Posts Tagged ‘conservatory of flowers’

The SF Recreation and Park Department Picks a Cold December Day to Confiscate This Communal Tent in GGP

Monday, December 9th, 2013

I’ll tell you, it’s just 59 degrees up near the ceiling of my living room this chilly AM, but I think I’m getting used to our current cold snap. People who might feel differently would be those who were making this big-ass tent their home in Golden Gate Park as recently as Thursday night.

Man, that was a big-ass tent:

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Do hippies really try to pitch tents within a couple hundred yards of the Conservatory of Flowers? Hippies do. Apparently. I guess it makes for an easy commute to Upper Haight or wherever.

Anyway, here’s the scene about an hour later, with this woman yelling, incredulous, saying, “The tent’s gone? They took the fucking tent?” And dude up the hill was all, ” I tried to stop them.”

I know that RPD staffers get irked by homeless people living in GGP but the 415 is experiencing a pretty epic cold snap these days and Golden Gate Park has the coldest places in the city, like four or five degrees colder than what gets officially reported for San Francisco.

So I think I’d probably let the hippies be until things warm up a bit, just saying.

Midnight Sparring, Conservatory of Flowers, Golden Gate Park

Tuesday, July 2nd, 2013

Jumping ropes and boxing gloves?

Looks like some people have been night exercising:

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OMG, Now’s the Time to Join the Conservatory of Flowers – $29 for a One-Year Family Membership via Google Offers

Tuesday, December 20th, 2011

I think this deal from Google Offers San Francisco expires tomorrow, so act soon.

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Canon 85mm 1.2 Mark I, totally wide open 

See you there at the Conservatory of Flowers!

OMG, “Playland at the Conservatory” is Totally Awesome – Annual Garden Railway Show Has Beach Ephemera

Friday, November 18th, 2011

Get all the deets right here, and here at the Richmond District Blog, and below.

This show will run through April 15, 2012.

Check it, Playland at the Beach ephemera:

All photos by Nina Sazevich – click to expand

“Take a trip down memory lane as a bygone era of seaside amusement comes to miniature life in this season’s Conservatory of Flowers garden railway exhibition

November 18, 2011 ­ – April 15, 2012

Step right up for a ride back in time as the Conservatory of Flowers presents an all new garden railway display celebrating the legendary Playland at the Beach and a bygone era of seaside amusement that was located on San Francisco’s West End. In a dazzling display landscaped with hundreds of dwarf plants, model trains and trolleys wend their way past the famed Sutro Baths, zip around a replica of the Victorian-era Cliff House and whiz through a fantastic mini version of San Francisco’s beloved Playland at the Beach. 

Playland at the Conservatory, the conservatory’s 4th Annual Garden Railway, is an entirely new layout that resurrects the heyday of San Francisco’s west end, an area that flourished as a destination for fun and thrills after a new railroad built in 1884 made travel out to the ocean affordable. A dozen San Francisco landmarks, now mostly lost to time, are recreated in miniature and set in a landscape of hundreds of dwarf plants that bring the rocky cliffs and sandy shores of the area to life. Sutro Baths, the fantastical 7-pool swimming complex built in 1896 by eccentric mayor Adolph Sutro, nestles under Sutro’s other attraction, the Cliff House, which he transformed in that same year into a 7-story Victorian chateau. 

No doubt the recreated Playland at the Beach will be the star of the garden railway. Young and old alike will marvel at the sight of Playland’s most famous attractions in miniature, all in swirling motion and bright with twinkling carnival lights, while the sounds of the arcade and even Laffing Sal’s boisterous voice transport visitors right back to the midway. Wee rollercoaster cars climb the steep tracks of the Big Dipper, Playland’s biggest thrill ride from the 1920s to the 1950s, while a mini Airplane Ride spins and spins in circles. Other attractions include the treacherous Diving Bell, the Fun House and Playland¹s famed food arcade where hungry revelers could grab an enchilada at the Hot House or a sweet at the Candy Factory. 

As in past years, these replicas are all creatively crafted in miniature from recycled and repurposed materials. Playland’s historic 1906 carousel was created from a discarded light fixture, a slide carousel and a record player. The individual cages of the Rock-O-Plane are made from old pencil sharpeners. 

The exhibit also includes real memorabilia and photographs from Playland and beyond in a fascinating display that tells the story of San Francisco’s lost ocean-front treasures. Original wool bathing suits from Sutro Baths, the toothpick amusement park made by San Quentin inmate Jack Harrington that was displayed in the museum at the Baths, a Dodger bumper car, an original Playland sign and more provide visitors with an engaging way to experience and learn about San Francisco’s past. Period arcade games offer a hands-on history lesson with a chance to get your future from Zoltar, step into a vintage 1960s photo booth or goof around in the fun house mirrors, while a special scavenger hunt spinning wheel is a great, interactive way for young children to explore the exhibit. Portions of the popular documentary “Remembering Playland” will also be showing in the gallery.”

All right, see you there!

OMG, It’s the “Nutcracker Guide to Our City” from the San Francisco Ballet – Click and Learn

Friday, November 18th, 2011

Well, somebody spent a lot of time putting this together.

All the deets, below.

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“EXPLORE ICONIC CITY LOCATIONS WITH “NUTCRACKER GUIDE TO OUR CITY”

SAN FRANCISCO —Today, San Francisco Ballet—the first professional ballet company in America and the first in the country to perform Nutcracker—announced the launch of its Nutcracker Guide to Our City, an interactive magazine inspired by SF Ballet’s Nutcracker production. It can be accessed online by visiting:www.sfballet.org/cityguide.

Like the SF Ballet production, the guide is set in early twentieth-century San Francisco and  presents a rich journey through five historic locations around the city, including: Alamo Square, the Conservatory of Flowers, Chinatown, the Palace of Fine Arts, and the War Memorial Opera House.

The content-rich magazine also features blog entries by local historians and architecture experts, video interviews with SF Ballet dancers, and vintage photography of San Francisco from the early 1900’s.

“Since San Francisco was the first city in America to offer a full-length Nutcracker, it’s only fitting that Artistic Director Helgi Tomasson set San Francisco Ballet’s current production in early twentieth-century San Francisco,” said SF Ballet Executive Director Glenn McCoy. “To celebrate the long-standing ties between the city and this annual holiday tradition, we’ve created a fun, interactive guide that explores five city locations that are integral to our production,” added McCoy.

Upon launching the guide, SF Ballet will offer special discounts and deals for some of the locations featured in the magazine, as well as the chance to win free tickets to SF Ballet’sNutcracker.

These holiday deals will only be available online to SF Ballet social media fans. To learn more, “like” SF Ballet on Facebook: facebook.com/sfballet, and follow SF Ballet on Twitter:twitter.com/SFBallet.

Ever more deets after the jump

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The Park Station SFPD Lying in Wait on the Speediest Part of JFK Jr Drive near 8th Avenue in Golden Gate Park

Friday, November 4th, 2011

I assume that this officer is parked here, betwixt the Conservatory of Flowers and 8th Avenue, for the benefit of speeders.

(BMW drivers, especially, have a hard time keeping to the limit here, it seems…)

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Sometimes the cops put an automated radar trailer what tells you your speed, but people tend to ignore it.

As this Audi (Chariot of the Yuppie) driver shows. (Note that he was slowing down to 36 MPH in this shot.)

Oh well.

Aphid vs. Orchid at Our Conservatory of Flowers in Golden Gate Park – BTW, Wicked Plants “Leaves” Oct 30th

Friday, October 21st, 2011

Can you spot the pest on this orchid from our San Francisco Conservatory of Flowers?

Do you see the tiny Clue near the middle between the two petals? Look hard:

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Let’s zoom in. Oh, here’s the culprit. It’s Colonel Mustard in the Conservatory using her sucking mouthpart as a weapon.

Mystery solved (via a Canon 65mm lens setup that looked a little something like this.)

BTW, the Wicked Plants: Botanical Rogues & Assassins exhibition is leaving us October 30th, so get on over there soon.

The Lazy Sunbathers of Golden Gate Park Turn the Garfield Statue Hill Into Duboce Park West

Friday, October 14th, 2011

The area around the old-time Garfield Statue in Golden Gate Park is becoming Duboce Park West.

At least on those dreaded sunny days, when the lazy sunbathers all come out:

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Enjoy.

Visit Your Golden Gate Park Rose Garden at Funston and Fulton, Why Not? It’s In Full Bloom These Days

Monday, July 18th, 2011

I don’t go around our Yelp four-star-rated Rose Garden too much as I generally save my flower viewing time for the Yelp five-star-rated Dahlia Dell near our Conservatory of Flowers.

But San Francisco’s official flower doesn’t really get going until August so roses will have to do until then.

Can you see the photographer here, with the Twinflash hanging off the lens and a water spray bottle hanging off the belt? That’s how some of them do it:

Via Glenn Franco Simmons – click to expand

Oh, and here’s my effort, on a dreaded sunny in the West Bay, showing people milling about the plots:

All right, see you there!

OMG, Wicked Plants: Botanical Rogues & Assassins Runs April 7 to October 30, 2011 at Our Conservatory of Flowers!

Friday, March 18th, 2011

All the deets:

Wicked Plants: Botanical Rogues & Assassins
April 7 – October 30, 2011

Paralysis, strangulation, derangement – these are just a few of the misdeeds of the plant kingdom as chronicled by award-winning author Amy Stewart in her 2009 New York Times Bestseller, Wicked Plants: The Weed that Killed Lincoln’s Mother & Other Botanical Atrocities. And now, something wicked this way comes. It’s mayhem under glass, as the Conservatory of Flowers transforms its Special Exhibits Gallery into an eerie Victorian garden full of Mother Nature’s most appalling creations. Building on the fascinating plant portraits in Stewart’s book, the Conservatory introduces visitors to living examples of dozens of infamous plants that have left their mark on history and claimed many an unfortunate victim, like the castor bean, implicated in the 1978 “umbrella murder” of communist defector BBC journalist Georgi Markov, and the strychnine tree, nineteenth-century serial killer Dr. Thomas Neill Cream’s poison of choice for troublesome spouses and lovers. It’s a who’s who of botanical rogues and assassins. Meet them if you dare!

Deadly nightshade, via Amy Stewart

See you there!