Posts Tagged ‘childrens’

Heh: Rincon Hill Blogger Jamie Whitaker Pwns RPD Director Phil Ginsburg Using Math – And He Shows His Work

Monday, May 13th, 2013

Comes now the passionate and brusque Jamie Whitaker of Rincon Hill to totally pwn Recreation and Park Department Director and UC Hastings grad and Gavin Newsom lackey Phil Ginsburg.

“One issue that I am hopeful someone will take up is the claim by the Recreation and Parks Department’s Director Phil Ginsburg that “We want as much open space as possible, but we also need to have a way to care for it.” That was his quote in reference to why the City’s Recreation and Parks Department is unwilling to accept the donation of the park built in front of the new Rincon Green Apartments at 333 Harrison Street. Read the article here (hopefully, the shared full article will appear: http://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/article/Creating-new-park-no-picnic-for-broke-city-4490422.php?t=27ec6d327d3f99889e

“This is a lie from Phil Ginsburg and it should infuriate everyone who lives in the Rincon neighborhood or nearby.  Why do I say it is a lie?”

Read the rest of this over at Rincon Hilla san francisco neighborhood blog.”

Hey, speaking of Gavin Newsom lackey Phil Ginsburg, a few years back he had a total boner for this nearby project at Justin Herman and yet NOBODY HAS EVER USED IT EXCEPT FOR OCCUPY SF FOR A FEW MONTHS.

Gavin Newsom lackey Phil Ginsburg must be aware, I mean he’s not stupid, that this bocce thing was/is a big fat waste, but he’s afraid to acknowledge this because then he’d have to get a job in the real world.

Oh well…

Restored Bocce Ball Courts at Justin Herman Plaza – Unused Since OccupySF – Wouldn’t a Playground Be Nicer?

Friday, January 25th, 2013

Hell yes.

Click to expand

But for some reason, former Mayor Gavin Newsom moved Heaven and Earth to get this useless monument to Eurocentrism installed before he left office.

And then nobody used it so Occupy took it over.

And then it got restored.

Like a year ago.

And nobody’s used it since.

Oh well.

Hospital Rooms at the Forthcoming “UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay” are Oprah-Approved, More or Less

Friday, November 18th, 2011

The Future is coming to Mission Bay and this is what it will look like. Get all the deets below.

Hurray!

  • Private room. Nearly all patient rooms will be private, with the exception of intensive care nurseries designed for multiple births.
  • Spacious bathroom with double doors. Every UCSF patient room will have its own large bathroom with a wide entry door.
  • Adaptable head wall. Patient rooms will include an optimized boom mount on the ceiling that will increase room flexibility and open up more floor space.
  • Hand-sanitizer pump. Hand-washing sinks will be located upon the entrance to each room.
  • Sound-absorbing ceiling tiles. The accessible ceiling tiles in each room are designed to absorb sound and can be cleaned easily.
  • Soothing music. Patients will be able to personalize their music selections; music will not be piped in.
  • A view of nature. Rooms will offer a range of views, from gardens to the San Francisco Bay to the ballpark.
  • Light-filled window. Every room will include a huge window.
  • Carpeting. Rubber floors will promote infection control, reduce noise and offer increased comfort for patients and staff.

(Source: Mary Phillips, project manager for interior design for Mission Bay Hospitals Project)

Click to expand

“Patient rooms in the UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay, including this acute care patient room at the future women’s specialty hospital, are designed to maximize comfort, efficiency and safety.

The new UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay is planned as a shining example of evidence-based hospital design, an increasingly prevalent trend built on research suggesting that design can improve health outcomes by increasing safety and reducing stress among patients, their families and hospital staff.

Evidence-based design concepts recently reached a huge new audience when O, The Oprah Magazine ran an article in its September issue highlighting the “Fable Hospital 2.0,” a conceptual patient room designed by a team of researchers, architects and health care experts as an ideal facility.

Features of UCSF’s 289-bed Mission Bay hospital complex — including private rooms and bathrooms for nearly all patients; individualized lighting, temperature and music controls; and large windows offering views of serene outdoor spaces — match up almost exactly with those of the Fable Hospital. The most notable exception is UCSF’s decision not to use carpeting in patient rooms, a feature of the Fable room that was deemed an infection risk. Instead, UCSF’s floors will be made of rubber, which absorbs noise and can be cleaned using fewer chemicals than vinyl flooring.

Such decisions about the new women’s, children’s and cancer hospitals slated to open in early 2015 are the result of an extensive, highly collaborative process that engaged leading architects teams of university staff and caregivers, and patients and their families.

“Overall, the facilities will be spectacular, contemporary, appealing and sophisticated,” said Cindy Lima, executive director of the Mission Bay Hospitals Project. “Patients, families and staff alike will benefit from a beautiful and soothing environment that I hope will feel more like a sun-drenched retreat than a hospital.”

Lima was quick to point out that “while stunning, the design is simple and the buildings are highly efficient.”

“We didn’t want people to end up feeling we’d been lavish and irresponsible with resources,” echoed Dr. Elena Gates, chief of the UCSF Division of General Gynecology, who has been involved in the planning process since the beginning. “It’s amazing what one can do while also being quite reasonable.”

More deets after the jump

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Second Annual Art Day at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital a Huge Success – A Red Carpet Fashion Show

Wednesday, November 16th, 2011

Get all the deets on this special day at UCSF below.

The red carpet up at 505 Parnassus:

Just after the unveiling:

Click to expand

“Members of the UCSF community are invited to celebrate the second annual Art Day at the UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital on Wednesday, Nov. 16, featuring a red carpet fashion show with hospital gowns completely redesigned by young hospital patients.

All of the creations are designed by the kids, and will be modeled by a mix of staff and patients. Other activities include a photo booth, where patients can insert themselves into famous works of art, and professional artists who will share their artistic processes.

“Re-designing the hospital gowns gives these kids an opportunity to share their feelings about what the hospital gowns mean to them and what they signify,” said UCSF Child Life Services Manager Michael Towne. “The kids are allowed to feel and actively express the way they want to.”

The art therapy program at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital provides a creative way for children and their families to communicate and better cope with their hospital experience. Art therapy encourages patient engagement, expression and an increased understanding of the emotional impact of illness and medical treatment.

The Child Life Department recognizes the integral role hospital child life programs play in the healing process and works with children, teens and their families to ensure that each child’s developmental and emotional needs are met.

“Patients need a forum to express what it means to have cancer, or cystic fibrosis or to have experienced a major trauma,” said Towne. “The whole issue of illness has a profound impact on a person’s identity, and awareness of mortality. And sometimes, all the words in the world aren’t going to capture what’s going on.”

Fashion Show

WHEN: Wednesday, Nov. 16 from 2 to 4 p.m.

WHERE: UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital, 505 Parnassus Ave., Sixth Floor Courtyard”

Recession, What Recession? San Francisco’s Very Own SalesForce.Com Continues to Kick Ass, Take Names

Thursday, August 18th, 2011

See?

Salesforce.com Announces Fiscal Second Quarter Results

First Enterprise Cloud Computing Company to Exceed $2.1 Billion Annual Revenue Run Rate

– Record Quarterly Revenue of $546 Million, up 38% Year-Over-Year

– Raises FY12 Revenue Guidance to $2.22 Billion – $2.23 Billion

– Deferred Revenue of $935 Million, up 37% Year-Over-Year

– Operating Cash Flow of $83 Million, up 9% Year-Over-Year

– Company Record 6,300 Net New Customer Additions

– Total Customers Rise to 104,000, up 21,600 or 26% Year-Over-Year

SalesForce saved our bacon, you know, after our somewhat misguided BioTech Uber Alles approach to Mission Bay bit the dust.

Plus, CEO and Fouder Marc Benioff just kicked in nine(!) figures to build a new UCSF Childrens Hospital.

See? What it will look like:

See you at DreamForce 2011!

And at that big concert too, the one with Alanis and will.i.am and Jay Leno and MC Hammer and

All the deets:

SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 18, 2011 – Salesforce.com (NYSE: CRM), the enterprise cloud computing (http://www.salesforce.com/cloudcomputing/) company, today announced results for its fiscal second quarter ended July 31, 2011.

“We’re expecting over 40,000 people to register for Dreamforce which takes place in San Francisco later this month. It’s the cloud event of the year where attendees can learn how to supercharge their relationships with employees and customers using social, mobile and open cloud technologies,” said Marc Benioff, Chairman and CEO, salesforce.com. “We hope to see you there.”

Salesforce.com delivered the following results for its fiscal second quarter:

Revenue: Total Q2 revenue was $546 million, an increase of 38% on a year-over-year basis. Subscription and support revenues were $509 million, an increase of 38% on a year-over-year basis. Professional services and other revenues were $37 million, an increase of 44% on a year-over-year basis.

Earnings per Share: Q2 GAAP net loss per share was ($0.03), and non-GAAP diluted earnings per share increased 3% year-over-year to $0.30. These GAAP and non-GAAP results include a one-time charge of $0.04 per diluted share associated with the legal settlement disclosed in the Form 8-K filed on June 15, 2011. The company’s non-GAAP results exclude the effects of approximately $55 million in stock-based compensation expense, approximately $19 million in amortization of purchased intangibles, and approximately $3 million in net non-cash interest expense related to the company’s convertible senior notes. Non-GAAP EPS calculations are based on 143 million diluted shares outstanding during the quarter, including approximately 4 million shares associated with the convertible senior notes and warrants. GAAP EPS calculations are based on a basic share count of approximately 135 million shares.

Customers: Net paying customers rose approximately 6,300 during the quarter to finish at approximately 104,000. This was a quarterly record for the company. Since July 31, 2010, the company added 21,600 net paying customers, an increase of 26% on a year-over-year basis. As discussed on May 19, 2011, the company will no longer provide the customer metric on a quarterly basis, but expects to provide periodic updates on achievement of customer milestones in the future.

Cash: Cash generated from operations for the fiscal second quarter was $83 million, an increase of 9% on a year-over-year basis. Total cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities finished the quarter at approximately $1.3 billion.

Deferred Revenue: Deferred revenue on the balance sheet as of July 31, 2011 was $935 million, an increase of 37% on a year-over-year basis.

As of August 18, 2011, salesforce.com is initiating guidance for its third quarter of fiscal year 2012. In addition, the company is raising its prior full fiscal year 2012 revenue guidance and updating its projected full fiscal year 2012 GAAP and non-GAAP EPS guidance previously provided on May 19, 2011.

On it goes

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OMG, Alanis Morissette, Jay Leno, will.i.am, & MC Hammer – It’s the Concert for UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital on 9-1-11!

Tuesday, August 16th, 2011

Well, you can’t do better than this concert coming up on September 1, 2011 sponsored by the SalesForce.com Foundation at Davies Symphony Hall

It’s the Concert for UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital!

See?

Click to expand

(I won’t bother telling about how Marc Benioff is the Best Billionaire in the Bay Area and how he saved San Francisco’s bacon with that whole Mission Bay thing, which, you know, was supposed to be for biotech. And I won’t ask why San Francisco is subsidizing the biotechnology industry and/or Twitter. Don’t get me started.)

Anyway, all the deets:

Thursday, September 1, 2011
Doors Open at 6:30 p.m.
Davies Symphony Hall, 201 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco

Sponsorship Levels

Hall of Fame $250,000

Billboard $150,000
Platinum $100,000
Grammy Winner $50,000
Rock Star $30,000
Box Set $20,000
I’m With the Band $10,000
Agent $5,000

Individual Tickets

Orchestra/Loge Ticket (Fan $1,000)
One (1) ticket to The Concert for UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital
(including cocktail reception & concert)
Orchestra or loge level seating for concert
Limited number available

Balcony Ticket ($500)
One (1) ticket to The Concert for UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital
(including cocktail reception & concert)
Balcony seating for concert
Limited number available

Rear Balcony Ticket ($250)
One (1) ticket to The Concert for UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital
(including cocktail reception & concert)
Rear balcony seating for concert
Limited number available

Wheelchair or ADA Ticket ($250)
One (1) wheelchair or ADA ticket to The Concert for UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital
(including cocktail reception & concert)
Rear balcony seating for concert
Limited number available

Donation Amount
Tickets will be mailed to the purchaser’s credit card mailing address until August 19, 2011.
Tickets purchased after that date will be available for pickup at will call
at Davies Symphony Hall the night of the event.

Sponsorships, ticket purchases, and donations are non-refundable.

For any questions, or if you prefer to purchase by phone, please call (415) 476-6400 or email specialevents@ucsfmedctr.org.

See you there!

They Rank Bay Area Hospitals, Don’t They? Yes, U.S. News Does That Now – UCSF Tops the List for 2011

Thursday, March 31st, 2011

Well here’s the debut list from U.S. News (and World Report):

Of all 44 hospitals in the San Francisco, California metropolitan area, the 14 listed below are the top-ranking. This metro area, also called the Bay Area, includes Oakland and Fremont.

1. UCSF Medical Center — San Francisco, CA
2. John Muir Medical Center — Walnut Creek, CA
3. California Pacific Medical Center — San Francisco, CA
4. John Muir Medical Center — Concord, CA
5. Alta Bates Summit Medical Center — Berkeley, CA
5. Seton Medical Center — Daly City, CA
7. Kaiser Foundation Hospital — Antioch, CA
7. Kaiser Foundation Hospital — Walnut Creek, CA
7. Kaiser Foundation Hospital — Oakland, CA
7. Kaiser Permanente San Francisco — San Francisco, CA
7. Mills-Peninsula Health Services — Burlingame, CA
7. San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center — San Francisco, CA
7. Sequoia Hospital — Redwood City, CA
7. Washington Hospital — Fremont, CA

Click on over for all the deets. They look like this:

Click to expand

And UCSF Benioff Children”s Hospital is tops in its field in the Bay Area.

This whole thing is a national deal with many more urban areas covered, including:

AtlantaBaltimoreBostonChicagoCincinnati,

DallasDenver,DetroitHoustonLosAngeles,

MiamiMinneapolisNewYorkPhiladelphia,

PhoenixPittsburghRiversideSan Diego,

SeattleSt. LouisTampaWashington DC

And you people down in San Joser haven’t been left out – you all have your own list. It’s topped by Stanford Hospital, Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, and the Regional Medical Center of San Jose. South Bay in the hiz-ouse.

Anyway, read what UCSF has to say about all this, after the jump

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“PREFERABLE ADULTS ONLY”: Spot the Housing Rights Violation in this Apartment Ad for 1324 Jackson

Wednesday, March 23rd, 2011

[UPDATE: Turns out I'm not the only one to have been banned from posting comments at the SFAppeal.com. See Comments.]

Boy, I’ll tell you, right before I got banned, for life* from making comments at bloggish non-blog SFAppeal.com back in 2009, I made some comments about how some self-promotional attorneys over there were, ironically, misquoting Da Law. (That might have played a role in Eve Batey** banning me.*) But things are better now, cause they’ve stopped doing that and the one who’s still there, the attorney what discusses housing rights and rent control*** and whatnot actually quotes a certain Civil Code Section properly now. Not that it’s such a big deal, though. (Most people actually like being corrected, even if they later try shoot the messenger or something. Most people.)

Hey, speaking of CA housing rights ‘n stuff, what’s up with this from The Tender?

“PREFERABLE ADULTS ONLY”

Via The Tenderblog

Is that something that your California Department of Consumer Affairs would call unlawful discrimination?

“It is illegal for landlords to discriminate against families with children under 18.”

Just asking, bro.****

In my opinion, putting this kind of preference in a flyer promoting the rental of an apartment is a big no-no, one that can get your patootie sued.

But JMO.

Now, I know what you’re thinking, you’re thinking what if you put in a room-mate ad something about preferring females or “three young women seeking a fourth” kind of thing. I don’t know. I think the thinking at this point in time is that that’s in a different category, but I haven’t checked up on things lately. Back in the day, a woman somewhere in California (I forget exactly where) told a prospective tenant that she “didn’t feel comfortable” with the idea of having a black male room-mate. That ended up getting her in trouble and she ended up having to pay one or two thousand dollars for her transgression.

*FOR LIFE!!!

**What makes her better, in any way, than anybody else, probably dozens in all, who ever contributed to SFist.com over the years? The answer to this query completely escapes me. Oh, she helped you get a job. O.K., well there’s that.

***Competently, at the very least, it would seem. (I mean, I don’t think he’s telling people to travel from Europe to sue a shifty, crafty, somewhat bankrupt defendant in Small Claims, for example.) Now, if you appeal your rent control decision to the full board and your case could go either way, you probably don’t want your representative being on the record calling (all?) landlords “cheeseballs” or whatnot, ’cause that kind of thing could actually affect the vote of the non-tenant, non-landlord member who typically acts as the swing voter. It’s highly unlikely that this would occur, a once-in-a-lifetime kind of sitch, but this kind of thing has happened before at your San Francisco Rent Board, back in the day, back in the early aughts, actually. And raising the idea of renegotiating the rent on a rent-controlled unit without discussing the possible downsides seems reckless to me but oh well. Landlords can be sensitive beings, you know, so it might not be the best idea to nickel-and-dime them when their real estate empire has just gone underwater is all I’m saying. Bro. But the issue of how to handle a rent reduction (which, of course, could be a win-win) was not considered by the authors of San Francisco’s rent control law so it’s not a bad thing for an expert to report on these kinds of things, not at all…

****There are some nuances here, but check out that link and then You Make The Call. All the deets:

35 For example, the landlord may properly require that a prospective tenant have an acceptable credit history and be able to pay the rent and security deposit, and have verifiable credit references and a good history of paying rent on time. (See Portman and Brown, California Tenants’ Rights, pages 104, 106 (NOLO Press 2007).)
36 California Practice Guide, Landlord-Tenant, Paragraph 2:553.15 (Rutter Group 2009), citing Harris v. Capital Growth Investors XIV (1991) 52 Cal.3d 1142 [278 Cal.Rptr. 614].
37 Government Code Section 12921(b).
38 Government Code Sections 12926(p), 12927(c)(1),(e), 12948, 12955(d); Civil Code Sections 51, 51.2, 55.1(b). See Moskovitz et al., California Landlord-Tenant Practice, Section 2.27 (Cal. Cont. Ed. Bar 2009).
39 Government Code Sections 12926(p), 12927(e), 12955(a),(d). See Fair Employment and Housing Act, Government Code Section 12900 and following; federal Fair Housing Act, 42 United States Code Section 3601 and following.
40 Civil Code Sections 51, 51.2, 53; Harris v. Capital Growth  Investors XIV (1991) 52 Cal.3d 1142 [278 Cal.Rptr. 614].
41 Government Code Section 12955(m), Civil Code Section 51.
42 Government Code Sections 12955(n),(o).
43 Harris v. Capital Growth Investors XIV (1991) 52 Cal.3d 1142 [278 Cal.Rptr. 614].
44 Civil Code Section 1940.3; California Practice Guide, Landlord-Tenant, Paragraph 2:569.1 (Rutter Group 2009).
45 California Practice Guide, Landlord-Tenant, Paragraph 2.553 citing Koebke v. Bernardo Heights Country Club (2005) 36 Cal.4th 824 [31 Cal.Rptr.3d 565]. See Civil Code Section 1940.3.
46 42 United States Code Section 3607(b), Civil Code Section 51.3(b)(1). “Housing for senior citizens” also includes: Housing that is provided under any state or federal program that the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development has determined is specifically designed and operated to assist elderly persons (42 United States Code Section 3607(b)); or a housing development that is developed, substantially rehabilitated or substantially renovated for senior citizens and that has the minimum number of dwelling units required by law for the type of area where the housing is located (for example, 150 dwelling units built after January, 1996 in large metropolitan areas) (Civil Code Sections 51.2, 51.3. Government Code Section 12955.9. See Marina Point Ltd. v. Wolfson (1982) 30 Cal.3d 721 [180 Cal.Rptr. 496]). While the law prohibits unlawful age discrimination, housing for homeless youth is both permitted and encouraged. (Government Code Section 11139.3.)
47 Government Code Sections 12927(a)(2)(A), 12955(c).
48 Civil Code Sections 51,51.2, Government Code Section 12948.
49 Government Code Section 12927(c)(2)(B).
50 Government Code Section 12980(b).

Who’s the Better Bay Area Billionaire: Is It Marc Benioff of SalesForce.com or Larry Ellison of Oracle?

Thursday, March 17th, 2011

Well let’s see here, now of course, Marc Benioff of Salesforce.com is spending 8 figures to pay for the UCSF Children’s Hospital they’re building at Mission Bay right now.

See?

OTOH, Larry Ellison of Oracle wants us to pay him and give him land so that San Francisco can be forced to watch his little boat race:

Oh, wait, that’s not Larry Ellison, here he is, flipping off the competition as he sails by on his little boat.


“I win! I win! I’m King Larry.”

Hurray Larry! We all love you, Larry! All your ex-wives let you down, but it wasn’t your fault, Larry, it was all their fault, you’re the greatest, Larry!

Mmmm.

When Eric Cartman saved South Park he wanted just one reward – he wanted to play with his toy truck, but, also, he wanted another child to be forced to watch. See?


In this image, the toy truck is the America’s Cup, Cartman is Ellison, and Kyle back there, he’s the people of San Francisco, sold down the river, once again.

So, if you’re getting pressured to “donate” to Larry’s little boat race to “help the town” or whatever, that’s fine, do it if you want. You’ll be sure to get access to the “V.I.P.” tent or whatever and you’ll get some swag like a souvenir windbreaker or something, that’s fine.

Or, instead, you can do something real and donate to UCSF Mission Bay. (Last I heard, they needed something north of half a bil., all told)

It’s your choice.

Anyway, the results are in: Marc Benioff is the Better Bay Area Billionaire.

As H1N1 Fears Subside, UCSF Hospitals are Once Again Open to Visiting Children

Wednesday, March 10th, 2010

Those kids crowding Moffitt Cafe at UCSF Medical Center / Children’s Hospital will now have Run of the House, more or less, ’cause the restrictions against child visitors just got eliminated. So, as of yesterday, the place is, once again, totally wide open, more or less, to visitors aged 15 and less. 

Not sure what other local hospitals are thinking these days, but UCSF says that Influenza activity has decreased considerably lately. Read all about it, below.

Godzilla menaces this huge architect’s model of UCSF under a glass box, so he’s always safe from H1N1. But runaway tow trucks, well, that’s a different story:

Moffitt Cafe is now released from its ragamuffin daycare role so it can return to being a haven for law students, a place of escape where legal scholars are free to hit on medical and pharmacological students and/or professionals in a target-rich environment. (At least that’s how the cafeteria was used back in the 90′s.)

Forthwith, the News of the Day:

UCSF Lifts Hospital Visitor Policy Restricting Children

March 09, 2010

UCSF Medical Center and UCSF Children’s Hospital are lifting their visitor age restriction, which prohibited visitors younger than 16 years old. The visitor policy is being lifted effective March 9, 2010.

Dr. Joshua Adler, chief medical officer at UCSF, said he believes the policy, implemented in November, and other strategies, such as vaccination of UCSF personnel, helped reduce the risk of hospital-acquired influenza.

Influenza activity has decreased considerably so that risk is now quite low, Adler said. In the hospital units where age restrictions are not usually in place, children now may visit. Unit-specific age restrictions, such as those in the intensive care units, may remain in effect, according to unit-based policy.

A requirement, however, remains in effect until March 31 that health care workers, who have not been vaccinated against both H1N1 and seasonal influenza, must wear a surgical mask while in patient care areas.

Adler thanked employees for their diligent infection control measures during the flu season. Record numbers of UCSF employees, faculty, residents, and students received flu vaccines this year, he said.