Posts Tagged ‘Cosco busan’

Bay Bridge Alpha Tower and 14 Minions

Monday, November 14th, 2011

Typical San Francisco infrastructure, by David Yu:

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Look for this area to be filled with football-field length yachts soon, you know, for the America’s Cup boat race…

Bay Bridge Delta Tower and Bird

Friday, November 11th, 2011

Via David Yu:

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That tower was the part of the San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge what got hit by the MSC Venezia (fka MV COSCO Busan) back in aught-seven.

Hurray, That COSCO Company is Back in Town, Just Three and a Half Years After the Cosco Busan Petroleum Spill

Wednesday, May 11th, 2011

And just look what the China Ocean Shipping (Group) Company has for us.

As seen on Market Street.

It’s hard to tell at first, but the iPad2 logo is from an SFMTA ad. (I fooled myself for a moment there.)

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Sorry about that bar pilot, COSCO.

Remembering the Cosco Busan Oil Spill Three Years Later – Turns Out That Everybody was to Blame

Wednesday, November 10th, 2010

Has it been only three years since the Cosco Busan, the leakiest 2001 Hyundai ever, spilled 58,000 gallons of bunker fuel* into the bay? Seems longer.

Anyway, turns out that a dude who supposed to be up front looking out for stuff in the pea soup fog was downstairs in the galley eating breakfast. I did not know that, no sir. Of course, the idea to depart on sked despite the fog came from the bar pilot, so that’s the person who’s primarily responsible. But there still plenty of blame to go around. Deets below.

Screeeeeeeeeeeeeeeech!

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All right, it’s Blame Time:

The National Transportation Safety Board determined the following probable causes of the accident:

- the pilot’s degraded cognitive performance from his use of prescription medications, despite his completely clean post accident drug test,
- the absence of a comprehensive pre-departure master/pilot exchange and a lack of effective communication between Pilot John Cota and Master Mao Cai Sun during the accident voyage, and
- (COSCO Busan Master) Sun’s ineffective oversight of Cota’s piloting performance and the vessel’s progress.

Other contributing factors included:

- the failure of Fleet Management Ltd. to train the COSCO Busan crewmembers (which led to such acts of gross negligence as the bow lookout eating breakfast in the galley instead of being on watch) and Fleet Management’s failure to ensure that the crew understood and complied with the company’s safety management system;
- the failure of Caltrans to maintain foghorns on the bridge which were silent despite the heavy fog;
- the failure of Vessel Traffic Safety (VTS) to alert Cota and Sun that they were headed for the tower. VTS is legally required to alert a vessel if an accident appears imminent, yet they remained silent;
- the malfunctioning radar on the COSCO Busan, which led Captains Cota and Sun to use an electronic chart for the rest of the voyage. Although Coast Guard investigators found the radar to be in working order, they did not examine it until days after the accident (allowing time for faulty equipment to be fixed, which is not uncommon after a marine accident)
- Captain Sun’s incorrect identification of symbols on the electronic chart;
- the U.S. Coast Guard’s failure to provide adequate medical oversight of Cota, in view of the medical and medication information he had reported to the Coast Guard

Happy Anniversary, Cosco Busan, or should I say MSC Venezia? Don’t ever come back.

The patched-up ship finally hits the road, back in aught-seven – this was the last time we’ll ever see the Cosco Busan in the Bay Area, most likely:

*Yeah, Wiki is still wrong on that gallonage figure, partly due to the U.S. Coast Guard sitting on information for months and months ’cause they didn’t want to earn themselves any more bad press.

Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger Announces the California Disaster Corps

Friday, June 25th, 2010

Looks like Arnold is doing something besides those photo-ops these days.  

Not that he’s not good at photo-ops, like this one from a few years back. Anyway, here’s what he’s up to today:

Governor Schwarzenegger Launches First-in-the-Nation Disaster Corps

LOS ANGELES, June 25 — Governor Schwarzenegger today launched the first-in-the-nation Disaster Corps to professionalize, standardize and coordinate highly trained disaster volunteers statewide. Disaster Corps volunteers will be registered by their local government organization under the Disaster Service Worker Volunteer Program and will meet Disaster Corps training, typing, certification and security screening guidelines.

“California is always leading the way and now we are the first state in the nation to integrate volunteers into our state emergency plan,” said Governor Schwarzenegger. “Volunteers are an incredible resource, and no state has more giving, more passionate or more dedicated volunteers than California. Together, we will take volunteerism to a whole new level and make California better prepared and better equipped than ever before, for any emergency.”

In the aftermath of the 2007 Southern California Wildfires and Cosco Busan Oil Spill, thousands of disaster volunteers poured into affected areas to assist with evacuations, sheltering, clean-up and a host of other activities supporting response operations. Governor Schwarzenegger recognized the need to more effectively integrate and coordinate disaster volunteer efforts in all phases of emergency management, from disaster preparedness to disaster response and recovery. In February 2008, Governor Schwarzenegger appointed Karen Baker to serve as the state’s and also the nation’s first secretary of Service and Volunteering and charged her office with the development of the Disaster Corps.

All the deets, after the jump

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See the Sea Princess in Drydock at Pier 70 Tonight on the National Geographic Channel

Thursday, June 3rd, 2010

Remember back in the day, when San Francisco was a blue collar town? Well, dude, S.F. is still a blue collar town, if only because of BAE Systems and all the stuff they do with ships on the east si-iiiide.

Remember the 70-yard band-aid that was slapped on the Cosco Busan at Pier 70 a few years back? This will show the same kind of deal – tonight you’ll be able to see all the deets of the work of our highly-paid blue-collar types. You’ll be able to see the Sea Princess, inside and out.

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Enjoy:

Sea Princess Stars in National Geographic Channel’s Hit Series ‘World’s Toughest Fixes’

June 3 Episode to Take Viewers Behind the Scenes During Princess Cruises Ship’s Drydock

SANTA CLARITA, Calif., June 1  — The immense job of drydocking Sea Princess will be featured in the June 3 episode of National Geographic Channel’s (NGC) top-rated show, World’s Toughest Fixes.  TV viewers can go behind the scenes as host Sean Riley follows the entire process from the time the Princess Cruises ship enters the drydock to the final sea trials.

Airing on Thursday, June 3 at 9 p.m. ET/PT on NGC, the show was filmed while Sea Princess was in a regularly scheduled drydock at BAE Systems San Francisco Ship Repair last September.  The episode focuses on the enormous task of completing a multitude of drydock projects in just 15 days, with emphasis on several technical “fixes” on the bottom of the ship that could only be accessed when the ship is out of the water.

“This is a unique opportunity for audiences to really appreciate the amazing around-the-clock effort needed to keep our ships in top shape to deliver the experience our passengers expect,” said Jan Swartz, Princess Cruises executive vice president.  “We’re excited that the National Geographic Channel was interested in featuring this rare behind-the-scenes project.”

One of the network’s most popular shows, World’s Toughest Fixes takes viewers inside some of the most daunting repair jobs with Riley, a professional master rigger, as he works with many of the world’s top mechanics to show how they tackle these challenging fixes. World’s Toughest Fixes airs Thursdays at 9 p.m. ET/PT on NGC.

Riley joins the Sea Princess drydock crew on a number of tasks, adding his own elbow grease and expertise along the way and tries out several drydock jobs.  He helps strip and power wash the hull, tries his hand at upholstery work and joins the team working high up on the ship to seal the windows.  He even gives viewers an up-close view inside the tail shaft housing as he crawls in to show the audience the work being done.

Throughout the episode viewers will get a glimpse of the buzz of activity on a ship in drydock, including a look at installation of carpet and floors, the stripping of wooden decks, and even a glimpse of the ship’s new adults-only Sanctuary which was constructed during the drydock.

More photos of last fall’s Sea Princess drydock are available in the Sea Princess Drydock Journal.  Behind-the-scenes photos of the World’s Toughest Fixes crew at work during the shoot are available on the Princess Flickr photostream.

Additional information about Princess Cruises is available through a professional travel agent, by calling 1-800-PRINCESS, or by visiting the company’s website at www.princess.com.

 Princess can also be found on:
 Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/PrincessCruises
 Twitter: http://twitter.com/PrincessCruises
 Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/princesscruises

Cosco Busan Oil Spill Endgame: Chinese-Based Fleet Management Ltd. to pay $10 Mil.

Friday, February 19th, 2010

Here’s the news from the boys and girls at Justice, below.

Patched up and riding high – the last time we saw the Cosco Busan back in 2007. Will it ever come back? She’s called the MSC Venezia these days, currently working in the Canaries.

Oh well, she’s not the first Hyundai to leak oil into San Francsico Bay, and she won’t be the last.

The full release, after the jump

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Come to SF,CA if Your Huge Ship Needs Repair – Fixing Up the Sea Princess

Monday, September 21st, 2009

Check out this humongous cruise ship in drydock on the right side of San Francisco at Pier 70. (You know, right near the place where Mayor Gavin Newsom rented out San Francisco’s sovereignty and got snookered by the Chinese government simultaneously during the 2008 Olympic torch run fiasco.) This ship is big - like Cosco Busan big. But why did the people at Princess Cruise Lines choose San Francisco as a place to do a refit? Why not, baby? We rock! (It’s nice to know that San Francisco is still competitive in a few industries anyway.)

It’s the Sun-class Sea Princess, soon to be equipped with an adults-only [no, not that kind of adults-only] Sanctuary, an “oasis of tranquility” where you can escape from those pesky little anklebiters. 

Love, exiting and new - come aboard, we’re expecting you! Click to expand:

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Can you see the big black screen? It’s for movies under the stars, just like we have in Dolores Park.

And here are the twin screws:

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And here’s a thruster hole (or whatever they call it) – all the better for maneuvering around at ports of call.

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BAE Systems will have this princess back on her feet and heading down south, Panama way, in no time.

Check out all the deets here.

And of course, the PCL people are Twittering all about it.

And look at all the recent drydock photos here on Flickr.

And the Facebook, always with the FB.

And look who christened the Sea Princess, back in the day – Zara Phillips, a real princess, or princess-to-be, or something. Her grandmother is the Queen of England anyway.

Bon Voyage, Sea Princess!

San Francisco’s Rocket Boat Approaches, But Doesn’t Hit, the Bay Bridge Delta Tower

Monday, August 17th, 2009

OMG! It’s the San Francisco Rocket Boat! Does it really go over 40 MPH on San Francisco Bay? Yes it does.

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Oh noes! Now it’s heading right towards the Delta Tower of the San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge!

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But, good thing there’s a bar pilot on board. What’s that? There’s not?

On second thought, maybe it’s a Good Thing there’s no half-million dollar a year pilot on board. Rocket Boat managed to clear the tower and proceed back to Fisherman’s Wharf.

Hurray!

Cosco Busan Update: The NTSB Spanks the U.S. Coast Guard Hard

Wednesday, February 18th, 2009

The United States Coast Guard has a bit of work to do per the National Transportation Safety Board‘s news release today regarding the Cosco Busan oil spill of 2007. Sure, the pilot and the shipping firm get blamed, but the USCG takes a few under the waterline as well.

Read on below. Note that they don’t call the Delta Tower of the Bay Bridge the “Delta Span” as many, many people have (including Captain Cota on the day in question). Also note the figure of 53,000 gallons mentioned by the NTSB. It’s not clear whether this is the latest estimate of the size of the spill or if it’s the same exact figure leadership elements of the USCG falsely quoted to the press for months for some idiotic reason having to do with not wanting to be criticised for changing their minds or something. Bad form, Coast Guard. Wiki still says 58,000 gallons or so, so that’s good enough for me.   

The USCG buzzing about on a happier day: 

Washington, DC – The National Transportation Safety Board determined today that a medically unfit pilot, an ineffective master, and poor communications between the two were the cause of an accident in which the Cosco Busan container ship spilled thousands of gallons of fuel oil into the San Francisco Bay after striking a bridge support tower.

On November 7, 2007, at about 8:00 a.m. PST, in heavy fog with visibility of less than a quarter mile, the Hong Kong- registered, 901-foot-long container ship M/V Cosco Busan left its berth in the Port of Oakland destined for South Korea. The San Francisco Bay pilot, who was attempting to navigate the ship between the Delta and Echo support towers of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, issued directions that resulted in the ship heading directly toward the Delta support tower. While avoiding a direct hit, the side of the ship struck the fendering system at the base of the Delta tower, which created a 212-foot-long gash in the ship’s forward port side and breached two fuel tanks and a ballast tank.

More deets after the jump.

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