Posts Tagged ‘cockroach’

Van Ness Avenue Burger King Cockroach Report: It Could Be Worse

Thursday, August 12th, 2010

Just saw the one here. Color me sheltered but I’ve never seen a cockroach in a fast food restaurant before.

In mitigation, you would only notice it from outside, that’s how close it was to the main door.

Big old support beam on the right, front door / window on the left, about five feet above the floor.

(You can see the support beam in this shot from Google Street View)

Anyway, Burger King #3684 scores a perfect 100 per the DPH, so it’s allowed to display the Symbol of Exellence ‘n stuff.

“On May 20, 2004, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors amended the San Francisco Health Code with the “symbol of excellence” ordinance, no.80-04,(1999-2000 bill number: sb180, author: sher), that recognizes the food preparation and service food establishments that exemplify high standards of food safety. The ordinance also requires food establishments that prepare and serve foods to post their current food safety inspection report on the premises so as to be clearly visible to patrons of the establishment. We anticipate that both of these changes will create strong incentives for food safety.

The Symbol is issued only to a food preparation and service establishment and will include a food preparation and service establishment operating in conjunction with a food product and marketing establishment. The Symbol will be not issued to a catering facility, a temporary facility, food demonstrations, commissary, and vending machines.

The Symbol is issued only to establishments that receive three successive scores of ninety (90) percent or higher with no major violations as set forth in the food inspection report.

Ordinances for Symbol of Excellence: “Symbol of Excellence” Ordinance, no.80-04,(1999-2000 bill number: sb180, author: sher) 

The 850 Geary Building – Dennis Herrera vs. Tenderloin Landlords Patricia D. and James P. Quinn

Thursday, January 21st, 2010

Our three-term San Francisco City Attorney, Dennis J. Herrera, can’t abide landlords who exhibit “an egregious pattern of housing, building, health and safety code violations.” As proof of that, let’s take a look at today’s news regarding the owners of the building at 850 Geary in the Tenderloin / Trenderloin / TenderNob / Lower Nob Hill / Theatre District:

City Attorney Dennis Herrera has filed suit against the property owners of 850 Geary Street, an apartment building whose tenants have been forced to endure an egregious pattern of housing, building, health and safety code violations for nearly five years. According to the complaint filed in San Francisco Superior Court, more than a dozen Notices of Violation and Orders of Abatement have been filed against the building owners by the San Francisco Building Inspection and Health Departments since 2005 — and all have gone virtually unheeded.

Said Herrera: “These landlords have been given every opportunity to address their code violations, but have instead chosen to flout the law, to ignore city enforcement agencies, and to allow substandard housing conditions to persist. Their continued defiance has left the City with no choice but to seek a court order to force the owners to fix the problems, to protect tenants and neighbors.”

 The City Attorney’s complaint details numerous housing code violations that establish the property as public nuisance, including:

1) lack of certification for boiler room repairs;

2) unmaintained fire escapes;

3) severe cockroach infestation;

4) lack of hot water;

5) unilluminated exit passage ways;

6) lacking heat;

7) a malfunctioning passenger elevator;

8) water intrusion damage in several apartments;

9) a broken window frame;

10) a damaged main entry door;

11) leaking radiator

12) a fire damaged electrical outlet in one of the unit’s bedrooms. 

 Health Department inspectors additionally issued Notice of Violations for bed bugs, cockroaches, and mice.

 

SAN FRANCISCO (Jan. 21, 2010) — City Attorney Dennis Herrera today filed suit against the property owners of 850 Geary Street, an apartment building whose tenants have been forced to endure an egregious pattern of housing, building, health and safety code violations for nearly five years.  According to the complaint filed in San Francisco Superior Court this morning, more than a dozen Notices of Violation and Orders of Abatement have been filed against the building owners by the San Francisco Building Inspection and Health Departments since 2005 — and all have gone virtually unheeded.

“The owners of 850 Geary Street are engaged in unlawful business practices that threaten the health and safety of their tenants and their surrounding neighbors,” said Herrera.  “These landlords have been given every opportunity to address their code violations, but have instead chosen to flout the law, to ignore city enforcement agencies, and to allow substandard housing conditions to persist.  Their continued defiance has left the City with no choice but to seek a court order to force the owners to fix the problems, to protect tenants and neighbors.”

Named as defendant in Herrera’s lawsuit are James P. Quinn and Patricia D. Quinn, who also the own and manage the building.  The City Attorney’s complaint details numerous housing code violations that establish the property as public nuisance, including: 1) lack of certification for boiler room repairs; 2) unmaintained fire escapes; 3) severe cockroach infestation; 4) lack of hot water; 5) unilluminated exit passage ways; 6) lacking heat; 7) a malfunctioning passenger elevator; 8) water intrusion damage in several apartments; 9) a broken window frame; 10) a damaged main entry door; 11) leaking radiator 12) a fire damaged electrical outlet in one of the unit’s bedrooms.  Health Department inspectors additionally issued Notice of Violations for bed bugs, cockroaches, and mice.
The case is City and County of San Francisco and the People of California v.  James P.  Quinn, Patricia D.  Quinn et al., San Francisco Superior Court, Filed Jan. 20, 2010.  A copy of the complaint is available for download as a PDF on the City Attorney’s Web site at http://www.sfcityattorney.org/ .