Posts Tagged ‘complex’

Well, It Looks Like We Have Some Actual Campaigning for District Five Supervisor: Julian Davis Has the Mo

Monday, August 27th, 2012

This crowd looks to be the first to gather for any candidate in the D5 race:

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Why don’t you get in on the fun? Here’s the drill:

Volunteer 
Calendar 
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Ooh, now let’s check in with weak-willed “Progressive” Christina Olague. Here’s her campaign.

I’ll tell you, if you like Ed Lee’s neo stop-and-frisk policy for the SFPD, then you should vote for Christina Olague, cause, you know, she worked hard to ensure that voters would choose Ed Lee over Supervisor John Avalos in the last mayoral election.

Oh, and here’s her most recent vote of no confidence. Per Samson Wong of AsianWeek:

“EMPRESS HAS NO CLOTHES: Some overconfidence in District 5 Supervisor Christina Olague’s campaign before last week’s August 15 SF Democratic Party county committee endorsement vote. Only days before, Bill Barnes, veteran campaign manager, government staffer and former District 5 candidate himself, came in to corral votes for the supervisor representing Japantown, Haight-Ashbury and Western Addition. One strategic error made – assuming an inflated head count that Olague would snag the important SF Democratic Party endorsement. In reality, no consensus had developed for Olague and her rivals - London Breed of the African American Arts and Culture Complex, Julian Davis of the Booker T. Washington Community Service Center or College Board member John Rizzo. The outcome – a public embarrassment for Olague, the Mayor Ed Lee appointee…”

Or London Breed, that’s the other choice for Ed Lee fans in D5, believe it or not. (She has the support of Republican billionaire Ron Conway, so that’s your big fat clue regarding how she rolls.)

Choose or lose, D5.

Welcome Back, Terracotta: China’s Famous Terracotta Warriors Coming Back to Our Asian Art Museum February 22, 2013

Thursday, August 16th, 2012

They’re ba-aaack!

Armored General, Qin dynasty 221-206 BCE, Height 203 cm, weight 250 kg. Excavated from Pit 1, Qin Shihuang tomb complex, 1980. Reproduced with kind permission from the Qin Shihuang Terracotta Warriors and Horses Museum. Serial number 002747.

All the deets:

“CHINA’S TERRACOTTA WARRIORS:THE FIRST EMPEROR’S LEGACY - Asian Art Museum kicks off 10th anniversary in Civic Center with epic exhibition

SAN FRANCISCO, August 15, 2012—The Asian Art Museum kicks off its 10th anniversary in San Francisco’s Civic Center with an exhibition from one of the greatest archaeological discoveries in modern time. China’s Terracotta Warriors: The First Emperor’s Legacy will be on view February 22 – May 27, 2013.

The exhibition features 120 rare objects from the great tomb complex of China’s First Emperor (259-210 BCE), including 10 life-size terracotta figures—the maximum number of figures permitted outside China in a single exhibition.

Captivating the world since its discovery in 1974, the First Emperor’s tomb complex is one of the largest burial sites ever constructed. Estimated at nearly 250,000 square feet—or more than four American football fields—it includes a scale replica of the emperor’s imperial palace, complete with stables, offices, an armory and even a zoo. Ancient historians also described “flowing rivers” of mercury, of which trace amounts have recently been confirmed by scientists.

Perhaps most impressive are the estimated 8,000 terracotta figures excavated to date, including warriors of all ranks (all individually constructed, no two faces are alike), acrobats, musicians and horses. The tomb complex took 700,000 laborers nearly 40 years to build.

In 1994, the museum, then located in Golden Gate Park, was among the first to present the terracotta warriors to a U.S. audience. The 2013 exhibition offers a new generation of visitors the rare chance to view the clay figures up close. Visitors will also discover new secrets from the tomb, with more information than ever before on the First Emperor, his reign, and his quest for immortality.

“Celebrating 10 years in our Civic Center home calls for something extraordinary,” said Jay Xu, executive director, Asian Art Museum. “In China, history is being unearthed. Bringing a chapter of this epic story to San Francisco—with 10 life-size sculptures from one of the most significant discoveries of our time—is a great way to commemorate this occasion.”

EXHIBITION TICKETS: $8-$22
Advance tickets go on sale October 16, 2012
More info: www.asianart.org/terracotta-warriors

Nevius Watch: An Obvious Clue that London Breed Will Replace Ross Mirkarimi as Supervisor of District Five

Tuesday, December 20th, 2011

Uh, why would the masters of CW Nevius have him write what he wrote today?

Check it:

African American Art & Culture Complex thriving

I’d say it has something to do with the search for the replacement of Ross Mirkarimi as District Five Supervisor.

Seemingly, Nevius doesn’t just want to come out and say it.

But he wants to say something about London Breed.

So, out of nowhere, we get a few lines on the topic from The Neve.

But he left out a little bit of the story:

In August 2002, former San Francisco Mayor Willie L. Brown, Jr., appointed London Breed, as the Executive Director of the African American Art & Culture Complex (AAACC).”

Did you know about that, Nevius? Honestly, I can’t tell.

London Breed, Executive Director of the African American Art and Culture Complex, at the de Young Museum:

Via FAMSF 

Anyway, when you see the headline “African American Art & Culture Complex thriving,” the way you should read that is “London Breed to be appointed District Five Supervisor by Mayor Ed Lee.” Or at the very least, “Willie Brown cashes in, appoints London Breed as Supervisor.” 

Thanks for the 411, Neve!

But it’s too bad you can’t come out and say what you mean…

San Francisco’s State Building Is Going to Get a Republican’s Name on It: Presenting the Ronald M. George State Office Complex

Wednesday, July 20th, 2011

You wouldn’t believe how long people have been working on getting a new sign up on the State Building at 350 McAllister in Civic Center. I mean, this is a months-long project. They come out, they put up a sample, they look at it, and then they go back inside.

Anyway, in addition to the State Seal and the golden letters spelling out “STATE OF CALIFORNIA,” the old courthouse will soon be getting a big plaque what says, “RONALD M. GEORGE STATE OFFICE COMPLEX.”

See?

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San Franciscans probably won’t ever really notice this addition to the front door of our California Supreme Court, but let’s meet our 27th Chief Justice:

“As a Superior Court judge, George presided over the trial of Hillside Strangler Angelo Buono in 1981–1983. George was lauded for his extremely unusual decision to deny the motion by Los Angeles County District Attorney‘s office to dismiss all 10 counts of murder against Buono. However, his unusual decision was speculated to be a result of his earlier decision to separate crucial counts of rape and sodomy, which in themselves would serve as evidence against the defendant, from the murder charges. The prosecutors felt the evidence against Buono was so weak that it did not justify even an attempt to win at trial. Judges rarely second-guess the prosecutors’ judgment on such a matter (and George stated that he was “loath” to do so). However, George’s review of the evidence in the case caused him to feel so strongly that the prosecutors were in error that he did exactly that.” 

See that? Dude wouldn’t let the prosecutor drop murder charges.

Now, what Arnold Schwarzenegger really wanted last year was to name the joint  the “Ronald M. George Justice Center,” but that didn’t fly with the SEIU union, so the name we’re getting is a kind of compromise. (Arnold also wanted to sell this building to his buddies but that didn’t work out neither, of course.)

Anyway, All Hail Republicans!

More deets of Executive Order S-17-10 after the jump.

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Harsh! San Francisco Architecture Critic John King Takes Down the Richmond District and Its NIMBYs!

Tuesday, March 22nd, 2011

Dude, harsh!

Dude!

“A Richmond Review article on a 2004 meeting described how an Almaden resident protested the likely loss of light and views – even though the building would be to the north, out of the sun’s path, and the “lost view” would be of a 125-foot-wide thoroughfare that has yet to grace a postcard.”

Harsh!

From the time betwixt the Coronet Theatre and the senior housing what’s there these days:

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Moving on. I’ve come to the conclusion that not only does John King take pichures as good as the full-time staff photographers/editors what’s at the San Francisco Chronicle, he takes pichures better than the full-time staff photographers/editors what’s at the San Francisco Chronicle.

I mean, he’s making his point about whatever, so isn’t he the best person to take the photo to make the point?

To prove this, I’d cite the photos from the article above and also what SFGate had about the CIRM worm. (I was looking forward to seeing how a pro would handle that crazy building, but oh well.) Compare those shots with John King’s over at the SFGate archive. See?

John King is better, faster, cheaper, stronger, photography-wise

Just saying, bro.