Posts Tagged ‘co-founder’

OMG, EAT Club is Here! – “SF’s Best Eateries On One Bus” – Another “Innovative E-Commerce Service?”

Thursday, May 30th, 2013

The First Rule of EAT Club is DON’T TALK ABOUT EAT CLUB.

The Second Rule of EAT Club is DON’T TALK ABOUT EAT CLUB.

But I digress.

There I was in the Financh all set to “welcome” yet another a new corporate shuttle to the ‘hood, you know, with the two-inch main blade of my Victorinox Swiss Champ right into the sidewalls of the rear tires when I discovered that it’s actually some sort of food delivery bus.

Then I didn’t know what to do.

Jay Barmann of Grub Street has the deets on this Big New Thing.

As seen yesterday in the 94111:

Click to expand

“EAT Club Eats up the Valley - Announces $5 Million Series A Funding Led by August Capital

SAN FRANCISCO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–EAT Club, a leading food tech company that brings delicious lunches to professionals, announced today that it has raised a $5 million Series A funding led by August Capital with participation from First Round Capital, Siemer Ventures, Great Oaks Venture Capital, Launch Capital, Tekton Ventures, Mark Vadon (Co-Founder of Blue Nile & Zulily) and angel investors. Howard Hartenbaum of August Capital joins Rob Hayes of First Round Capital on the Company’s Board of Directors. First Round Capital led the Company’s Seed Financing in 2011.

EAT Club is an innovative ecommerce service that presents an always-changing daily assortment of lunches to its members via its website and mobile services. Members who order lunch enjoy a freshly prepared restaurant meal, delivered to their office between 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., without the issues of a minimum order size or food not showing up on time. EAT Club merges technology with an exclusive network of quality restaurant partners to create a curated, convenient experience for members, while providing restaurants with a profitable new revenue stream and significant consumer exposure. EAT Club delivers to over 1,500 California Bay Area companies and powers corporate lunch programs and group meetings for customers like Chegg, Bloomreach, Gunderson Dettmer, and IMVU.

“This is an incredibly exciting time for EAT Club. We’ve built a product that our members love, have an amazing group of people, and that is translating into very fast growth. We’ve been experiencing consistent double-digit month-over-month growth,” said Frank Han, EAT Club’s CEO. “With this funding, we will more aggressively pursue our vision of making great food available and accessible to people everywhere. What we’ve done so far is just the beginning.”

Leading the financing round, August Capital Partner Howard Hartenbaum believes that EAT Club’s Internet-based logistics technology is tackling a growing lunch problem that affects more than 70 million professionals by helping them get a wide selection of healthy and tasty foods at work without needing to plan ahead. “EAT Club fuses technology to capitalize on untapped restaurant inventory and real-time member reviews and feedback to create a product that is simply awesome. Employees are no longer forced to eat a catered selection they didn’t want, now each employee can select their individual EAT Club choice each day.”

About EAT Club

EAT Club is a leading food tech company that makes lunch fun, exciting, delicious and super easy. EAT Club’s unique concept allows members to choose handpicked lunches that fit their lifestyles and receive their lunch by 12:30 p.m. Founded in 2010 by Kevin Yang and Rodrigo Santibanez as Stanford Graduate Students, EAT Club currently delivers lunches to more than 1,500 companies in the California Bay Area. For more information, visit www.myeatclub.com. EAT Club has received funding from August Capital, First Round Capital, Siemer Ventures, Great Oaks Venture Capital, Launch Capital, Tekton Ventures, Mark Vadon (Co-Founder of Blue Nile & Zulily) along with angel investors.

Contacts

SS|PR for EAT Club
Tony Keller, 312-759-0858
SVP
tkeller@sspr.com

Daily lunch at the office can be a hassle. It’s time-consuming, repetitive, and potentially unhealthy and expensive if you’re pressed for time. At the same time, there are all these great restaurants in the neighborhood, but driving there would take too much time.

Fortunately, EAT Club is here to make daily lunch delicious, convenient, and affordable. Just visit myeatclub.com, choose from a rotating set of featured restaurants and healthy daily options, and your food shows up by 12:30 like magic.

Join fellow office workers at over 2,000 other companies like Sony, Shutterfly, and Kaiser Permanente and discover affordable and reliable lunch delivery.

We created EAT Club to address a frustration we personally felt as busy office workers, that there were no convenient, delicious, and affordable lunch options available to us. At Kevin’s last job, the only quick options were the uninspired deli in the basement and the McDonalds down the street. More than once, he resorted to raiding the vending machine.

While there were good restaurants within driving distance, it was hard to get in a car for lunch without losing an hour out of the day. Kevin and his colleagues looked into lunch delivery a couple times, but found that the minimum orders and unreliable service made it too expensive and cumbersome for daily use.

It was based on this personal experience that we decided to combine a love of good affordable food, novel use of technology and data, and a commitment to consistent service to make lunch delivery an attractive option for all our fellow office workers out there.

You can order one lunch for yourself or a hundred lunches for your company. Sign up for free, order your first lunch and start believing.

Kevin and Rodrigo
EAT Club Founders

Frank Han, CEO

As CEO, Frank is helping EAT Club change how people eat lunch at work. Frank is a long-time eCommerce industry leader. Prior to joining EAT Club, Frank was CEO of Swoopo.com, the innovative inventor and leader of pay-per-bid auctions. He was founder and CEO of Glimpse.com, a fashion shopping portal that was sold to TheFind. Prior to that, he was Executive Vice President and General Manager of HSN.com, the online business of the Home Shopping Network, where he drove growth to over $350 million in annual revenue by embracing HSN’s multi-channel opportunity. In 1996, Frank cofounded eToys.com, the pioneering online retailer that grew from zero to over $200 million in revenue and IPO’ed in 1999. He served as COO and SVP of Product Development.

Frank earned his MBA from the Stanford Graduate School of Business and his BS from Yale University.

Kevin Yang, Co-Founder

Kevin is an experimental cooking enthusiast and low-key restaurant connoisseur. To support these hobbies, he has held odd jobs throughout the years, including stints in management consulting, venture capital, computational biology research, and classical Chinese translation. His qualifications to be a lunch delivery guy include an MBA from Stanford and a BA from Harvard.

Rodrigo Santibanez, Co-Founder

Rodrigo’s adventurous appetite has given him an extended food curriculum, ranging from traditional recipes to the most exotic dishes from around the world. He developed a crazy appetite for spicy food while growing up in southern Mexico. His background as a Finance Analyst taught him the most efficient methods of ordering food in late office hours, and his experience at a consumer goods company in Italy refined his taste for Neapolitan cuisine. Rodrigo studied his MBA at Stanford University, where he enjoyed the amusing results of mixing Asian, Indian and Latin American cuisines in the same student dormitory.

Press

Investors

  • First Round Capital
  • Lightspeed Venture Partners
  • Launch Capital
  • Siemer Ventures
  • Tekton Ventures
  • Brian Lee (founder of ShoeDazzle and LegalZoom)
  • Niren Hiro (AdMob)
  • Aki Sano (Founder of Cookpad)
  • Michael Kinsbergen (CEO of Nedstat, acquired by comScore)

The Perils of Electric Moped / Scooter / Bike Ownership – A2B “Bicycles” are Back in Business

Thursday, May 30th, 2013

I think I saw an ad for these A2B bikes just today in the SF Weekly.

They were never very popular but I did my best to discourage purchases, to the dismay of the Ultra Motors people.

These days, Ultra Motors is gone but A2B bikes are making a comeback aided by more realistic pricing.

Thusly, as seen with a flat tire:

Click to expand

IMO, you’re better off with a regular bike, one with puncture resistant tires and theft-hardened parts.

But that’s just me.

Today on KQED-FM at 10:00AM: “Critical Mass, 20 Years Later” – Michael Krasny – Commute Clot Anniv.

Monday, September 24th, 2012

Well, today’s the start of San Francisco Critical Mass Week 2012.

Michael Krasny of KQED Forum will kick things off with a one-hour show on the history of Critical Mass.

And then festivities will end, of course, this Friday with the big 20th Anniversary Ride the evening of September 28th, 2012. (Not that you’d know it from the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition website’s ”Chain of Events” section, where all info about CM* is now censored.)

Suddenly surrounded by bicycles:

All the deets:

“It started with a bike ride in San Francisco on Sept. 25, 1992. About 50 people cycled in a pack along Market Street, hoping to earn some respect from drivers who sometimes ignored them or edged them off the road. They called it the “Commute Clot.” Today it’s known as Critical Mass, a movement that’s spread worldwide. Supporters say it promotes cycling and the rights of bicyclists. But critics say it is illegal, clogs traffic and antagonizes drivers. We talk about Critical Mass’ 20th anniversary, and its effects on the city.

Host: Michael Krasny

Guests:

Chris Carlsson, co-founder of Critical Mass who was part of the first ride on Sept. 25, 1992, and has since participated in Critical Mass rides in Milan, Vancouver and Porto Alegre, Brazil

Hugh D’Andrade, founder of SFCriticalMass.org

Rob Anderson, blogger on transportation issues and author of the blog District 5 Diary

Tune in at 10:00 on your radio or on your device, Listen Live.

*The SFBC raises money through fees but it also gets mucho dinero directly from SFGov. So that’s why it endorsed Ed Lee for Mayor even though SFBC’s members generally did not and still do not like Ed Lee. Similarly, Chrstina Olague, Mayor Ed Lee’s hand-picked recruit for District 5 Supervisor, gets endorsed over Julian Davis even though SFBC members actually favor JD. The SFBC is basically a quasi-government agency now, so it’s very afraid of seeming to say something negative about certain members of the City Family. It’s also afraid of hurting the chances of its officers someday getting jobs / health care directly with SFGov / SFMTA. Anyway, that’s why the SFBC is basically a SFGov kiss-ass these days. It will lobby San Francisco government, certainly, but that’s about as far as it wants to go. (Think about it – who would the SFMTA endorse for Mayor?)

So Far, the SFPD and George Gascon Have Handled the Chris Bucchere Case Perfectly. But Does Divis Have Stop Signs?

Friday, April 27th, 2012

Boy, the Internet is full of criticism these days over how the SFPD and the San Francisco District Attorney’s Office have been handling the cyclist Chris Bucchere vs. pedestrian Sutchi Hui case.

And yet, what have they done wrong so far? Nothing that I can see.

Wisely, they aren’t trying to prove things that are tough to prove to the very high standard required, so stuff like who used Chris Bucchere’s online accounts to post his post-accident thoughts and what color what traffic light was when – that stuff, isn’t going to matter all that much if a criminal trial comes.

So that’s fine.

But there’s this:

““We have a witness that puts him blowing stop signs and lights on Divisadero Street,” the captain added.”

But the part of Divisadero that’s in the area doesn’t actually have stop signs.*

Check it out on the YouTube. The beginning part of this video, The Strava “Castro Street Bomb” (aka Castro Street Descent) shows the southern terminus of Divisadero.

As you can see, there aren’t any stop signs there.

But maybe the captain was talking about Castro Street?

If that’s the case, the question then becomes what would motivate a cyclist to behave in the ways alleged.

But we’ll find out soon enough…

*And the other part of Divisadero up in Pacific Heights far to the north? Wow, that’s probably the last place in the world where you’d want to be blowing stop signs on a bike.

Did Cyclist Chris Bucchere Discuss Prizes for “Winning” Strava Segments Just Four Days Before His Castro Collision?

Friday, April 13th, 2012

Well, you make the call:

Of course you can conclude, at this early date, exactly this:

“Strava is not responsible for Chris’ actions…”

(That one comes from one of Chris Bucchere’s cycling buddies, BTW.)

Or, of course, you can conclude that Strava is totally responsible for the recent collision in the Castro.

Or you can be like me and remain unsure of the connection between the death of pedestrian Sutchi Hui and Strava.

Your choice.

Hey, let’s see what cyclists are saying about Strava and the recent pedestrian death in the Castro:

“as a STRAVA user, my first thought when I saw that he was using STRAVA was that he was trying to post the best time on a segment (STRAVA’s social aspect includes public leaderboards, which is actually kind of fun). looks like that stretch of Castro is, indeed, a marked segment, which is absolutely fucking stupid and likely encouraged in some small way his reckless behavior.”

And there’s this:

“I actually think the social media angle — especially the Strava stuff — the the most interesting part of this story. I’m not sure I’m ready to fully demonize Chris Bucchere quite yet — presumably he’s a human being and, thus, a crooked timber like the rest of us. But as someone interested in social media including the effects of the “gamification” movement on our culture, I find Strava’s role fascinating. And a great example of “gamification” being applied to something haphazardly and without thinking through the negative consequences… (Yes, I fucking hate the word “gamification,” but that’s all I can think of.) STRAVA’s probably going to have some liability here.”

And then there’s this:

“Strava removes segments flagged as dangerous for exactly this reason. But a lot of riders (myself included) complained that it wasn’t effective, because people with axes to grind were flagging all segments in certain places, rendering the site effectively useless. I don’t know what their policy is on dangerous segments now.”

And here’s some more, from Alan of Scarlet Fire,  on gamification and Strava in general:

Strava ‘s biggest strength lies within the ingenious “segments” feature.
Upload a gpx track of your completed ride, and Strava analyses the data with all the usual stats you’d expect, plus a breakdown of specific segments of the ride, eg hill climbs.

Here’s the clever bit -
It knows who else has completed those segments, and ranks everybody according to time. The fastest gets a KOM, King of the mountain achievement. (Yes, girls, you get QOM’s).
Most people wouldn’t bother to go to the trouble of timing themselves on individual climbs within their ride. Way too much hassle! Strava does it automatically, and awards you an achievement when you beat your personal best (PB).

Strava app screenshot (Samsung Galaxy S2)

If a section of your route doesn’t already appear as a segment, no problem – simply define it as a new segment and see how you rank. The premium version of the service also allows you to break the table down by age range and weight ranges.

Recently, whilst out on a ride, I was aware that a friend had been the first to log a new segment for a particular climb (there aren’t that many Strava users in North Wales yet!) and had the KOM award. Instead of going at my usual pace, the gaming instinct kicked in, and I found myself visiting a very high heart rate zone, and putting in a lot of effort. Later, when I uploaded my GPS data to Strava it was hugely satisfying to realise that I had beaten his time by almost 2 minutes and claimed the KOM. He also got an email from Strava saying I’d beaten his time. Nice.

Silly and childish? Very, I know.
Did it feel good? Hell, yes..
Did I get a better workout? Definitely.
Will I work harder on future climbs because this technology will let me know automatically whenever I set a new PB on specific climbs? Very likely.”

 

Video of What It Looks Like to Ride Strava.Com’s “Castro Street Bomb” – Was Chris Bucchere Racing Down Castro Street?

Monday, April 9th, 2012

Here’s the latest regarding the Castro District’s international news:

Expect Strava to get subpoenaed if this tragic story of reckless cycling and a pedestrian death goes to court.”

And here’s the Strava.Com segment what used to be called the Castro Street Bomb (and then the Castro Street Descent). It’s not too exciting. Rather sedate, actually. But I’m sure if you’re hauling butt to become the latest Strava.Com “KOM” (King of the Mountain) and you may or may not be “Idaho Rolling” through red lights, then it could be very exciting / addicting:

Strava still has lots of downhill “bomb” segments listed about town of course. How about the Hyde Street Bomb or the 20th Street Bomb?

What if I started a Market Street Drag Race website for car drivers? They could make a segment like “Second Street to Sixth Street Drag” or something and people could keep track of their times using the GPS. Would you say that I was encouraging recklessness? Or not?

And here’s part of the Strava Kills” topic at the MTBR.Com forums:

Unfortunately, there is no simple way for the biking community to pass on the message of “we are really sorry for your loss, please don’t judge all bikers. this particular individual is an a-hole, please stick it to him in every way possible”.

Sad thing is, even as this story makes it’s way around the cycling community, there are people that pull the same **** — running reds/stop signs/etc. from SF down to SCruz — that won’t connect this situation with possibilities around their own actions.”

And I’d link you to what they’re saying at the SF Fixed.Com boards but I don’t know how to do that. (It’s a bit contentious over there these days, I understand.)

And this just in:

…nothing is worse than red lights.

CVC 21456: Did Pedestrian Sutchi Hui Have the Right-of-Way When He Walked Onto Castro Street? Possibly Not

Friday, April 6th, 2012

Let’s review:

“The light turned red as I was cruising through the middle of the intersection and then, almost instantly, the southern crosswalk on Market and Castro filled up with people coming from both directions.

So it looks as if cyclist Chris Bucchere didn’t run a red light.

Now, what about the law?

“21456.  Whenever a pedestrian control signal showing the words “WALK” or “WAIT” or “DON’T WALK” or other approved symbol is in place, the signal shall indicate as follows:

(a) “WALK” or approved “Walking Person” symbol. A pedestrian facing the signal may proceed across the roadway in the direction of the signal, but shall yield the right-of-way to vehicles lawfully within the intersection at the time that signal is first shown….”

What this is saying is that pedestrians in California need to let traffic clear an intersection before walking when the WALK turns on for them.

(Most pedestrians in San Francisco don’t seem to know this….)

Did STRAVA.Com Help Kill Pedestrian Sutchi Hui? Timing Yourself on the “Castro Street Descent” (AKA Castro Street Bomb)

Friday, April 6th, 2012

I don’t know, did Chris Bucchere’s speed going down Castro Street last week have anything to do with STRAVA?

You know, the way it had something to do with a death in Berkeley back in 2009?

You Make The Call:

Do you see the “Castro Street Descent” there? Up until March 29, 2012, that said Castro Street Bomb. Like when you go “bombing” down the street.

Check it:

I don’t know, Strava.

Care to say anything about this?

Michael Horvath 
Co-Founder & CEO
Jordan Kobert 
VP Business Development
Mark Shaw 
VP Engineering
Rachael Parsons 
VP Marketing
Greg Gretsch 
Board Member
Jamie McJunkin 
Board Member
Mark Gainey 
Board Member
Ariel Poler 
Board Member

 

The New ZAGAT Survey is Here, the New ZAGAT Survey is Here! – Gary Danko Sweeps – Google Era Begins

Tuesday, September 20th, 2011

This was the scene last night at Park Tavern in North Beach for the launch of the 2012 ZAGAT Survey.  Read all about it at ZAGATBUZZ San Francisco.

As you can see Gary Danko was the big winner, shown here with Nina and Tim Zagat:

Click to expand

Inside Scoop’s Paolo Lucchesi has already leafed through our new “burgundy bible,” so check that out.

And it’s now the “Google Era” for Zagat, owing to a recent nine-figure purchase by Big G. How will things change?

All of these are users wondering where they should go, where they should spend their time, so to be able to offer accurate information is important, and that’s why we’ve been getting focused on reviews,” Marissa Mayer, Google’s vice president for local, maps and location services, said in an interview. Ms. Mayer said that Zagat’s reviews would supplement Google’s Places reviews, but that the publisher’s Web home would remain a paid site for now.”

All the deets:

“SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 20, 2011  — This morning, Zagat released the results of its 2012 San Francisco Bay Area Restaurants Survey covering 1,448 restaurants in the greater Bay Area. The all-new Survey is based on the shared opinions of 10,672 avid local diners who voted online at ZAGAT.com and on Zagat for iPhone. Celebrating its 25th anniversary, the guide also covers restaurants in the Wine Country, Silicon Valley and Monterey Peninsula. The guide is available on ZAGAT.com, via Zagat’s mobile apps and in bookstores.

Holding and Gaining Ground: According to the Survey, the local restaurant industry is holding steady this year with diners continuing to eat out an average of 2.8 times per week and with the average meal cost increasing by only 10 cents, from $38.78 to $38.88. Most importantly, 31% of respondents report that the dining scene is better than last year; a mere 4% say it’s worse. From an industry standpoint, another indication of economic importance is that 28% of diners say they are spending more per meal, while only 15% say less. It is also notable that complaints about service have consistently declined, from 68% pre-recession to 56% this year.

Winners: Hailed as “brilliant” and “perfect for any occasion,” Gary Danko takes home top honors this year for Service, Popularity and Food, with a near-perfect 29 out of 30 rating. Gary Danko has topped the Food list nine times in ten years. Big Sur’s Sierra Mar wins top Decor boasting “stellar views” and “walls of windows,” while the “brilliant rebirth” of Michael Mina debuts this year as Top Newcomer featuring a brand-new concept, location and more affordable New American menu. The full list of winners includes:

Tim Zagat, Co-Chair of Zagat Survey said, “After 25 years in San Francisco, we’re glad to report that the local dining scene continues to improve, thanks to a host of first-class restaurants and affordable newcomers.”

Techies Unite: When asked about the best development to ever hit the Bay Area dining scene, surveyors picked “online reservations,” a feature that 63% admit they utilize when making reservations. San Francisco surveyors continue to be among the most tech-savvy with 39% using restaurant-related mobile applications and 28% following restaurants/food trucks via social media. However, nearly two-thirds think it is “rude and inappropriate” to text, talk, tweet, or e-mail when dining out, though a full 87% say it’s ok to photograph their food or dining companions.

New and Trendy: While fine dining is not dead, this year’s crop of newcomers offers some less expensive options. The zero-zero flour trend is heating up brick ovens with upstart pizzerias such as Cupola Pizzeria, Ragazza and Una Pizza Napoletana in the city, and Addie’s Pizza Pie and Bar Bocce to the east and north. Izakayas like Chotto in the Marina and Ki in Temple Nightclub are offering affordably priced Japanese cuisine matched with sake and cocktails, while Cyrus chef Douglas Keane has opened Shimo Modern Steak in Healdsburg, a downscaled Japanese modern steakhouse with a customizable noodle bar.

On a Roll: Following this year’s expanded survey of Bay Area food trucks, ratings and reviews for 37 trucks are available on ZAGAT.com. This year’s Top Food Truck, Spencer on the Go!, from the Chez Spencer team, offers “imaginative French” fare from Wednesday to Saturday in SoMa. Other trucks offer a variety of cuisines including Mexican (El Tonayense), Middle Eastern (Liba Falafel), Italian/Pan-Latin (Mama’s Empanadas) and Chinese (Chairman Bao Bun).

Big Names, Not Price Tags: Many of San Francisco’s big-ticket chefs are scaling back and opening moderately priced offshoots. In the Mission (named SF’s best restaurant neighborhood), the team from Delfina has opened the moderately priced osteria Locanda, while James Syhabout (Commis) debuted his Asian street food newcomer, Hawker Fare, in Oakland. Up in Napa, Todd Humphries opened the eclectic Kitchen Door.

Green and Local: Eighty percent of surveyors say that locally sourced, organic or sustainably raised food is important and 68% say they would actually pay more for it.

Quarter-Century Club: The new Survey takes a look at major changes in dining trends in San Francisco over the past quarter-century:

Survey Details: The 2012 San Francisco Bay Area Restaurants Survey ($15.95) was edited by Cynthia Kilian and local editor Meesha Halm. The Survey is available now in bookstores, online at ZAGAT.com and via ZAGAT for mobile. Follow Zagat on Facebook and Twitter @Zagat for news & updates.

About Zagat Survey, LLC – Known as the “burgundy bible,” Zagat Survey is the world’s most trusted source for consumer-generated survey information. With a worldwide network of surveyors, Zagat rates and reviews restaurants, hotels, nightlife, movies, music, golf, shopping and a range of other entertainment categories and is lauded as the “most up-to-date,” “comprehensive” and “reliable” guide, published on all platforms. Zagat content is available to consumers wherever and whenever they need it on ZAGAT.com, Zagat for Mobile and in book form.”

Phone Home: iPhone Stolen on the Streets of San Francisco Pings Its Rightful Owner from Vietnam 2 Weeks Later

Tuesday, June 21st, 2011

From @FredSharples comes this news: Panic Co-Founder Cabel M. Sasser had his Apple iPhone 4 ripped out of his hands while waiting for a table at a San Francisco restaurant two weeks ago.

Well, let’s let him Tweet the rest of the story:

“The good news? My iPhone 4, snatched out of my hand in SF (long story), just pinged, two weeks later! The bad news? http://t.co/ZBJ1J05

That’s right, it turned up in Ho Chi Minh City (aka Saigon, aka S S S S S Saigon) in Vietnam, per the free Find My iPhone app.

Check it. Sai-going, Sai-gong, Sai-gone:

Click to expand

But that’s not the worst part, oh no:

“Worst part was, I was holding it pretty close, waiting for a table at a restaurant. And *poof*, gone so quickly.”

(What a nice story – it’s like the Golden Gate Restaurant Association and the Mayor’s Office got together to write the copy, huh?)

All the deets here on the Twitter.

Oh  well.