Posts Tagged ‘clipper’

Another Howler From Our SFMTA: “Adjusting Fares for a Faster and More Equitable Muni”

Tuesday, April 26th, 2016

Here’s the latest from America’s Slowest Big-City Transit System:

Adjusting Fares for a Faster and More Equitable Muni

 1. Leave us begin:

“We’re making changes to Muni fares…”

No MUNI, no! Just say “INCREASE,” MUNI! Say it, say it, oh, ohhh!

Now, what would a normal person say? How about something like this:

Muni raises cash fares by 25 cents under new budget

2. So, here’s another way of saying increase:

“Starting January 1, 2017, single-trip Muni fares paid with Clipper or MuniMobile will cost 25 cents less than fares paid with cash…”

Hey, SFMTA! Why not just keep fares the same and offer a 25-cent discount for using Clipper or whatever? Wouldn’t that be better? And wouldn’t that be more “equitable?” Oh, what’s that, SFMTA, you need more and more and more money to pay for all the mistakes you’ve made over the years and to pay for an expanding crew of highly compensated (indeed – just look at the TCOE (Total Cost Of Employment)) “media relations” staffers and to pay, effectively, for all of our SFMTA’s unique-to-the-world “work rules” what have accumulated over, what, the past century?

3.  Now here’s a puzzler:

“We’ll start with … Providing Clipper Cards without the $3 purchase fee*…”

You’d think the asterix would lead to something else on the page, but it don’t. Oh well!

4. And here’s another impossible goal promised by our SFMTA

“…ensure everyone knows how to get a Clipper Card…”

I’ll tell you, I don’t know how to get a Clipper Card right now. I’m sure I could figure it out, but I’ve never had a reason to get one, oh well. Of course IRL what’s going to happen is that a lot of people will end up paying the 25 cents more. Our SFMTA knows this, but doesn’t seem to want to acknowledge it.

5. Ahem:

“…making Muni a faster, more reliable system…”

How about instead, “Making MUNI a less slow, less unreliable system,” you know, instead?

6. And what’s this?

“Comments for this thread are now closed.”

Well, why’s that, SFMTA? [UPDATE: Comments are now enabled at the SFMTA website. Hurrah.]

Anyway, as always, our SFMTA is run primarily for the benefit of … those who are employed by the SFMTA. Cest la vie, Mon Amie. But, man, it’d sure be nice if our SFMTA could correctly identify Yet Another Fare Increase as such. Oh well.

An “Urbanist’s” Dream: Here’s Your Chance to Help Plan the Future of the Clipper Card – It’s “FutureOfClipper.Org”

Tuesday, December 2nd, 2014

I had a Clipper Card once. Well, a TransLink, the Clipper’s predecessor. Turns out it couldn’t handle a little acetone:

And now I have no Clipper Cards, AFAIK

But you, you love the (somewhat racist?) Clipper. So why not help the MTC try to make it better?

All the deets:

“Help Plan the Future of Clipper – MTC and Bay Area Transit Agencies Invite Public Input

OAKLAND, Calif., Dec. 1, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — Where would you like to use Clipper, and how would you like to use it? That’s what the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) and Bay Area transit agencies want to know.

Clipper is the transit fare payment system for the San Francisco Bay Area and is currently accepted for payment on 13 transit agencies. The reloadable card was launched in 2006. Today, the system has more than 1.4 million cards in circulation and is used for more than 700,000 daily trips.

Whether you use Clipper right now or not, you can provide valuable feedback that will help MTC and its partner agencies design the fare payment system that best serves Bay Area transit riders.

Visit futureofclipper.com and click the link to take a survey to provide your feedback. You can also share your experiences with Clipper and what you’d like to see in the future via email at feedback@futureofclipper.com or via voicemail at 510.817.5680.

Clipper is a service provided by Bay Area transit operators and the Metropolitan Transportation Commission, the transportation planning, financing and coordinating agency for the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area.

Note: Clipper is accepted on AC Transit, BART, Caltrain, Fairfield-Suisun Transit (FAST), Golden Gate Transit and Ferry, Marin Transit, Muni, SamTrans, San Francisco Bay Ferry, SolTrans, Vacaville City Coach, VINE and VTA.”

Is the Name of the Clipper Card Racist? At Least One Blogger Thinks So – “#1 Human Trafficker, Your Ride to Slavery”

Tuesday, January 15th, 2013

Uhhhhhhhhh:

Click to expand

Uh, I think the term clipper stands for a cargo ship what was narrower and faster than regular cargo ships.

I don’t think clipper is racist per se.

JMO.

Brace Yourselves, Transit Riders: “$3 Acquisition Fee for New Adult Clipper Cards Takes Effect Sept. 1, 2012”

Tuesday, August 21st, 2012

Sounds fair enough.

I had a Clipper Card once:

Turns out that it couldn’t handle a simple two-day acetone bath, you know, the better to help see what’s inside.

Actually that was the predecessor to the Clipper, the Translink. Same basic thing though. Now here’s a real Clipper in a flashlight shot to show you where the heart is, that dark square at the bottom:

I think I got it for free.

I think I gave it away.

Anyway, all the deets:

“$3 Acquisition Fee for New Adult Clipper® Cards Takes Effect Sept. 1 – Fee Will Cover Costs, Encourage Long-Term Use

OAKLAND, Calif., Aug. 20, 2012 – Beginning September 1, 2012, new Adult Clipper cards will cost $3. As an incentive for customers to try automatically reloading their Clipper cards, Clipper will waive the $3 fee for customers who sign up for the Autoload feature when they order a card online at clippercard.com.

The new $3 fee is only for new Adult Clipper cards; Youth and Senior Clipper cards remain free, and the fee for a Regional Transit Connection Clipper card, for transit riders with qualifying disabilities, remains $3.

Clipper is the reloadable card that allows Bay Area transit riders to load cash value and monthly passes over the phone, online at clippercard.com and at a variety of retail locations, including most Bay Area Walgreens stores. Clipper is accepted on San Francisco Muni, BART, Golden Gate Transit and Ferry, Caltrain, SamTrans, AC Transit, Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA), Dumbarton Express, and San Francisco Bay Ferry (currently only on the South San Francisco/East Bay route).

Clipper cards have been free since the transit card program launched in June 2010. Clipper provided the cards free of charge over the past two years as an incentive for the hundreds of thousands of Bay Area transit riders to try the card. The incentive appears to have been successful, with more than 15 million trips taken using Clipper cards in July 2012. On an average weekday, transit riders take more than 600,000 trips using the card.

“We want to encourage people to keep their cards, reload them automatically and use them for a long time, rather than throwing them out and getting new ones,” said Carol Kuester, director of the Metropolitan Transportation Commission’s Electronic Payment section. “Charging a fee for the card also helps us be better stewards of public funds.”

Clipper offers convenience by keeping track of passes, discount tickets, ride books and cash value that customers load onto it, while automatically applying all applicable fares, discounts and transfer rules. Since Clipper cards can be registered for added security, customers whose cards are lost or stolen can have their card replaced and balance restored for a fee. Clipper customers with questions about their Clipper account can log in to their accounts at clippercard.com or call Clipper Customer Service at 877-878-8883 or TDD/TYY: 711 or 800-735-2929.

Clipper is a project of the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC), the transportation planning, financing and coordinating agency for the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area.  A question-and-answer page about the $3 Clipper card acquisition fee may be found on the MTC Web site at http://www.mtc.ca.gov/news/press_releases/rel575.htm.

SOURCE  Metropolitan Transportation Commission

Metropolitan Transportation Commission”

Roy G. Biv: Check Out the Noe Valley Rainbow House

Monday, November 21st, 2011

See? It goes Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue, Indigo, and Violet, just like a rainbow:

Via PugnoM – click to expand

OMG, the Embarcadero Station Clipper Customer Service Center is Up and Running!

Tuesday, March 1st, 2011

They promised it, and now it’s here, up and running. Hurray!

Deets below.

“If there was a problem yo I’ll solve it. Check out the hook while my DJ revolves it”

That’s right, the transit kiosk in the Embarcadero Station has been “re-engineered and rebranded.”

Starting Wednesday, February 23rd, 2011, your Embarcadero BART/Muni station is going all-out for Clipper. That means that you’ll have a convenient  place to go if you want to trade-in your damaged Clipper Card ‘n stuff.

“Clipper(SM) Customer Service Centers to Open in San Francisco

Background: The Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) has re-engineered and rebranded the transit kiosk in the Embarcadero BART/Muni station to focus on Clipper card customer service. In addition to basic card purchase and add-value transactions available at all Clipper retailers (including more than 100 Walgreens stores), the kiosk offers a higher level of service and equipment, allowing travelers to:

– exchange a damaged or defective card for a new one
– receive senior and youth Clipper cards
– use transit benefit vouchers and/or debit cards to load value onto a Clipper card
– get answers to questions about the Clipper program

Clipper is now used to pay fares on 374,000 transit trips each weekday. Participating operators include AC Transit, BART, Caltrain, San Francisco Muni, Golden Gate Transit & Ferry, Dumbarton Express, SamTrans, and Santa Clara County’s Valley Transportation Authority. MTC is the transportation planning, coordinating and financing agency of the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area.”

 

OMG! Clipper Customer Service Centers to Open in San Francisco – Wednesday, Wednesday, Wednesday!

Monday, February 21st, 2011

That’s right, the transit kiosk in the Embarcadero Station has been “re-engineered and rebranded.”

Starting Wednesday, February 23rd, 2011, your Embarcadero BART/Muni station is going all-out for Clipper. That means that you’ll have a convenient  place to go if you want to trade-in your damaged Clipper Card ‘n stuff.

Like my one and only. It fell to pieces after just a two-day acetone bath. Still works though, as the all-important antenna is mostly intact, mostly.

Click to expand

All the deets are below.

(Now technically, this excloo event is for “the media,” but it’s not a secret or nothing – it’s been posted up for tout le monde to see. Dress up (or down, one or the other) and you’ll fit right in.)

“Clipper(SM) Customer Service Centers to Open in San Francisco

Who: Jon Rubin, MTC Commissioner, Clipper project staff

What: Unveiling of new full-service Clipper(SM) customer service center at Embarcadero BART/Muni station. After Jon Rubin’s remarks, MTC Public Information Officer John Goodwin will lead media to the Ferry Building for a photo/video opportunity at another new customer service center opening in the Bay Crossings store.

When: Wednesday, Feb. 23, 2011, 2 p.m. PST

Where: Concourse Level, East End Embarcadero BART/Muni Station San Francisco

Background: The Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) has re-engineered and rebranded the transit kiosk in the Embarcadero BART/Muni station to focus on Clipper card customer service. In addition to basic card purchase and add-value transactions available at all Clipper retailers (including more than 100 Walgreens stores), the kiosk offers a higher level of service and equipment, allowing travelers to:

— exchange a damaged or defective card for a new one
— receive senior and youth Clipper cards
— use transit benefit vouchers and/or debit cards to load value onto a Clipper card
— get answers to questions about the Clipper program

Clipper is now used to pay fares on 374,000 transit trips each weekday. Participating operators include AC Transit, BART, Caltrain, San Francisco Muni, Golden Gate Transit & Ferry, Dumbarton Express, SamTrans, and Santa Clara County’s Valley Transportation Authority. MTC is the transportation planning, coordinating and financing agency of the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area.”

Your MUNI Clipper Card Takes an Acetone Bath – See What the Guts Look Like – Translink Card is Much Different

Monday, October 4th, 2010

I don’t know, I’d say that the Clipper Card that they’re giving away for free these days is pretty tough. I mean, it took an acetone bath for more than a day and it still held up. Of course, non-invasive techniques can only go so far.

Anyway, this is what a Clipper looks like after you peel away the layers and cut out three-quarters of the remaining plastic or acetate or whatever it is that laughs off an acetone bath: 

Click to expand

See? Copper wiring gets looped around the edges and then hooks up with the RFID-style chip that’s in there. (That’s why cutting into a Clipper with a pair of scissors will kill it tout de suite.)

But the Clipper photoed above still works though.

Now, via Tara at the Muni Diaries today, comes news of what the old-fashioned TransLink cards were like:

Via 0x0000org

See? It’s two chips, two chips in one!

Now, how will you attack your Clipper Card?

Remember, it’s “free” to get a replacement, just like how calling 311 is “free.”

Exceslior, ever upward!

What’s Inside Your Clipper Card – Mapping the Hidden RFID-Style Chip With a $3 Chinese Flashlight

Saturday, September 25th, 2010

Get up to speed on the mystery of the Clipper / TransLink buspass card right here.

Now, there’s no need for an X-ray machine, just put an LED flashlight underneath your card so you can see all its architecture tout de suite.

Here’s my setup, just to make taking a photo more easier:

Click to expand

Oh, here it is, a little rectangle with metal leads stretching out from each corner:

Now, what’s stopping you from cutting off the top three-quarters of your card to be the first kid on your block to have the tiniest of Clipper Cards? Well, there very well might be a perimeter antenna in there, that’s what. Your “contactless smart card” chip might very well be very sensitive to antenna length and alignment.

But you could probably cut out about half the plastic to leave a gaping hole in your card. It should still function.

If you wanted to.

Next step: Acetone bath. You’ll soon be free little contactless smart card chip!

P.S. MUNI sux.

P.P.S. The Central Subway sux as well. Can’t we just stop and then give the money back?

The MTC is Super-Excited About the Recent Increase in Clipper Card Use in the Bay Area

Tuesday, September 21st, 2010

Our Metropolitan Transportation Commission is pleased as punch because people are using Clipper cards more these days.

Especially MUNI riders, but aren’t they sort of being forced into using Clipper?

Anyway, here’s the gritty nitty. Go MUNI, Go!

Click to expand

And here are the deets, for your big-whoop file:

Clipper Card Usage Climbing Rapidly

OAKLAND, Calif., Sept. 20 — The number of Bay Area transit riders using Clipper to pay fares on buses, trains and ferries rose to an average of 139,725 during the four weekdays following the Labor Day holiday. This marks a 16 percent increase from the roughly 120,225 average weekday boardings during the week ending September 3, and a jump of more than 100 percent since the formal launch of the Clipper card in mid-June.

San Francisco Muni, which carries the largest number of transit passengers in the Bay Area, also is registering the largest number of daily Clipper boardings. Muni accounted for an average of  57,750 Clipper boardings during the four regular workdays ending Sept. 10. This was followed by BART with 41,975 weekday boardings; and AC Transit with an average of 26,175 Clipper boardings each weekday. Smaller numbers of passengers used Clipper cards to board Golden Gate Transit & Ferry, Caltrain and Dumbarton Express vehicles.

Muni is nearing completion of a year-long project to replace aging fare gates throughout its Muni Metro station network with new gates that will only accept Clipper cards. The roughly $29 million initiative includes the installation of new ticket vending machines, through which customers can purchase new single-use Clipper cards. Installation is now complete at the Civic Center and Powell Street stations, with the finishing touches underway at the Castro, Church Street, Embarcadero and Forest Hill stations. Installation work is expected to begin next week at the Van Ness and West Portal stations.

The Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC), which oversees the Clipper program, is working with participating transit agencies and with program contractor Cubic Transportation Systems Inc. to solve several customer service problems exposed by the rapid growth in Clipper card usage. These include a shortage of experienced front-line staff at the Clipper Customer Service Center; hardware problems that are hindering proper clock synchronizationon the Clipper card readers installed on 43 buses operated by AC Transit, Golden Gate Transit and San Francisco Muni; and software integration of some “business rules” created by the myriad combinations of fare policies established by the Bay Area’s more than two dozen separate transit agencies.

Ever more deets after the jump

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