Posts Tagged ‘Congressman’

San Francisco Corruption Revealed on the Floor of the House – Central Subway to Nowhere – A Short Speech

Friday, July 6th, 2012

The Subway to Nowhere. House Chamber, Washington, D.C. June 27, 2012. Remarks by Congressman Tom McClintock (R-CA).”

“Mr. Chairman:

This amendment forbids further federal expenditures for the Central Subway project in San Francisco.

The project is a 1.7 mile subway that is estimated to cost $1.6 billion –– and those cost estimates continue to rise.  Its baseline budget has more than doubled in nine years and shows no signs of slowing.  The current estimate brings the cost to nearly $1 billion per mile.  That’s five times the cost per lane mile of Boston’s scandalous “Big Dig.”

It was supposed to link local light rail and bus lines with CalTrain and Bay Area Rapid Transit, but it’s so badly designed that it bypasses 25 of the 30 light rail and bus lines that it crosses.  To add insult to insanity, it dismantles the seamless light-rail to BART connection currently available to passengers at Market Street, requiring them instead to walk nearly a quarter mile to make the new connection.  Experts estimate it will cost commuters between five and ten minutes of additional commuting time on every segment of the route.

The Wall Street Journal calls ita case study in government incompetence and wasted taxpayer money.”

They’re not alone.  The Civil Grand Jury in San Francisco has vigorously recommended the project be scrapped, warning that maintenance alone could ultimately bankrupt San Francisco’s Muni.  The former Chairman of the San Francisco Transportation Agency has called it, “one of the costliest mistakes in the city’s history.

Even the sponsors estimate that it will increase ridership by less than one percent, and there is vigorous debate that this projection is far too optimistic.

I think Margaret Okuzumi, the Executive Director of the Bay Rail Alliance put it best when she said,

Too many times, we’ve seen money for public transit used to primarily benefit people who would profit financially, while making transit less convenient for actual transit riders.  Voters approve money for public transit because they want transit to be more convenient and available…it would be tragic if billions of dollars were spent on something that made Muni more time consuming, costly and unable to sustain its overall transit service.”

This administration is attempting to put federal taxpayers – our constituents — on the hook for nearly a billion dollars of the cost of this folly through the “New Starts” program – or more than 60 percent.  We have already squandered $123 million on it.  This amendment forbids another dime of our constituents’ money being wasted on this boondoggle.

Now here is an important question that members may wish to ponder:  “Why should your constituents pay nearly a billion dollars for a purely local transportation project in San Francisco that is opposed by a broad, bi-partisan coalition of San Franciscans, including the Sierra Club, Save Muni (a grassroots organization of Muni Riders), the Coalition of San Francisco Neighborhoods, and three of the four local newspapers serving San Francisco?

Why, indeed.

I’m sorry, I don’t have a good answer to that question.  But those who vote against this amendment had better have one when their constituents ask, “What in the world were you thinking?”

# # #

This amendment to the Transportation, Housing and Urban Development Appropriations Act (HR 5972) was approved by the House on June 29th.  The legislation next goes to the Senate.

Jesse Jackson Coming to UC Berkeley for Fred Korematsu Day – Sunday, January 30, 2011

Tuesday, January 25th, 2011

InsideBayArea has the deets.

Korematsu vs. United States

Fred Korematsu Day in Berkeley

Come celebrate the first Fred Korematsu Day on January 30, 2011, at UC Berkeley’s Wheeler Auditorium. The program includes keynote speaker Reverend Jesse Jackson and spoken word artist Beau Sia, as well as tributes from Karen Korematsu and California Assembly Members Warren Furutani and Marty Block. There will also be a screening of the film, Of Civil Wrongs and Rights: The Fred Korematsu Story.

Fred T. Korematsu was a national civil rights hero. In 1942, at the age of 23, he refused to go to the government’s incarceration camps for Japanese Americans. After he was arrested and convicted of defying the government’s order, he appealed his case all the way to the Supreme Court. In 1944, the Supreme Court ruled against him, arguing that the incarceration was justified due to military necessity.

In 1983, Dr. Peter Irons, a legal historian, discovered key documents that government intelligence agencies had hidden from the Supreme Court in 1944. The documents consistently showed that Japanese Americans had committed no acts of treason to justify mass incarceration. With this new evidence, a legal team of mostly Japanese American attorneys re-opened Korematsu’s 40 year-old case on the basis of government misconduct. On November 10, 1983, Korematsu’s conviction was overturned in a federal court in San Francisco. It was a pivotal moment in civil rights history.

Korematsu remained an activist throughout his life. In 1998, he received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor, from President Bill Clinton. Korematsu’s growing legacy continues to inspire activists of all backgrounds and demonstrates the importance of speaking up to fight injustice.”

http://korematsuinstitute.org/korematsu-day/celebration/

(For a list of other Fred Korematsu Day events throughout the state, click here)

Join the Korematsu Institute in celebrating the first Fred Korematsu Day!

DATE & TIME
Sunday Jan. 30, 2011x
1:00pm-2:00pm: VIP reception
2:00-3:00pm: Main Program
3:00-4:00pm: General reception
4:00-5:00pm: Screening of the Emmy Award-winning film
Of Civil Wrongs and Rights: the Fred Korematsu Story (60 min)

LOCATION
Wheeler auditorium
UC Berkeley campus
Berkeley, CA

PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION
Wheeler auditorium is a 15-minute walk from the Downtown Berkeley Bart station. Click here for walking directions.

PARKING
Cal Performances does not offer parking validation for this event, but street parking is free in Berkeley on Sundays. For a list of parking lots near the UC Berkeley campus, click here. For more information about parking on campus, please click here.

SPECIAL NEEDS
Wheeler Auditorium is accessible to people with disabilities. The closest drop off point near Wheeler is the alongside South Hall (see campus map). From there, it’s a short walk up the ramp and into Wheeler.

TICKETS
$100 VIP tickets include: VIP reception + Program (and seating in VIP section) + General Reception + Film Screening
$25 Full Price tickets include: Program + General Reception + Film Screening
$15 Discount tickets for Teachers/Non-profit employees/Senior Citizens (65+) include: Program + General Reception + Film Screening
$5 Student tickets include: Program + General Reception + Film Screening

Tickets on sale now! Tickets available for purchase online, by phone, by mail and fax, and in person from Cal Performances. Tickets can be mailed to buyers or held at Will Call and picked up at Wheeler auditorium (not Zellerbach Hall) on January 30. Please buy your tickets before January 30. Though last-minute tickets will be available on the day of the event, purchases can only be made in cash.

Seating: VIP ticket holders will be able to sit in a VIP section of the auditorium. All other ticket holders are eligible for general seating, so please arrive early to find the best available seats!

Cal Performances
tickets.berkeley.edu
Phone: (510) 642-9988
Fax: (510) 643-2359
The Cal Performances Ticket Office is located at the northeast corner of Zellerbach Hall on the UC Berkeley campus.

Event web site: fredkorematsuday.org
Facebook event page: http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=117833281622710&num_event_invites=0
For questions, email info@korematsuinstitute.org or call (415) 848-7727

PROGRAM

Rev. Jesse Jackson

A keynote speech by the Reverend Jesse Jackson. The founder and president of the Rainbow PUSH Coalition, Rev. Jackson is one of America’s foremost civil rights, religious and political figures. Over the past forty years, he has played a pivotal role in virtually every movement for empowerment, peace, civil rights, gender equality, and economic and social justice. In 2000, President Bill Clinton awarded Reverend Jackson the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor. Rev. Jackson has been called the “Conscience of the Nation” and “the Great Unifier,” challenging America to be inclusive and to establish just and humane priorities for the benefit of all. He is known for bringing people together on common ground across lines of race, culture, class, gender and belief. In 1999, Fred Korematsu was honored at the Rainbow PUSH Coalition’s annual awards dinner.

Karen Korematsu
Karen Korematsu, daughter of Fred Korematsu and co-founder of the Fred T. Korematsu Institute for Civil Rights and Education. Karen shares her father’s passion for social justice and continues to advance his legacy by helping the Institute with its development and outreach efforts and speaking at events around the country.

Beau Sia

A performance by spoken word artist Beau Sia. Oklahoma-born Sia was one of the original cast members in Russell Simmon’s Def Poetry Jam, which won a Tony Award in 2003. He has also appeared in It’s Showtime at the Apollo, HBO’s Def Poetry Jam, and the film Slam. He has published a book of poetry, A Night Without Armor II: The Revenge, and released two spoken word CDs, Attack! Attack! Go!and Dope and Wack.

Rep. Keith Ellison

A video message from Minnesota Congressman Keith Ellison. Rep. Ellison is the first Muslim ever elected to U.S. Congress. He has represented the Fifth Congressional District of Minnesota in the U.S. House of Representatives since taking office on January 4, 2007.

Keith’s philosophy is one of “generosity and inclusiveness.” His roots as a community activist and his message of inclusivity through democratic participation resonates throughout the Fifth District. His priorities in Congress are: promoting peace, prosperity for working families, environmental sustainability, and civil and human rights.

Asm. Warren Furutani

California Assemblymember Warren Furutani, co-sponsor of the Fred Korematsu Day bill. Asm. Furutani was re-elected to the 55th District in 2010 for his second two-year term. Warren has over 40 years of experience and involvement in education and public service. He is also the chair of the Asian Pacific Islander American Legislative Caucus, which has ten members. In 2008, he authored Assembly Bill 37, which granted honorary college degrees to Japanese Americans whose education was disrupted due to their wrongful incarceration during World War II.

Asm. Marty Block

California Assemblymember Marty Block, co-sponsor of the Fred Korematsu Day bill. Asm. Block was elected in November 2008 to represent the 78th District, one of the most diverse districts in the county of San Diego. He is a former dean and retired professor at San Diego State University (SDSU). His passion on education issues, both at the K-12 levels and collegiate levels shows a strong regard for those who have little or no voice in the political process.

Sydnie Kohara

Emcee Sydnie Kohara is an award-winning journalist and co-anchor of the CBS 5 Eyewitness News Early Edition. She has served as an international correspondent and anchor for CNBC in London and Singapore. Kohara is no stranger to public service and community outreach. She was a political appointee under California Governor George Deukmejian, serving as Chief of Communications for the California Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs. Kohara also helped found Camp CEO, a Girl Scout-sponsored retreat for at-risk teenage girls.

“Northern California’s Top Asian Pacific Islander Leaders Back Jerry Brown for Governor”

Monday, October 18th, 2010

Read all about it, below.

But first, here’s the very latest, from this afternoon – it appears as if the Message of the Day is that Meg = Arnold.

“As Meg Whitman continues her Schwarzenegger-like bus tour of California’s fast food restaurants, Brown spokesman Sterling Clifford released the following statement:
 
“Meg Whitman likes to tell Californians that she doesn’t owe anyone anything, but she owes Governor Schwarzenegger more than she wants to admit.
 
Outsider who will blow up the boxes? We’ve heard that before. Running the state more like a business? Check. Bus tour? A familiar tune. Why does so much of the Whitman campaign feel like a rerun? Because it is.
 
Arnold Schwarzenegger entered California politics with a cadre of the most expensive Republican consultants he could find, and they fed him a divisive agenda that Californians rejected.  He had the good sense to send them packing.  They have now de-camped to Whitman’s headquarters where they are recycling their empty slogans and shrill accusations.  Incredibly, Meg Whitman has already spent more than $14 million on Schwarzenegger’s old crew.
 
Schwarzenegger’s top strategist Mike Murphy? On the Whitman bus for $90,000 a month. The Governor’s former political director, Jeff Randle, is on Whitman’s payroll for more than half a million dollars. Schwarzenegger veterans Rob Stutzman, Mitch Zak, John McLaughlin, Stuart Polk, and more than 30 other consultants jumped from Schwarzenegger to Meg Whitman. She even uses the same public speaking coach.
 
Governor Schwarzenegger and Meg Whitman both say insanity is doing the same thing over and over again but expecting different results. On that, we all agree.”

O.K. then. Now, here’s this morning’s presser:

After introductions from Assemblywoman Fiona Ma and Senator Leland Yee, up came Congressman “Big Mike” Honda as Board of Supervisors President David Chiu looked on: 

Jerry was on. (And actually, Jerry on a rare off day > Meg on her best day.) JB always has situational awareness, he’s always knows what’s going on.

This morning’s mise-en-scene in Japantown / Upper Fillmore, with, among others, youthful Mayor of Campbell, CA Evan Low, Board of Equalization Member Betty Yee, and San Francisco Assessor Phil Ting:

And of course CBS5′s Joe Vazquez was on the scene to pepper Jerry with a question or two:

And look, it’s Joe “Shaky Hands” Garofoli on the scene with a Flip-cam to catch any possible Mayhill Fowler-style gaffes.  

There weren’t any today, so it looks like smooth sailing ’til November 2.

This will all be over soon…

“Given Brown’s record and commitment, Asian Pacific Islander leaders across California have endorsed his candidacy.  This includes Congressional members Mike Honda, Doris Matsui and Judy Chu, State Controller John Chiang, State Board of Equalization member Betty Yee, Former Acting Lt. Governor Mona Pasquil, California Democratic Legislative Caucus members:  Senators Carol Liu and Leland Yee, Assembly Members: Mike Eng, Paul Fong, Warren Furutani, Mary Hayashi, Ted Lieu, Fiona Ma, Alberto Torrico and Mariko Yamada.
 
Jerry Brown is also supported by San Francisco Board of Supervisors President David Chiu, Campbell Mayor Evan Low, Mountain View Mayor Margaret Abe-Koga, Monterey Park Mayor Anthony Wong, Cupertino Vice Mayor Gilbert Wong, Union City Council Member Manny Fernandez, Colma City Council Member Joanne Del Rosario, Alhambra Unified School District Member Bob Gin, Philippine News President Francis Espiritu, CEO of Megatoys Charlie Woo, Former Deputy State Superintendent of Instruction Henry Der, Former Appointment Secretary Michael Yamaki, Little Tokyo Service Center Executive Director Bill Watanabe, Former Milpitas Mayor Henry Manayan, Former Palo Alto Mayor Yoriko Kishimoto,  longtime API community leader Maeley Tom, Civil Rights attorney Dale Minami, Executive Director of the Japanese Cultural and Community Center, Paul Osaki, Former US Civil Rights Attorney Yvonne Lee, and many other leaders.”

All the deets, after the jump.

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