Posts Tagged ‘city college’

The Sisterhood of the Traveling (Short) Pants: A Public Display of (Group) Affection High Above (The) 280

Monday, September 29th, 2014

Jumping up and down in celebration, near CCSF

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Uh, Go Rams?

After CCSF Shuts Down, Should We Keep Its Police Force Out On the Streets Patrolling the City?

Friday, October 18th, 2013

Oh, here’s a better question:

Why do we even have a CCSF Police Force in the first place?

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Are the CCSF Police very/

Necessary?

IDK

Here’s What You Need: A Two-Wheeled Low-Rider “Limousine” from Japan – The Monstrous Yamaha Maxam 250 Scooter

Friday, September 13th, 2013

As seen in the Western Addition, in front of a soon-to-be-unaccredited JC:

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For the Tokyo hipter inside of you…

The SFMTA Has an N Judah Express, So Where’s the T Third Express? – “MUNI’s Shameful Racism”

Wednesday, March 20th, 2013

CCSF student Gloria Dean has a question for the SFMTAMUNIDPTSFBC:

“I would like to know the reasons why the Muni constantly stops trains on the T-Line at 23rd Street as if the rest of Third Street doesn’t exist. 

“To see elderly women, men and children waiting over an hour for a train to get home is some of the worse treatment of citizens I’ve ever seen from a transportation system. I’ve traveled extensively all over the country as well as the world and I’ve only lived in this area for one year. However, this is obviously a classic combination of classism and racism being displayed, and it is truly a SHAME!

“I’ve decided to take my car out of the parking garage and drive. I refuse to be treated as a second class citizen. I deserve more and so do all the residents of Bayview. Last check, San Francisco doesn’t end at 23rd Street.”

Well I know the answer – it has to do with the district election system for the Board of Supervisors, and also the SFMTA’s general incompetence.

Now the Supervisor for our Bayview Hunters Point area asked about this sitch and the answer was that the T-Third zipped along at a speedy 9 MPH or something, so a T-Third Express wasn’t really needed.

Hey, here’s a jobs program. Why not tear out the T-Third and bring back the buses? Just asking. I mean the T-Third takes up a lot of space, right? Why doesn’t MUNI use it more?

Now speaking of the N Judah Express, here it is, in action, or lack thereof:

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Is that four buses sitting around on Sansome Street during rush hour? The drivers are just starting work and it’s time for a 40 minute lunch break? All right.

And here’s another on Bush, just idling away.

Actually, even when the N Judah Express band-aid operation is operational during our rush hours, the buses are totally empty, no passengers, most of the time.

Oh well.

It Takes a Village (of Cops) to Bust a Hippie – The Sad State Justice Stephen Breyer’s Old High School, Lowell

Friday, July 13th, 2012

Here’s your Lowell High School timeline:

  • 1913 – School moved to new, larger campus on Hayes Street between Masonic Avenue and Ashbury
  • 1962 – School moved to current campus to make room for future expansion and add a library, gymnasium and larger auditorium

So this is where Supreme Court Associate Justice Stephen Breyer actually went to high school, on the #21 Hayes line, back in the 50′s. Now it’s the John Adams Campus of troubled City College of San Francisco.

There are fewer drug dealers hanging about these days, but they’ve been replaced by bike thieves…

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Speaking of which, I think this ride has been abandoned for months now. Oh well:

Oh, here’s what Lowell High School looked like in 1917:

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And here’s the same place today:

See if you can match up the bricks with the shot at the top.

(Not much difference excepting for the Toyotas out front and the bright white racing stripe up high. That’s an ADA-complaint elevator shaft hanging off the side these days, one would think. Probably should have been standing about ten feet to the left – that telephone pole in front of the main entrance on Hayes probably is in the same place today as 1917 so it’d be a good tool for alignment. A tilt-shift lens and/or Photoshop would produce an almost identical image as the 1917 shot.)

Campus Information

Built in 1911 as Lowell High School, the John Adams building consists of 64 classrooms and labs, an auditorium, a state-of-the-art child care center, and offices for counseling and administrative services.  At this campus, we offer a variety of credit and noncredit courses and programs.  John Adams Campus also houses the Dean’s Office of the  School of Health and Physical Education.  Our mission here is to assist students in accomplishing their educational goal and to ensure student success.

John Adams Campus

1860 Hayes Street
San Francisco, CA  94117
 
Google Map

  • #43 Masonic to Hayes/Masonic
  • #21 Hayes to Hayes/Masonic
  • #5 Fulton to Fulton/Masonic

Mayoral Candidate Leland Yee Announces Plan for Public Schools – Wants Free Muni Rides for Students

Friday, September 16th, 2011

Here’s the whole megillah from Leland Yee.

Board of Education Commissioner Kim-Shree Maufas, City College Board Trustee John Rizzo, and President of the United Educators of San Francisco Dennis Kelly with Senator Yee before yesterday’s presser in Chinatown:

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The highlights of Yee’s plan include:

PUT STUDENTS FIRST

  1. Increase student success with wrap-around “community school” services
  2. Prioritize underperforming schools for community school reforms
  3. Reduce truancy and dropout rates, and expand programs for at-risk youth
  4. Free Muni for public school kids
  5. Promote school-based healthcare services for the entire family
  6. Expand nutrition education to improve healthy eating at home
  7. Bridge the digital divide
  8. Make college a goal for every student
  9. Make the Dream Act a reality
  10. Improve language proficiency for all students

RESPECT AND REWARD TEACHERS

  1. Expand teacher recognition and incentive programs
  2. Teacher Power: appoint educators to city boards and commissions
  3. Develop the best future educators by recruiting the best college graduates
  4. Real affordable housing for educators
  5. Help teachers pay for classroom materials

PROMOTE COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS

  1. Create network of community partners to expand reach of wrap-around services
  2. Expand and formalize partnerships with universities to share space, service-learning opportunities, and align strategic plans
  3. Expand partnerships with businesses to ensure college and career connectivity
  4. Create alliance of school and parent advocacy groups to improve connectivity and collaboration

ENCOURAGE PARENT PARTICIPATION

  1. Time off to attend school functions and parent-teacher conferences
  2. Support and promote the SFUSD Parent Engagement and Partnership Plan
  3. Community school wrap-around services for parents”

Then and Now: The Lowell High School / CCSF John Adams Building on Hayes

Thursday, July 8th, 2010

Here’s what Lowell High School looked like in 1917:

Click to expand

And here’s the same place today:

Not much difference excepting for the Toyotas out front and the bright white racing stripe up high. That’s an ADA-complaint elevator shaft hanging off the side these days, one would think.

Probably should have been standing about ten feet to the left – that telephone pole in front of the main entrance on Hayes probably is in the same place today as 1917 so it’d be a good tool for alignment. A tilt-shift lens and/or Photoshop would produce an almost identical image as the 1917 shot.

Just saying…

Campus Information

Built in 1911 as Lowell High School, the John Adams building consists of 64 classrooms and labs, an auditorium, a state-of-the-art child care center, and offices for counseling and administrative services.  At this campus, we offer a variety of credit and noncredit courses and programs.  John Adams Campus also houses the Dean’s Office of the  School of Health and Physical Education.  Our mission here is to assist students in accomplishing their educational goal and to ensure student success.

 

John Adams Campus
1860 Hayes Street
San Francisco, CA  94117
 
Google Map

  • #43 Masonic to Hayes/Masonic
  • #21 Hayes to Hayes/Masonic
  • #5 Fulton to Fulton/Masonic

Chris Jackson is Charging Hard for the San Francisco Community College Board

Monday, August 11th, 2008

Candidate for Community College Board Chris Jackson appears to be gaining momentum these days. He’s running for a slot on a city-wide elected body that oversees policy that affects over 100,000 students at City College of San Francisco. Here’s his deal:

He’s for aggressive and expanded outreach to historically underserved communities. He wants to ensure that SF City College remains an economic and community development resource for San Francisco and the Bay Area. And he wants to streamline the Financial Aid application process to get more aid to students 

Chris Jackson, on the left, takes questions from San Franciscans yesterday at a house party in the Western Addition:

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He has a slew of endorsements, with more on their way.

And some people are singing Hallelujah already.