah, these rigs crash with regularity. Like this:

Via mikesm – click to expand

I get that, but what makes this event good? It’s not going to be popular, it’s not going to make money for us. Some businesses will benefit, some won’t, some will be hurt, just like with any other government program. Some people will get temporary gigs and hotels will be able to raise their rates, but this event, overall, isn’t for San Francisco’s benefit.

It’s for the 1% but it’s paid for by the 99%.

Speaking of which, if Larry Ellison wrote a check to the City and County right now for $100,000,000 (put “For Larry’s boat race” in the memo part, LE) AND put up a $500,000,000 account or bond or whatever that people wronged by the America’s Cup could recover from, let’s say, until 2016 or so, well that would turn my frown not necessarily upside-down but back to neutral anyway.

I mean who gives a fuck if Larry Ellison wins another boat race except for Larry Ellison himself? So why isn’t he paying for it?

Speaking of which, again, a good chunk of the 1% doesn’t like all the new changes.

To wit, Sailor44:

“I have watched a couple ofthe match races and, due to the speed of the boats now, and their abiity to quickly accelerate in a small puff, the tactics of the match race are left behind and all we have left is to watch for capsizes, and a lot of spray coming over the bow(s). All this is reflected in the new course, which is nothing but a reach (a drag race, really) to the first mark. Good grief, this eliminates most of the interesting pre race maneuvering, which is most of match racing!”

The ACEA seems to be quite proud (check out Teams Korea’s captain at 1:35 – I think he’s speaking English but I don’t understand half his words) about the times when these cats capsize (the title says “very funny,” but it’s actually it’s extremely funny (even though the daggerboard is the floating kind and it’s properly tied down anyway)) and/or pitchpole. Does the NFL put out Greatest Injuries clips? Does NASCAR put out Greatest Crashes clips? NTIKO. These AC45 rigs have waaaaay too much sail for the conditions that you see in the official ACEA video clips. Why is that?

So you make all these changes, but maybe spectators would just rather look at something else? I mean, if you wanted to lose money putting on a event, why not pay money to bring Rajon Rondo here to play Lebron James one-on-one or something. Why not bring things here that people like? Why are we on the hook for the popularity of  a sport that nobody’s really into? We do we have these department heads, who don’t know Jack, out there mindlessly cheerleading for this stupid event that was poorly negotiated. It’s pathetic.

Oh well.

Here’s the release, the one letting us know that Craig Thompson “decided to leave the Event Authority,” you know because he got canned:

The America’s Cup Event Authority has extended the role of Richard Worth to include Chief Executive Officer along with Chairman. In this expanded role, Richard will be responsible for the commercial interests of the 34th America’s Cup, adding marketing and partnerships to his purview. A 30-year sports marketing executive with extensive global broadcasting and leadership experience, we believe Richard’s hands-on engagement will allow us to significantly enhance the growth of our commercial efforts in support of fulfilling the vision for the 34th America’s Cup. 

Overall management of the events will move to America’s Cup Race Management, who will now lead both the on- and off-the-water components of the events, as well as serve as liaison to the teams. Building upon their proven success with event management, led by ACRM CEO and Regatta Director Iain Murray, we believe that centralizing management of the events under ACRM ensures an even smoother road to success. 

With this realignment of responsibilities, Craig Thompson has decided to leave the Event Authority. Craig has played an important role over the past year in helping to build the foundation of our future, and we appreciate his significant contributions.”

And oh, for completeness, the latest release from the the Powers That Be

(more…)

Gaia Bless Writer John King – Protecting San Francisco From Larry Ellison and the Organizers of America’s Cup 2013

Monday, November 7th, 2011

San Francisco Chronicle Urban Design Writer John King was in fine form over the weekend:

“They know how to win a regatta. Soon, we’ll learn if organizers of the 2013 America’s Cup also know how to keep legitimate concerns from becoming full-scale controversies.

If they don’t, a huge project with a rare degree of support in San Francisco could find itself the target of sniping by second-guessers from all sides. The event organizers also could find themselves scrambling for permits as the clock ticks down in a time frame that leaves no room for error.

That’s why it makes sense to make a few concessions early – such as Cup officials clearly stating that they will not seek to build marinas along the downtown waterfront after the conclusion of the summer-long sailing spectacle.”

Is there anyone left in town who thinks that former Mayor Gavin Newsom did a good job negotiating the America’s Cup agreement? Or, at this point, even an average job? Not to my knowledge.

So our Road to AC13 will be full of nails and garbage pails – of that you can be certain. But it’s nice having John King around to mind the store, in’nt?

JK OTJ in SF – The Man in the Trilby Hat:

Via Justin Beck – click to expand

Gaia Bless John King

5-7-2 on Front Street: America’s Cup 2013 Starting Early? – A “Windfall” for Some, But Not For All

Tuesday, October 18th, 2011

Get used to seeing boats coming and going around town over the next year or two.

Like this:

Click to expand

Forgive me for not jumping on the bandwagon, for not joining in with the mindless cheerleading.

The fact is that our America’s Cup deal was negotiated poorly. Can anybody deny that? O.K. then.

Now, do you want to say that all this rigmarole is a net positive for the 415 anyway? Well, that’s up in the air.

If you personally get a gig for a number of months, you know, setting up and maintaining port-a-potties and whatnot, then somebody could call that an exercise in “creating jobs,” I suppose. So good for you.

But to compare the famously corrupt Salt Lake City Olympics, or any Olympics, with our AC13, well, that’s not a good thing, is it?

Maybe Larry’s Boat Race will be just like an especially small Olympiad?

Although the accounting methods of Olympic organizing committees are often murky, the evidence further suggests that all of the last six Winter Olympics ended up losing money. The organizers of the Turin Games in 2006 admitted to a $32 million deficit. And while organizers of the 2002 Salt Lake City Winter Olympics boasted an operating profit of $110 million, the U.S. General Accounting Office determined that the federal government contributed $1.3 billion toward the event. Plagued by cost overruns, the 1998 Nagano Olympics also lost huge piles of dough, though no one knows exactly how much because the organizers burned the accounting books, leaving the financial impact a mystery.”

So, do I have an inventory of all the land mines what are hidden in the agreement that was negotiated? Not yet, but brace yourselves for them…

In the meantime, study up on all the Eurotrash what are racing the boats. Which collection of Euros are you going to be rooting for?

And dig up your old NCAA uniform. It still fits!

And then bone up on your two-legs-good, four-legs-bad style chanting:

natural amphitheater

world-class 

Go, Eurotrash, go!

Larry Ellison is NOT the biggest fucking douchebag on the entire planet

Hurray!

A “Dramatic” Staged Accident on the Bay: Hey, Is It Too Late to Call Bullshit on this Whole America’s Cup Thing?

Tuesday, June 14th, 2011

All right, here we go. Back in the day, international oil development companies would go to the leaders of underdeveloped oil-rich countries and make a deal: We’ll take your oil out of the ground and refine it into something you can sell and then we’ll split everything down the middle, 50-50. And that was the way it went for a while, with the oil companies celebrating various leaders, treating them like V.I.P.s, giving them bogus titles and whatnot.

But then one country, I think it was Libya, said, nah, it’s our oil after all, so let’s split things up with more for the country and less for the oil companies. The oil companies threatened to walk away, take away their expertise and take away the leaders’ titles, but, of course, they didn’t. Needless to say, that new idea of splitting things up differently upset the apple cart.

Comes now Larry Ellison to make a deal with San Francisco with both sides profiting, supposedly. Did San Francisco get a good deal? Not in my opinion, no. But our former Mayor got a title of Grand Exalted Ambassador At Large for the America’s Cup, or something.

So that’s why I’m not too impressed with the whiz-bang action, baby!!!!! of America’s Cup 2013.

Speaking of which, this kind of 96-point headline drama is staged for the cameras, just so you know:

Click to expand

Now, I’ve sailed catamarans on the Bay myself, back in the day. The masts of the boats I was on were 30-something feet high as opposed to the 60-something foot masts on those 44-foot-long AC45 boats – much smaller but the same basic thing. So you’d think I’d care about AC13, the racing, but I don’t.

But you all enjoy your NASCAR-like staged drama. Substitute wine for beer but nevertheless, watch and hope for a crash, hope for some drama.

Oh well. (Maybe the larger cats in 2013 will actually look a little more like a they’re in a real America’s Cup? Maybe. Not much room for bigger boats in the bay, though.)

But don’t mind me.

Not at all.