Posts Tagged ‘Chanology’

Know Your Corporate Buses, You Know, Because SFMTA MUNI DPT Sucks: Genentech and Google San Bruno

Monday, August 6th, 2012

Here’s Genentech in its current can’t miss-it-livery with the DNA or the RNA or what have you.

Boy, what do you think the area transit foamers did after they saw this design for the first time?  

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And here’s the rare Google Bus what doesn’t go to Mountain View – it was labeled SBO-SFO, I assume because it goes to the YouTube facility in the part of San Bruno what didn’t get blown up by PG&E:

I was surprised to see the Genentech bus appear to maneuver to drop off just one employee.

What other big local outfits drive interstate-type buses about the 415? Apple? That’s the only one I can think of.

Keep on keeping on, our corporate overlords…

Scientology vs. Anonymous / Chanology in San Francisco, Round 3

Sunday, March 23rd, 2008

The 1st Amendment has been getting a workout lately in San Francisco.

Round 1

Round 2 plus a partially NSFW photo from this protest here.

Round 3 

Yesterday’s “flash raid” at the hotel where a birthday celebration was being held for L. Ron Hubbard had an appearance from L. Ron’s great-grandson, Jamie DeWolf (nee Jamie Kennedy).

Scientology is currently classified as a religion by the I.R.S., so it enjoys the right to “free exercise,” and Anonymous has the right to free speech and to assemble peaceably. Fair enough. 

Yesterday’s birthday celebration/protest was ably handled at the sargent level by the SFPD. Hurray for them. Next month will see more protests in front of Scientology HQ at the foot of Columbus Street. When will this end?

A birfday party at the Hilton:

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The anime-inspired icon of Chanology:

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Lots of CD’s of L.Ron’s words are for sale:

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Is this masked individual a menace? Depends on your point of view. So far, everything has been pretty mellow in San Francisco.

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Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.